Range retards

#1
Croque Monsieur was just telling me at lunch about a guy at his club shooting a Mauser 96 pistol. Apparently it was making rather a lot of noise, and was really not functioning very well at all, with the sear not engaging properly.

It turns out that the guy was shooting Norma 7.62 x 25 Tokarev ammunition in it, because "it's all I could get for it". Apparently this guy has never heard of either ordering the correct ammunition, or rolling his own.

Croque Monsieur, on discovering what the pistol was being fed on, declined the offer of a few shots with it.

Can't blame him...
 
#3
gob open in amazment ! .... some people should not be allowed within 20 miles of anything more dangerous than an elastic band.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#4
Nothing like a proper mong to liven up a range day.

In fact, the only thing that I enjoy more than watching mongs on a rifle range, is watching mongs on a game shoot.

20bore cartridges in a 12bore anyone?

BOOM!
 
#5
Many years ago on German range I was at the extreme left of the pistol range and to my right were several shooters engaged in a competition which involved timed and rapid fire. I was doing my thing in slow time. I think that the range officer had completely forgotten about me, that is until mong features cleared the competitors to go forward to check scores. A quiet "word" from my S&W 686 woke people up to the potential problem they were facing.
 
#6
Drlligaf said:
Many years ago on German range I was at the extreme left of the pistol range and to my right were several shooters engaged in a competition which involved timed and rapid fire. I was doing my thing in slow time. I think that the range officer had completely forgotten about me, that is until mong features cleared the competitors to go forward to check scores. A quiet "word" from my S&W 686 woke people up to the potential problem they were facing.
Not got a tongue in your head, cowboy?
 

Alsacien

MIA
Moderator
#7
Had a muppet firing a .22lr pistol in 50mtr free pistol next to me on a range last year (I was prone with a rifle luckily). In his best duelling pistol mode, he loaded, raised his arm 45 degrees, started to lower his arm and ND'd at the steel roll down door.
Bits of lead went bouncing around all over the covered firing point - the other French guys shooting just laughed and called him a cnut (I think).... 8O
 
#8
Some time back [about 20 years or so] Moi's unit was taking part in an inter service shooting competition at Pirbright. EVERYBODY was there, but visualise please.....
Lots of bored squaddies, lots of ammo and lack of supervision..

On the pistol range which is a little bit off to one side and a bit isolated, guys start to relieve the boredom by doing 'quick draw' antics. As usual there is one, in this case a Bootneck, who takes things too far. He sticks the 9mm down the front of his combats to 'draw', but in his rush, has an nd and removes the last inch of his personal piece.

Although he survived, i did hear that he was eventually dis-charged from the corps. Not because of any disciplinary reasons, but because, as everyone knows......
.....
....
you have to be a complete prick to be a royal marine!


...
 
#9
there was a mong in Creggan poncing around with a 9mm,Browning who managed to shoot himself twice with one round through his thigh and then through his calf muscle, he was siting at the time, we casavaced him in a Scout to Ballykelly
 
#10
there was a mong in Creggan poncing around with a 9mm,Browning who managed to shoot himself twice with one round through his thigh and then through his calf muscle, he was siting at the time, we casavaced him in a Scout to Ballykelly
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
Back in my Air Cadet/Space Cadet .303 days, one of our officers thought it would be interesting to bring along an 18th century blunderbuss and have a go at the target from about 50 yards.

Pretty well removed the target......

Wordsmith
 
#12
Cuddles said:
Drlligaf said:
Many years ago on German range I was at the extreme left of the pistol range and to my right were several shooters engaged in a competition which involved timed and rapid fire. I was doing my thing in slow time. I think that the range officer had completely forgotten about me, that is until mong features cleared the competitors to go forward to check scores. A quiet "word" from my S&W 686 woke people up to the potential problem they were facing.
Not got a tongue in your head, cowboy?
Cuddles you are apparently unaware of what goes on on a 25 mtr range. Just to put you in the picture, the RCOs duties amongst others are to ensure that nobody goes forward of the firing point until all weapons have been unloaded, inspected and that the firers thereafter do not touch the weapons until told to do so. Had that particular RCO carried out this very important duty, the incident would not have occured. As for the individual shooters, they all stand in individual bays and therefore cannot see to their left or right unless they step back, having laid down the weapon first. As for a tongue in my head, yes I do have one , as do the other firers who had a "kind" word or two to say to the RCO. I declined to make any comment as I think he had got the message by then. Cowboy? Western shooting is not my thing, but it has gained considerable popularity here in Germany.
 
#13
Mid 70s on a range somewhere near RAF Wyton we were having an SMG practice. For those not familiar with this weapon the cocking handle is curved and the inside of the curve should face forward. Unfortunately the cocking handle can be fitted the wrong way round. Murphys Law always applies as a certain young Flying Officer found out. Detail with a magazine of 10 rounds LOAD, READY ---- Bang. WHO FIRED THAT SHOT?
Exit a rather shamed faced junior officer. A combination of curved oiled cocking handle and cold hands (it was February) does not necessarily provide a good grip.
 
#14
I have been shooting since 1964 and have had one ND ,while in JLR at Bovington, fireing had stopped and clear guns given,one of the PS instructors had been shooting on the left hand point and the rifles were laid down , the shooter went forward, and the PS Sgt told me to pick up the four No8s and get ready to take them back to the amoury. I picked up the first rifle, the one used by the PS sgt closed the bolt released the trigger and it went off. it appeared that the extractor was broken when the previous round had fired but the PS had not looked into the breach, and I thinking that a PS instructor could do no wrong ,also had not looked, luckly no one was hit, but by fu** did I learn a lesson that day
 
#15
6 GPMGs on the 300m point. RCO had just finished ".....go on" when 2 pheasants glided in to land on the 100m point. Need I finish the story ?


Not sure that in 30 odd years I've ever seen truely dangerous practice, bar the time two newly commissioned TA subbies were tasked to run a live section attack range at Sennybridge. Now, of course, I realise we were completely unqualified etc. We did have the common to ask the Range Warden how it was set up.....but I've never had the gun group switch quite so late as that since. We genuinely frightened ourselves - and the troops.
 
#16
My only "close call" was with a 9mm Browning (my own.. pre ban)

I had a misfire.. cap struck - no bang.

I then broke the rules... I put the round back in the mag and cycled the slide..

A good thing the weaqpon was pointing into the stop butt, because it fired as the round chambered...!

I got away with it because everthing was pointing in the right direction.. But never cycle a struck round through an automatic action...
 
#17
I had a similar experience once with a muppet who decided it would be a good idea to shoot some ferocious IMI/Sampson 0.357 Magnum +P with conical AP bullets through a PPC style K frame model 19, fitted with a really tight Douglas match barrel, with a bore that slugged something like 0.354", i.e. a revolver basically designed for squib match wadcutters loads only.

"Are you sure that's a good idea?" says I innocently.

"Naah...It'll be fine".

I move discreetly away. 20 rounds or so later...."BOOOM!!!"

Result: one bloody hand and an expensive pile of scrap.
 
#18
Drlligaf said:
Cuddles said:
Drlligaf said:
Many years ago on German range I was at the extreme left of the pistol range and to my right were several shooters engaged in a competition which involved timed and rapid fire. I was doing my thing in slow time. I think that the range officer had completely forgotten about me, that is until mong features cleared the competitors to go forward to check scores. A quiet "word" from my S&W 686 woke people up to the potential problem they were facing.
Not got a tongue in your head, cowboy?
Cuddles you are apparently unaware of what goes on on a 25 mtr range. Just to put you in the picture, the RCOs duties amongst others are to ensure that nobody goes forward of the firing point until all weapons have been unloaded, inspected and that the firers thereafter do not touch the weapons until told to do so. Had that particular RCO carried out this very important duty, the incident would not have occured. As for the individual shooters, they all stand in individual bays and therefore cannot see to their left or right unless they step back, having laid down the weapon first. As for a tongue in my head, yes I do have one , as do the other firers who had a "kind" word or two to say to the RCO. I declined to make any comment as I think he had got the message by then. Cowboy? Western shooting is not my thing, but it has gained considerable popularity here in Germany.
Been a few years since I ran a range, but a good loud gulder of "STOP!!" would have been a little more appropriate.
 
#19
My sister in law,Linda managed to jam the cylinder on her Ruger security six, at forst I could not find what was jaming it but I then realised that the last bullet fired was sruck just out of the cartridge case, so I got a drift to knock it back into the chamber, as there were still 2 live rounds still in the chamber you can understand I was being very carefull. Well the drift only went into the 6" barrel about 1 1/2 " It was a second bullet that had only been propeled part way up the barrel, so I carefully drifted both rounds out, She had bough some cheap "Black Widow" 38 sp rounds and it was the first time she had used it . I .checked out the rest of the box and found that three more rounds had no powder in them, it was only the primer that had gone off thuss pushing the round only part way along the barrel. Iff this had been a full load round she would have been realy f**** up, as it was, we had the barrel checked and it was found OK but she was very lucky not to get killed, and Ruger pistols must have very good barrels
 
#20
When I was 19 I was invited to a shooting club by a friend.

He has a Winchester 44.40 lever action made in 1912 which had a WD arrow on it - it had been used in the early days of the RFC as an air-to-air weapons system.

He offered me a shoot, and of course I nearly bit his hand off. He loaded 3 rounds so I went prone and squeezed off the first round - action smooth as silk and nothing in the way of recoil. 2 round ditto.

By the 3rd round I was starting to relax, so I squeezed off the round and the effing thing roared out and reared up, banging the back of my left hand (I shoot rifles left-handed) into my nose, seriously watering my eyes.

'I knew you'd do that. The first two rounds were factory loads, the 3rd was one of my 'warm' home loads. Let that be a lesson.......'

It certainly was.

I shot him.*


*I didn't really.
 

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