Random CMT weapon question

#1
Ok random question I know, but when a CMT is assigned to a unit (Infantry or otherwise) what is he/she armed with? (Other than bad language :twisted: )

I have seen some of those cut down SA80 (L22 Carbine?), are these things issued or do CMT's have the standard SA80?

Just seems useful to my uneducated mind for medics to have something a bit lighter and more compact when in the field.
 
#7
Depends on the job, ie proportional to the perceived threat but usually nothing larger than side or small-arms since a CMT is provided with a weapon for his/her personal defence and that of their casualty and/or medical establishment. There's a bit more to it, but that's it in a nutshell. has to do with status under RoE.

Boring answer, I know, but I couldn't come up with anything near as funny as Legs'...LMAO!
 
#9
Why? Just man up and carry the bloody thing.

The K-stubby is for donkey-whollopers and not just given to people with weak, tiny arms.
 
#10
5 GS trialled the carbine IIRC don't know whether a paper was written on the results but it certainly came up trumps for a few reasons. Firstly you don't stab your patient in the head with your muzzle when you pick up a stretcher with a rifle slung on your back. It's considerably easier to bring to bear from inside the cab of a amby or rover. It's good for the girls, some of the smaller girls shot better on grouping and zeroing as the more compact weapon was easier for them to support with their stubby little arms! from personal experience it would probably be better for armd tp too.

Bobath wrote:

Why? Just man up and carry the bloody thing.

The K-stubby is for donkey-whollopers and not just given to people with weak, tiny arms.


Do you want the SLR back too? It's not about manning up it's about best tool for the job, for a medic it would seem that the carbine fits better than a standard riffle, not just practically but also with our ROE.
 
#11
Bring back the SMG, that was a real mans weapon, couldnt trust a woman with it though, drop it with a loaded magazine whilst trying to apply some lippy and you'd kill everyone in the toilet/amby/clothes shop/pie shop/etc..
 
#12
Evilgoblin, it was made for tankies and the like, not medics. If the argument is that the stubby is easyer to use in a BFA or Rover why way I driving around Iraq in a snatch with an LSW?

No i don't want the SLR, but the SA80 is a tool we have and its fine for the job. A medics group size or ability to shoot isn't the be all and end all. If the medics are putting rounds down then something has gone horribly, horribly wrong. As for girls with little arms, one of the woman in my unit is a much better pistol shot than a rifle shot, so mabey its Browning HPs all round.

I have never smacked someone in the head with the rifle during a stretcher lift or any other form of casivac for that matter. It has a perfectly good sling, designed to be pulled tight around the body when th eweapon is not in use. If your knocking your patients out you could try doing that.
 
#13
bobath_lost_his_account said:
Evilgoblin, it was made for tankies and the like, not medics. If the argument is that the stubby is easyer to use in a BFA or Rover why way I driving around Iraq in a snatch with an LSW?

No i don't want the SLR, but the SA80 is a tool we have and its fine for the job. A medics group size or ability to shoot isn't the be all and end all. If the medics are putting rounds down then something has gone horribly, horribly wrong. As for girls with little arms, one of the woman in my unit is a much better pistol shot than a rifle shot, so mabey its Browning HPs all round.

I have never smacked someone in the head with the rifle during a stretcher lift or any other form of casivac for that matter. It has a perfectly good sling, designed to be pulled tight around the body when th eweapon is not in use. If your knocking your patients out you could try doing that.
Sorry to ask but have you been on recent Ops?

To start there are less and less LSWs (not seen any yet) being used in both theatres as the MINIMI is used now. The Browning has now made way for the Sig Sauer 226 - Yes there are still people using the Browning but not many and the Carbine (Stubby) is being used in theatre but what is the use of giving a patrols medic the carbine when they will be shooting across open fields in Afghanistan? You should also understand that Medics are expected to win the fire fight (if in the area) like every other member of the section before treatment is given (tactical awareness/care under fire) - obviously they are not going to take the role of assualting fire team but it is better to have a heavy concentration of fire (supress the enemy) than a medic sat picking their nose while everyone else is in the fight.

The carbine is being used by many different people from dog handlers, Medics on Helis (MERT) and big wig officers who usually have RMP CP who use the M16 Carbine. SF do not use the Carbine (Stubby).

The stubby has a huge flash and a bit more of a kick to it and more dangerous due to its shortened barrel (waving it about).
 
#14
According to Soldier mag, the Stubby K was desiged for the RAC, but several other Corps looked in to it. These were, IIRC, the RE, RLC and RAMC. I am under the impresion that the weapon is more than capable of meeting the requirements of these Corps AND are short enough to allow better use in vehicles, etc. Whether other Corps apart from the RAC will take them on is another matter.

They are practically identical in all ways to their bigger brothers, the Rifle and the LSW, so a soldier should be able to swap between the 3 with ease (over a period of time, not as in "today i´ll take hat one").

In this case a CMT in a veh could carry a K (ie Ambulane/MERT), in the event of them being employed in a less than vehcular sense, he could be armed with a long.

Regards the barrel length, I can´t see how it makes the weapon more dangerous, it isn´t the same as a pistol, the weapon will still be fired from the shoulder.

The original design for SA 80 included a carbine version, as does the Steyr AUG family (a 9mm SMG version). But for some reason the Carbine was not taken on to service until the A2.

The only picture of an A1 style carbine I can find is this one, although I am dbious about it, given the position of the mag. Bordering on the belief it is complete gash. Why change thet bullpup design to get a short barrel with such a large weapon?

from http://www.militaryimages.net/forums/showthread.php?t=105&page=2

I´d imagine you´d get arm cramp holding the pistol grip so close to the shoulder!!!! Any onet ell if it is some sort of photo shop job?


Alledgedly a member of the RM FPG, with a L22 A1. The jacket he is wearing is the new crewman jacket, designed to compleent the carbine.
From http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=76881&page=5
 
#16
Why yes Vale I have been on ops recently, and was given an LSW as my personal weapon. When I wasn;t driving I used my LSW, or a minimi or sometimes a gimpy, depending on the job we were doing.

None of the dog handlers I worked with used it. None of the medics I escorted on the helicopters used it. The generals MP CP team certainly didn't use M16 carbines (I assume you mean the M4) as they had Gucci H&K's.

The only time I saw one was with a Chally crew, as this is how there were designed for. As for a capbadged member of the RAMC winning a fire fight your haveing a laugh aren't you? They arn't allowed to go around slotting folk unless they or the casualty in their care is in danger, or are you suggesting that an infantry team medic should be armed with a carbine weapon?
 
#18
Bobath I think you'll find that the carbine wasn't designed specifically for tankies it was designed as a weapon to be used in a confined space. I also know that medics don't routinely use them, I merely stated that given the results of a trial they would be worth considering for use by medics. As for not poking anyone with a rifle how tall are you? One of the facts of life about the medics is that we have lots of short girlies, in my mind anything that increases the combat effectiveness of what we are given to work with should be embraced otherwise we might as well put on the red coats and shakos and form square! Incidentally thankyou pointing out that the medic should only fire in self defence or defence of a patient, it adds weight to my argument that a smaller weapon with a shorter range designed for personal defence would be appropriate for a medic (remember the SMG anyone?). Also no an Infantry team medic should not carry carbine as they are Infantiers, do not wear the red cross and therefore are not subject to the same rules of engagement. You're also probably going to tell me that medics in Afghanistan don't wear red crosses, that is the exception rather than the rule and we should always be looking to the bigger picture rather than getting trapped into a mindset by what we are doing now. I think that should just about cover everything.
 

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