RAND report - The Air War Against The Islamic State

Yokel

LE
RAND: The Air War Against The Islamic State - The role Of Airpower In Operation Inherent Resolve

Key Findings
  • Airpower played a critical role in Operation Inherent Resolve, based on the "by, with, and through" strategy, which placed local partners as leaders of the fight to destroy the caliphate. In turn, partners' capabilities and interests shaped how airpower was used.
  • Although more-aggressive air operations might have slightly accelerated the defeat of ISIS, they are unlikely to have significantly altered the timeline.
  • The deep fight in Operation Inherent Resolve affected ISIS's finances, but it could not affect ISIS's main center of gravity—territory—meaning that strategic attack did not play a decisive role in this operation.
  • Critical enablers, such as remotely piloted aircraft and aerial refueling aircraft, were in high demand and provided vital capabilities but were at times overstretched.
  • Essential wartime skills, such as deliberate-targeting and defensive counterair operations, were used for the first time in years in a real operation, requiring reinvigoration of these proficiencies.
  • Battlespace management within the Operation Inherent Resolve coalition was a point of disagreement, particularly between the Combined Joint Task Force Commander and the Combined Air Forces Component Commander, and affected the development of the deep fight.
  • Necessary efforts to prevent civilian casualties and reduce collateral damage depleted precision-guided munition stockpiles.
Recommendations
  • The joint force should revise its targeting doctrine based on the experience in Operation Inherent Resolve, including potentially incorporating the strike cell construct into doctrine or determining whether to use the Joint Air Ground Integration Center to integrate airpower with ground partners in the absence of forward joint terminal attack controllers.
  • The joint force should reinvigorate, reexamine, and revise the target-development process to make it more efficient.
  • The joint force should modify the allocation process for high-demand assets in joint campaigns to reduce inefficiencies and increase agility.
  • The joint force should reexamine battlespace management and revise doctrine or tactics, techniques, and procedures so that it can more dynamically manage both the close and the deep fights.
  • The Air Force will need to limit civilian casualties and collateral damage, requiring it to allocate precision-guided munitions efficiently across theaters and identify how to safely use second- and third-choice munitions.
  • The Air Force should continue to develop more targeteers and intelligence professionals to support a reinvigoration of the target-development process.
  • Self-defense rules of engagement in air-to-air operations should be stressed to airmen in training and real-world flying events. Leaders should emphasize to airmen that they are empowered and expected to defend the airspace, while avoiding inadvertent escalation.
 

BarcelonaAnalPark

LE
Book Reviewer
Did Assad actually try to engage allied aircraft?
With what? They tried engaging with Israeli planes with their best & most modern SAM's & hit nothing. I'd be suprised if they had any planes or pilots left after ISIS had finished overrunning their airbases & filming themselves beheading rows of pilots.

ISIS had a real nightmare with airpower but for all the precision weapons used, the main problems are extant and now there's the added problem of rebuilding all the towns that got flattened during the campaign.
 
With what? They tried engaging with Israeli planes with their best & most modern SAM's & hit nothing. I'd be suprised if they had any planes or pilots left after ISIS had finished overrunning their airbases & filming themselves beheading rows of pilots.

ISIS had a real nightmare with airpower but for all the precision weapons used, the main problems are extant and now there's the added problem of rebuilding all the towns that got flattened during the campaign.

Hence the question

The report specifically calls out defensive counter air and air-to-air ROE
 

BarcelonaAnalPark

LE
Book Reviewer
Hence the question

The report specifically calls out defensive counter air and air-to-air ROE
Coalition planes weren't the only people above Syria. The Russians were running their own ops & I presume there was civ / Mil flights crossing into Syrian airspace from Iran which would have been difficult to coordinate on a normal day.

The Turks ended up shooting down a Russian plane & the Syrian's shot down a Russian sigint plane during an Israeli raid.

Loads of stuff going on that those magnificent men (including 2SLGBTQQA±) will have had to deal with on the wing.

Whilst all this was going on, Assad's air force was pushing barrel bombs out of the back of helicopters & running prisons.
 

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