Raising a sunken boat.

AfghanAndy

On ROPS
On ROPs
#41
I guess this is an unusual DIY job, but think this is the best place to put it.

It looks like I am about to be tasked with raising a sunken cabin cruiser, I will try to post a picture in a while.

It has sunk on a mooring, and is only partially submerged.

It has gone down by the stern, and is held in place by the mooring ropes.

I have heard that it is possible to raise a semi submerged boat using a sheet of ply, a tarpaulin and one or two pumps.

The idea being that you place the sheet of ply over the open deck, place the tarpaulin over the ply, with weights to pull it as close as possible to the hull.

The theory being that as you displace the internal water, it pulls the tarpaulin tight against the hull and ply sheet, and provided you can pump water fast enough, it should raise the boat.

Whilst I appreciate that this is an army forum, I know that there is a wealth of knowledge here, and hope to avail myself of it.
I saw a film once where they sealed the hold hatch with canvas and tar and pumped the water out using compressors.

The also managed to use landing craft to tow her into harbour

On a more serious note, unless your plan is to lift the bed out with a crane you’ll have to seal the hole from below the water. Please be f*cking careful if you’re trying that by yourself.
 
#48
Tell the police maddie was hiding in it
Tell the police you saw some dusky chaps muttering "Alan's snackbar" and hiding a few backpacks in it. Plod will blow it smithereens for free. You might want to put a couple of backpacks in it first though, to make it look pukka.
 
#49
Most of his documentary films are 90% searching for the boat (building up suspense) and 10% filming what they find. Knowing where the boat is might kill the tension. Does it contain lost Nazi gold or anything that creates suspense?
Looking at the boat, I think it might contain niche grot mags, lots of black nasty, a well used ball pein hammer, a couple of posidrives, and a selection of pvc gimp masks.
 
#51
Civvy Scum's facecious post got me thinking.......

Do you know the theory on draining a partially flooded sailing dinghy? As long as it's capable of making headway, the two bungs in the stern are opened and (most) of the water flows out.

If the boat is still partially bouyant and you have something with enough grunt to tow it, opening a couple of holes in the stern may do it.

However, this only a theory, and I refuse to be held responsible for the outcome.
Cheeky bugger. The OP said he wanted it off his mooring. My way is quick and simple and just as valid as the others. As far as getting the mooring cleared goes at least. The sunken tub then becomes someone else's problem, job jobbed. Maritime fly-tipping if you will.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#52
Sir Lew Grade once said, "Probably cheaper to drain the Atlantic."
 
#54
Firstly, could you not have made the image smaller, as I can still make out it's Boaty McBoatface outline.

Secondly, is that thing inboard or outboard power? 'Cos, if outboard I really can't figure out how the bollox it got to that state.

If it's inboard and on a shaft or shafts, then there's an awful lot of hull breaches that go with it: prop(s), rudder(s), etc which means that something major has failed. If an outboard, is the bloody thing still attached: if so, that needs to come off before you do anything else.

Bilge pump failure? Could be but that's a big ask: even a boat that age should have at least 2 automatic bilge pumps that kick in through float switches.

Whatever it is, a diver needs to get down there to hopefully see WTF is going on.
 
#55
@Schmoe

You need to get on Canal World Discussion Forum. There is a chap on there, (amongst others), CarlT who has raised many boats. They will be be very generous with technical advice and you never know... some of the more hands on adventurous types on there may even offer to help with equipment and time.

Alternatively, just buy a real ale quaffing narrow boat owner with a 70ft steel boat a pint or two of finest Weasel Wangler to ’bump' into it a little too enthusiastically a couple of times. The splintered wreckage of the 'yogurt pot’ cabin cruiser will drift away with the current.
 
#56
The boat itself is trash, but as it’s on my mooring, I want it up and gone.

I once had a domestic heating oil tank to be removed. I was quoted 2.5K, talk of cranes and teams of men. It cost me an afternoon and about 20 quids worth of blades for a reciprocating saw. Simples.
 
#57
@Schmoe

You need to get on Canal World Discussion Forum. There is a chap on there, (amongst others), CarlT who has raised many boats. They will be be very generous with technical advice and you never know... some of the more hands on adventurous types on there may even offer to help with equipment and time.

Alternatively, just buy a real ale quaffing narrow boat owner with a 70ft steel boat a pint or two of finest Weasel Wangler to ’bump into it a little too enthusiastically a couple of times. The splintered wreckage of the 'yogurt pot’ cabin cruiser will drift away with the current.
Thanks, will head over there now.
 
#59

I once had a domestic heating oil tank to be removed. I was quoted 2.5K, talk of cranes and teams of men. It cost me an afternoon and about 20 quids worth of blades for a reciprocating saw. Simples.
Will that work under water? H2O and the devils magic do not usually mix
 
#60
I guess this is an unusual DIY job, but think this is the best place to put it.

It looks like I am about to be tasked with raising a sunken cabin cruiser, I will try to post a picture in a while.

It has sunk on a mooring, and is only partially submerged.

It has gone down by the stern, and is held in place by the mooring ropes.

I have heard that it is possible to raise a semi submerged boat using a sheet of ply, a tarpaulin and one or two pumps.

The idea being that you place the sheet of ply over the open deck, place the tarpaulin over the ply, with weights to pull it as close as possible to the hull.

The theory being that as you displace the internal water, it pulls the tarpaulin tight against the hull and ply sheet, and provided you can pump water fast enough, it should raise the boat.

Whilst I appreciate that this is an army forum, I know that there is a wealth of knowledge here, and hope to avail myself of it.

You started this thread, and are now morally bound to post a video of the whole recovery operation

Archie
 

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