Rail Strike Cancelled

#2
Network Rail = Government.

Government gives these c**s 3.2% plus loads of extras (increased London allowance, increased travel subsidies, etc).

Remind me again, what did the BLiar government give to the Army? 3% and increased food and accommodation charges the next week.

The English language does not have the vocabluary to express my utter disgust of Liarbour.
 
#3
I'm glad it's cancelled as the 1st strike and then the date of the possible 2nd would have seriously messed my plans up. However these people don't deserve any extra pay for sitting around on their arrses all day, and for their pay increase to be above that of serving soldiers is a disgrace. Network rail needs to get a grip.

I also have issues with the announcements being made yesterday at railways stations about the potential strike "we hope that network rail can reach some solution" etc etc. I'm sorry but WHO'S ON STRIKE??? Management aren't on strike and it's up to the union to come to a resolution as they called their members out on strike.

Someone needs to get a grip of the RMT, they go out on strike for the smallest reasons (not being consulted when a member was fired for being a c**t at his job, so the whole underground walks out). A 35 hour working week? A private's on what, just over £12k per year? They can do more than 35 hours work in under two days, this government and the population as a large needs to get some idea of perspective. Why is it that those most valued members of public service (soldiers, teachers and others involved in education etc etc) are paid tuppence when some tube driver gets £30k for sitting in a cab where all the computers means he/she can't physically mess up their job????


Edited for excessive pointless profanity PTP
 
#4
ON strike? i thought they had been on strike since the first track was laid??
 
#5
crabby said:
I'm glad it's cancelled as the 1st strike and then the date of the possible 2nd would have seriously messed my plans up. However these people don't deserve any extra pay for sitting around on their arrses all day, and for their pay increase to be above that of serving soldiers is a disgrace. Network rail needs to get a grip.

I also have issues with the announcements being made yesterday at railways stations about the potential strike "we hope that network rail can reach some solution" etc etc. I'm sorry but WHO'S ON STRIKE??? Management aren't on strike and it's up to the union to come to a resolution as they called their members out on strike.

Someone needs to get a grip of the RMT, they go out on strike for the smallest reasons (not being consulted when a member was fired for being a c**t at his job, so the whole underground walks out). A 35 hour working week? A private's on what, just over £12k per year? They can do more than 35 hours work in under two days, this government and the population as a large needs to get some idea of perspective. Why is it that those most valued members of public service (soldiers, teachers and others involved in education etc etc) are paid tuppence when some tube driver gets £30k for sitting in a cab where all the computers means he/she can't physically mess up their job????


Edited for excessive pointless profanity PTP
Crabby, you have demonstrated a total ignorance of what any of the jobs entale.

FYI weekly hours are governed by the Hidden Report. Also I wouldn't trust the average private to to these jobs either.
 
#6
Recce19 said:
Also I wouldn't trust the average private to to these jobs either.
Correct: the average Tom would be overqualified and bored stupid.

Yes there is a lot of responsibility being the controller of a vehicle with several hundred people aboard, however to drive a 16 gear articulated lorry requires more skill than that of a tube driver. They have one of the most militant unions left in the UK and a pathetically weak management (the government) that always caves into the 'brothers' wishes. They are nothing but greedy communist scum.
 
#7
Dread said:
Recce19 said:
Also I wouldn't trust the average private to to these jobs either.
Correct: the average Tom would be overqualified and bored stupid.

Yes there is a lot of responsibility being the controller of a vehicle with several hundred people aboard, however to drive a 16 gear articulated lorry requires more skill than that of a tube driver. They have one of the most militant unions left in the UK and a pathetically weak management (the government) that always caves into the 'brothers' wishes. They are nothing but greedy communist scum.
Whoops, missed the TUBE driver bit, thought you meant raiway driver.
 
#8
Tube driver: rumble along pre-designated routes. Stop when the computer tells you or when the red light tells you. Speed is limited by the computer. Apart from telling people to mind the gap and let people get off before trying to embark, it isnt the most difficult of tasks which is why the union is so militant: the drivers have nothing to do all day except think of ways of shafting their boss!
 
#9
Dread said:
Tube driver: rumble along pre-designated routes. Stop when the computer tells you or when the red light tells you. Speed is limited by the computer. Apart from telling people to mind the gap and let people get off before trying to embark, it isnt the most difficult of tasks which is why the union is so militant: the drivers have nothing to do all day except think of ways of shafting their boss!
That's why I said whoops :D

Proper train drivers have a 'little' bt moer to do do :wink:
 
#11
I know a retired senior civil enginner. He's supervised many a railways' construction and still gets dragged out of retirement to advise and he maintains that train drivers exsist to keep the 'Travelers' happy.
There is no serious Engineering Requirement for a man at the controls.
john
Expert comments only please.
 
#12
jonwilly said:
Expert comments only please.
Yes. Because a predominately military site has an over abundance of people with in depth knowledge of the railway infrastructure and governance. Well done you for being stipulate about who should post opinions.

That said, there is a vast amount of information surrounding the results of driver errors resulting in rail accidents that stem directly from the control software not being fit for purpose. If the infrastructure cannot guarantee a green light and a red light are not confused, it can hardly be left in control of the train locomotion. If you can find me a complex computor system that is proven error free I'd be mightly surprised.
 
#13
Come on then, using this vast amount of information, how many of these accidents - resulting directly from driver error caused by the "control software" - can you name ? Is it less than 1 ?

Flip
 
#14
Flipper_T_Rox said:
Come on then, using this vast amount of information, how many of these accidents - resulting directly from driver error caused by the "control software" - can you name ? Is it less than 1 ?

Flip
I was on the District line travelling from Victoria to Gloucester Road and our tube was held at Sloane Square because the tube in front, also on the District Line, had found its way onto the Circle Line at the points beyond South Kensington. The offending train was reversed up the line and points correctly changed to allow it back on to the District road.

I doubt the driver controlling the offending train had any cab control about where his train was taking him.

Mind you I am mightily p!ssed off by the RMT repeatedly striking. Bob Crow, who looks exactly what he is, needs a slapping from the travelling public who don't give a sh!t about Union cobbled disorder and only want to go to work. The RMT need to take note of what British Leyland workers did to Red Robbo [Derek Robinson - convenor] in the mid 1970s and have a replay with Bob Crow.

Mind you - tomorrow off would have been rather nice.
 
#15
You're not getting it are you? The union exists to get it's members the best pay and working conditions that are possible, so far from Bob Crow getting a"slap", he should get all the plaudits going! You have to wake up and realise that the world outside of the army is somewhat different to life on the inside. Industrial action is the only language that management understand, and used wisely and with careful consideration, it can benefit both the employee and customer/public in terms of better service and safety.
 
#16
scorchio_markio said:
You're not getting it are you? The union exists to get it's members the best pay and working conditions that are possible, so far from Bob Crow getting a"slap", he should get all the plaudits going! You have to wake up and realise that the world outside of the army is somewhat different to life on the inside. Industrial action is the only language that management understand, and used wisely and with careful consideration, it can benefit both the employee and customer/public in terms of better service and safety.



Oh Fuck its back -don't feed it anyone.

By the way I only put this up as Tpt info for the weekend but there are some interesting points made
 
#17
mukhabarat2003 said:
I was on the District line travelling from Victoria to Gloucester Road and our tube was held at Sloane Square because the tube in front, also on the District Line, had found its way onto the Circle Line at the points beyond South Kensington. The offending train was reversed up the line and points correctly changed to allow it back on to the District road.

I doubt the driver controlling the offending train had any cab control about where his train was taking him.
Heh, whilst this isn't a completely unknown occurence it is by no means unsafe. Possibly a mistake by the signaller (it happens), but certainly not a failure of any form of control or signalling system. And whilst it is true that the driver has no say over the route set for him, he is quite within his rights to stop and challenge it if he thinks an error may have been made.

Flip
 
#18
Flipper_T_Rox said:
mukhabarat2003 said:
I was on the District line travelling from Victoria to Gloucester Road and our tube was held at Sloane Square because the tube in front, also on the District Line, had found its way onto the Circle Line at the points beyond South Kensington. The offending train was reversed up the line and points correctly changed to allow it back on to the District road.

I doubt the driver controlling the offending train had any cab control about where his train was taking him.
Heh, whilst this isn't a completely unknown occurence it is by no means unsafe. Possibly a mistake by the signaller (it happens), but certainly not a failure of any form of control or signalling system. And whilst it is true that the driver has no say over the route set for him, he is quite within his rights to stop and challenge it if he thinks an error may have been made.

Flip
Main line drivers must know their routes inside out. They must know where all the signals, crossings etc are also where all the breaking points are. Whilst driving a said workings, the driver must check his route to ensure that the signaller has not wrong-routed him/her. if he/she has been, then they must stop. He must also know all the stoppping points for his service, ie is it a 4-car, 8-car or a 12- car train Bearing in mind an average 4-car unit weighs about 164 tonnes and takes 3 qtrs of a mile to stop in emergency breaking. He must be tested on his/her 'rules' every year, these are about 4 inches thick on double sided A5 paper. On top of that he/she must hold a PTS qualification, basic fire fighting, basic 1st aid etc.

Learning to drive a car or lorry is a piece of p*ss in comparrison.
 
#19
Recce19 said:
Flipper_T_Rox said:
mukhabarat2003 said:
I was on the District line travelling from Victoria to Gloucester Road and our tube was held at Sloane Square because the tube in front, also on the District Line, had found its way onto the Circle Line at the points beyond South Kensington. The offending train was reversed up the line and points correctly changed to allow it back on to the District road.

I doubt the driver controlling the offending train had any cab control about where his train was taking him.
Heh, whilst this isn't a completely unknown occurence it is by no means unsafe. Possibly a mistake by the signaller (it happens), but certainly not a failure of any form of control or signalling system. And whilst it is true that the driver has no say over the route set for him, he is quite within his rights to stop and challenge it if he thinks an error may have been made.

Flip
Main line drivers must know their routes inside out. They must know where all the signals, crossings etc are also where all the breaking points are. Whilst driving a said workings, the driver must check his route to ensure that the signaller has not wrong-routed him/her. if he/she has been, then they must stop. He must also know all the stoppping points for his service, ie is it a 4-car, 8-car or a 12- car train Bearing in mind an average 4-car unit weighs about 164 tonnes and takes 3 qtrs of a mile to stop in emergency breaking. He must be tested on his/her 'rules' every year, these are about 4 inches thick on double sided A5 paper. On top of that he/she must hold a PTS qualification, basic fire fighting, basic 1st aid etc.

Learning to drive a car or lorry is a piece of p*ss in comparrison.
I have no problem with most train driver's and their pay. However, a tube driver, who has pretty much fail-safe electronics, gets £30k a year. A newly qualified teacher in London gets £23k (£19k elsewhere). Is that proportionate?

My problem is the RMT trying to flex their muscles to make sure their members earn more and more with less and less working hours - nice idea to a point. I am all for unions protecting worker's rights and conditions - but if someone told you that by striking on new years eve you could earn yourself an extra £2k a year most would do it. Essentially it's greediness on the part of the RMT and its members - which translates into action on specific days normally chosen to have maximum impact. Given the size of the union and their potential to call the whole union out on strike they have more barginning power.

I'd also have you consider the requirements for an infantry private on his £12kish per year. He has to pass all his ITDs every year - including the APWT where he has to be able to apply knowledge of round trajectory, height, distance and wind within a split second sometimes - also whilst adjusting his aim for differing firing positions. He has to know his NBC inside out. I could go on. And those serving could fill in with everything else an infanteer has to learn by heart and pass every year - as well as the potential to be sent somewhere hot and sandy to get stoned/shot/bombed for a government that couldn't give a sh*t.

Basically my point is the RMT and many other unions are headed by money-grabbers who are intent on their members earning disproportionate wages with a 35 hour working week - that will see our public sector go the route of British Coal, British Leyland and British Steel.
 
#20
crabby said:
Recce19 said:
Flipper_T_Rox said:
mukhabarat2003 said:
I was on the District line travelling from Victoria to Gloucester Road and our tube was held at Sloane Square because the tube in front, also on the District Line, had found its way onto the Circle Line at the points beyond South Kensington. The offending train was reversed up the line and points correctly changed to allow it back on to the District road.

I doubt the driver controlling the offending train had any cab control about where his train was taking him.
Heh, whilst this isn't a completely unknown occurence it is by no means unsafe. Possibly a mistake by the signaller (it happens), but certainly not a failure of any form of control or signalling system. And whilst it is true that the driver has no say over the route set for him, he is quite within his rights to stop and challenge it if he thinks an error may have been made.

Flip
Main line drivers must know their routes inside out. They must know where all the signals, crossings etc are also where all the breaking points are. Whilst driving a said workings, the driver must check his route to ensure that the signaller has not wrong-routed him/her. if he/she has been, then they must stop. He must also know all the stoppping points for his service, ie is it a 4-car, 8-car or a 12- car train Bearing in mind an average 4-car unit weighs about 164 tonnes and takes 3 qtrs of a mile to stop in emergency breaking. He must be tested on his/her 'rules' every year, these are about 4 inches thick on double sided A5 paper. On top of that he/she must hold a PTS qualification, basic fire fighting, basic 1st aid etc.

Learning to drive a car or lorry is a piece of p*ss in comparrison.
I have no problem with most train driver's and their pay. However, a tube driver, who has pretty much fail-safe electronics, gets £30k a year. A newly qualified teacher in London gets £23k (£19k elsewhere). Is that proportionate?

My problem is the RMT trying to flex their muscles to make sure their members earn more and more with less and less working hours - nice idea to a point. I am all for unions protecting worker's rights and conditions - but if someone told you that by striking on new years eve you could earn yourself an extra £2k a year most would do it. Essentially it's greediness on the part of the RMT and its members - which translates into action on specific days normally chosen to have maximum impact. Given the size of the union and their potential to call the whole union out on strike they have more barginning power.

I'd also have you consider the requirements for an infantry private on his £12kish per year. He has to pass all his ITDs every year - including the APWT where he has to be able to apply knowledge of round trajectory, height, distance and wind within a split second sometimes - also whilst adjusting his aim for differing firing positions. He has to know his NBC inside out. I could go on. And those serving could fill in with everything else an infanteer has to learn by heart and pass every year - as well as the potential to be sent somewhere hot and sandy to get stoned/shot/bombed for a government that couldn't give a sh*t.

Basically my point is the RMT and many other unions are headed by money-grabbers who are intent on their members earning disproportionate wages with a 35 hour working week - that will see our public sector go the route of British Coal, British Leyland and British Steel.
Crabby, I was in for 13.5 years so I know what you're talking about.

Main line drivers are ASLEF, but I must agree withyou on the RMT.

I don't know anything about driving the tube trains, but I can tell you that ASLEF is needed for the main line drivers. A system of points on your licence, was introduced to flag up drivers who needed supervision for any number of reasons - not all safety related. This was turned around by some DM's (driver managers) as a means of sacking a driver or ensuring that he would not go to another company. This is why unions are still required. A good union will work together with both the employer and the employee, in fact it makes it easier for large companies this way.

Sadly, in this money-orientated world, industrial action that loses the company money, is the only thing they listen to. Remember, when people go on strike, they do not get any pay or benefits, so it's in every ones interest to not go down this route.

*get's off soap box and breathes*
 

Similar threads