RAF turned down chance to buy F117 Stealth Fighters

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by jim30, Jan 3, 2017.

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  1. A really interesting pair of articles here, showing how the US offered the RAF Stealth Fighters in the 80s and 90s as a GR4 replacement. Presumably the answer 'no' came about because the realisation was that to do so would kill the UK aerospace industry, and Typhoon and actually do more long term damage to UK interests than would be gained. But a fascinating bit of work (and a good reason why I do rather like the Guardian when its not in self righteous morally preachy and never wrong (or as I like to call it JohnG) mode).

    Keep the French in the dark: Thatcher's secret push for US military technology

    In 1986 U.S. President Ronald Reagan offered Britain the F-117 stealth jet
     
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  2. Is that 'offered' in the same vein that killed off the TSR-2 project?

    Once bitten and all that...
     
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  3. Dollsteeth

    Dollsteeth On ROPs

    I wonder if the beneficial friends relationship between heads of state will ever exist like that again.
    Perhaps it's partially the cause of more recent PMs snivelling around their US counterparts?
     
  4. Do you honestly believe that Heads of State being friends would get in the way of American business interests :eek:
     
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  5. Dollsteeth

    Dollsteeth On ROPs

    Do I think deals like the above would have happened as readily without the relationship that MT and RR had you mean?

    ETA after all, we aren't talking about a bit of kit like F35, entwined to business.
     
  6. There have been stories going around for some years that the MoD was offered AH-64s in the 80s, but the Army in its wisdom decided that thick soldiers would be unable to cope with the complexities of the machine.

    There ensued a 20+ year battle between the Army and the RAF over who could operate such machines.
     
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  7. The F117 was a very niche product. I'm not be surprised the RAF didn't see the value in dedicating scarce money on a handful of them when that money could be more productively used elsewhere.
     
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  8. What earthly good would they have been?
     
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  9. Dollsteeth

    Dollsteeth On ROPs

    You are missing the point I was enquiring about, how much of the above deal was 'business' and how much was as a result of their relationship and as a result our ties between nations?

    This is what I was asking.
     
  10. A2_Matelot

    A2_Matelot LE Book Reviewer

    I've not read the article but I'd say that the RAF would have looked at the requirements the US would have undoubtedly insisted upon for F117 operation, plus the additional operating and logistical requirements/costs and decided that more conventional airframes would have sufficed, and been more affordable. The F117 was operational in the USAF inventory for years before Joe Bloggs realised it was there, not sure we could have kept that level of OPSEC.
     
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  11. There was method in the apparent madness.
    Buying into F-117 would have gotten us a stealth aircraft, but they would have been supplied on a very short US leash with no technology transfer.

    The game was to sit at the top table as partners, not the Minime.

    And so begat REPLICA to demonstrate to the cousins we knew as much as them and that ended up with us as design partners on the F-35.

    FWIW: we were also offered the F-22 back in the day.
     
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  12. The Yanks can afford highly specialised aircraft for single role - SEAD, EW etc, we can't. Buy into F-117 and go without x, what would we have been expected to bin first?
     
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  13. The F-117 had such a short life in service it seems it was almost obsolete as it went into service (I think it was effectively more of a demonstration aircraft an "advanced prototype" for stealth technology) it would have been a poor investment for the UK.
     
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