RAF Trooper flights

#1
I remember my first trooper flight to RAF Gutesloh in 1991 and was surprised that the seats faced backwards. An officer was moved to the seat number 1A which was nearest the tail and told that they would command the survivors in case the plane crashed but I can't remember what the term was - Flight Commander? Or something else? Really bothering me that I can't remember this sort of detail.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#3
When we flew out of Akrotiri in March 77 after six months with UNFICYP, we shared the plane with some legends whose name escapes me (The Bachelors, I remember) who'd been doing a gig.

The Steward gave a talk about stuff you'll never need like emergency drills cos no Air Trooper had been lost.

All I could hear was Billy Connolly telling me that sitting facing the back would most definitely save our lives if we flew into a mountain at 600mph. Sarcastically.
 
#4
rear-facing seats go back a long way.
The were also required of the civilian aircraft in the sixties that were used for air trooping- typically long-haul were Britannias of British United, British Eagle, and Caledonian.
Apparently the airlines wanted all civilian flights to have rear-facing seats but the fare-paying passengers weren't too keen on the idea.
 
#9
I remember my first trooper flight to RAF Gutesloh in 1991 and was surprised that the seats faced backwards. An officer was moved to the seat number 1A which was nearest the tail and told that they would command the survivors in case the plane crashed but I can't remember what the term was - Flight Commander? Or something else? Really bothering me that I can't remember this sort of detail.
OC Pax and he would have been given a file with the passenger manifest (ranks, names, numbers and units).
OC Pax was not necessarily the most senior officer on the flight - Maj or below (or equivalent ).
If there was no service officer on the flight the role was taken by the most senior civilian with officer rank equivalence - i.e. BFES teacher or other civil servant.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#10
OC Pax and he would have been given a file with the passenger manifest (ranks, names, numbers and units).
OC Pax was not necessarily the most senior officer on the flight - Maj or below (or equivalent ).
If there was no service officer on the flight the role was taken by the most senior civilian with officer rank equivalence - i.e. BFES teacher or other civil servant.
I've had a flashback to GMF's account of being OC Train from Cairo to Jerusalem. I'd dig out The Complete MacAuslan again, but it's only a few months since I read it. Give it a while yet.
 
#11
I remember my first trooper flight to RAF Gutesloh in 1991 and was surprised that the seats faced backwards. An officer was moved to the seat number 1A which was nearest the tail and told that they would command the survivors in case the plane crashed but I can't remember what the term was - Flight Commander? Or something else? Really bothering me that I can't remember this sort of detail.
What would have happened if the plane had backed into a mountain?
 
#14
Left the mil in 2013 and last year i "returned" by flying down to Falklands on RAF flight for some work.
Sitting at Brize and a woman shouted out in the departures stating she was the senior rep for the flight down there. I assume she was an officer as we were all in civilians but as the majority of the flight was made up of Islanders flying down i wondered if indeed there was a need.
 

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