RAF transfer

#1
Can a young army officer transfer into the RAF without having to do the 7 months training? If so what are the procedures that one would have to proceed through to transfer. Is there anyone in particular that I should speak to who would know whilst obviously keeping my anonymity.
 
#5
boredryder said:
In the final term - will be commisioning early April
Cant see why you shouldnt have to do the training, I mean its not as though you have any 'Real' time in is it??? suggest you try joining a Regt and getting at least one or two CR's in first!!!.............

Just a point, but why didn't you join the RAF in the first place???
 
#7
Im always kind....

boredryder, you will need to speak to the crabs direct I think. They can be quite **** on these matters. Even RAF SNCOs with 22+ years who get commisioned have to do quite a lengthy course. I believe they are taught how to wear white socks with plastic slip on shoes correctly and the how to iron their crimpoline blazers without melting them.

And...why didn't you go crab first off? And what do you want to do in Crab Air?
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#8
For the 'Air' perspective, as against 'Aviation', why not pose your question on PpRuNe? Their Military Forum is chock-full of experts, especially if you aspire to RAF Regiment, RAF Police, Admin or Movements
 
#12
Living proof that the soldier and officer selection procedure isnt robust enough to weed out the chaff from modern society..

finish training you crow, then gob off, have the courage of your convictions
 
#14
Technically you are not yet an Army officer, but that is besides the point. I know of several individuals who transferred to the RAF when they were Captains and they still had to go through Initial Officer Training (Cranwell). However, one I happened to bump into shortly after he finished it confirmed what everyone had always suspected - that RAF officer training is something of a joke compared to Sandhurst. Before you do decide to jump ship, you should consider this very old saying that neatly summarises the differences between officers in the three Services:

In the Navy, there are officers pretending to be gentlemen;
In the Army, there are gentlemen pretending to be officers;
In the RAF, there are neither pretending to be both.

So if you want to hold the Queen's Commission but never lead men, and wear a uniform from C&A, then the RAF may well be for you.
 
#15
Why not finish your training do a few years in the army, then ask for a secondment to the raf?. Then you might find out that the grass isn't always greener, and if you like the look of it you'll know your doing the right thing.
 
#18
vaeviso said:
So if you want to hold the Queen's Commission but never lead men, and wear a uniform from C&A, then the RAF may well be for you.
I agree entirely.

The RAF would be a much better place if the officers kept themselves in the mess until a SNCO decided that it was ok for them to play with their planes for a bit, then when they get back on the ground straight back to the mess.

Actually, those lads over at 657 seem to have the right idea, their SNCO's actually do the flying. :wink:




THS - Ex-RGJ, current crab......
 
#20
Boredryer,
RAF Initial Officer Trg (IOT) has recently undergone a major change in structure. However, for many years commissioned officers transferring from another service or who had previous commissioned service were required to undergo a bespoke 'Special Entrant and Re-Entrant (SERE) Course'. RAF doctors, dentists and legal officers also used to complete SERE which was considerably shorter than the regular 26 week IOT (when I did IOT in 86/87 SERE was only 6 weeks long for guys with commissions from other services). Whilst I'm not entirely up to speed on Cranwell particulars, I believe that SERE still exists in one form or another. During professional trg additional officer trg is conducted according to branch prior to you being posted to your first tour.

Therefore, assuming you had completed RMA and your transfer application was successful (ie the Army agreed to let you go, and the RAF accepted you) you would most likely only be required to undergo SERE prior to professional trg.

Prior to any application however, may I make a few suggestions. If you bang in an application to change immediately after RMAS, the RAF may question your commitment. This is particularly the case if you apply for an RAF branch such as pilot where you'll be required to undergo lengthy, demanding and expensive trg. Additionally, the Army may refuse to a transfer, particularly given that there are many in the Army who are both prejudiced against and ignorant of the RAF. This happened to a good mate of mine who was commissioned into the RN but who decided to request a transfer to the RAF soon after Dartmouth. The RN refused. He was forced to resign his commission, and then faced a lengthy wait (12 months +) for his SERE. If he'd have then failed his RAF professional trg, it's unlikely the RN would have had him back. So think about what you'll do if you fail professional trg in the RAF.

Likewise, as suggested, you may first be better getting a tour under your belt in your chosen corps. If you still feel you wished to transfer, the RAF would be less inclined to doubt your commitment and - most importantly - you'd have given the Army a fair chance. I suspect that the 'real Army' is somewhat different to RMA, so don't rush into a decision.

What branch are you considering transferring to in the RAF? We are currently recruiting very few aircrew so your aptitude scores will need to be exceptional to be accepted. Therefore, if you want to fly, do not discount the AAC or FAA. If you're considering a ground branch, research your options and go on some visits. Several branches' career prospects are likely to diminish in the near future (eg RAF Regt and ATC).

Whatever you decide, only do so after considerable thought and research. If you wish to speak further, don't hesitate to PM me. Whatever you decide, good luck.

Regards,
MM

PS, not royalty are you?!!! :lol:
 

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