RAF REGIMENT & Armys Close Support Logistics Regiment.

#1
panthers
After Modifications, Panther Set for Afghan Duty
By andrew chuter
Published: 13 May 2009 07:39
LONDON - A new command and liaison vehicle has been declared operational with British troops in Afghanistan but only following a string of modifications to bring the platform up to the required theatre entry standard.

The Panther, built by Iveco Defence of Italy and fitted out by BAE Systems at its armored vehicle plant in Newcastle, has been extensively customized with more than a dozen changes to meet the requirements of current operations.

Among the significant modifications is the installation of a revised Bowman communications system, which allows the British to make room for a fourth crew member on the vehicle for its envisaged role in Afghanistan.

All the vehicles originally ordered by the British in 2003 were destined to be fitted with a full General Dynamics UK Bowman voice and data suite to meet the command and liaison role. That reduced expected crew numbers from four to three.

Now, however, a slimmed down Bowman system has been installed to meet the changing role requirements of the British forces in Afghanistan.

BAE said in a statement that the Panther had been modified to a "four–seat configuration with the Bowman digital communication system installed between the two rear seats."

The full command and liaison version of the Panther will continue to carry the larger communications fit and the reduced crew of three.

The MoD was unable to respond questions about the new austere Bowman fit.

Other modifications on Panther include provision of a rear view camera for improved situational awareness, a protected engine compartment, theatre-specific electronic devices to counter improvised explosive devices, larger roof hatches and a new rear cargo pod.

The first vehicles in theatre will be used by the Royal Air Force Regiment and the Army's Close Support Logistics Regiment.

Panther entered service with the British in June 2008s but this is the first time the vehicle has been deployed operationally. The vehicle has though been tested in Afghanistan and Oman.

BAE secured the order for 401 Panthers in 2003. Delivery of the last of those vehicles from the Newcastle factory of the company's Global Combat Systems business unit is expected in September.

Panther will replace a range of vehicles including some roles undertaken by the tracked CVR(T) reconnaissance platform, the FV430 tracked carrier and the Land Rover medium utility truck.
 

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#2
So it says it was tested in Afghanistan, but now has been deployed for the first time Operationally....in Afghanistan?? So i take by saying that it was driven around the perimeter fence of BASTION a few times? :roll:
 
#3
CH512O said:
So i take by saying that it was driven around the inside of the perimeter fence of BASTION a few times? :roll:
and will be for many years to come, the only thing the RAF regt can do!
 
#5
I was there in Bastion when it was tested- Out to Range Charlie, 800 rds rapid from the remote weapons platform and back in for lunch!

Well tested then! Guess thats why it is going to the above units first.

I've heard on on the job training but not on the job testing, sounds kind of foolish.
 
#7
wellard said:
CH512O said:
So i take by saying that it was driven around the inside of the perimeter fence of BASTION a few times? :roll:
and will be for many years to come, the only thing the RAF regt can do!
Hahahah! Stop it, my sides are hurting. No, they really are. LOL etc.

I want to know where we're recruiting the Oompalumpahs from to crew them. More importantly, do the fag lighters work?
 
#8
BAE secured the order for 401 Panthers in 2003. Delivery of the last of those vehicles from the Newcastle factory of the company's Global Combat Systems business unit is expected in September.
On the bright side the flash to bang time for a lash-up has come down quite a lot. A bit. Possibly.

At least it's beaten FRES onto the field...
 
#9
Quads.
Supacat.
That rediculous little ice cream van thing that's just been ordered.
Snatch.
Vixen.
Vector.
WMIK.
Viking.
Jackal.
Bushmaster.
Mastiff.
Now we have Panther!

Whilst I am not suggesting that my own Service should necessarily be held up as a Pantheon of procurement, could someone explain to this non specialist crustacean the thinking behind such apparently incoherent vehicle procurement? :?

Regards,
MM
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
Magic_Mushroom said:
Quads.
Supacat.
That rediculous little ice cream van thing that's just been ordered.
Snatch.
Vixen.
Vector.
WMIK.
Viking.
Jackal.
Bushmaster.
Mastiff.
Now we have Panther!

Whilst I am not suggesting that my own Service should necessarily be held up as a Pantheon of procurement, could someone explain to this non specialist crustacean the thinking behind such apparently incoherent vehicle procurement? :?

Regards,
MM
Panic buying?
Throwing money at a problem like they always do so the Goverment can claim they have invested £millions in protection systems regardless whether they work or not
 
#11
freedomman said:
wellard said:
CH512O said:
So i take by saying that it was driven around the inside of the perimeter fence of BASTION a few times? :roll:
and will be for many years to come, the only thing the RAF regt can do!
Hahahah! Stop it, my sides are hurting. No, they really are. LOL etc.

I want to know where we're recruiting the Oompalumpahs from to crew them. More importantly, do the fag lighters work?
The cigarette lighters will be disabled. It is important that operators of the vehicles can work in a safe, non-hazardous environment...
 
#12
the_boy_syrup said:
Magic_Mushroom said:
Quads.
Supacat.
That rediculous little ice cream van thing that's just been ordered.
Snatch.
Vixen.
Vector.
WMIK.
Viking.
Jackal.
Bushmaster.
Mastiff.
Now we have Panther!

Whilst I am not suggesting that my own Service should necessarily be held up as a Pantheon of procurement, could someone explain to this non specialist crustacean the thinking behind such apparently incoherent vehicle procurement? :?

Regards,
MM
Panic buying?
Throwing money at a problem like they always do so the Goverment can claim they have invested £millions in protection systems regardless whether they work or not
TVM TBS, I was afraid somebody would say that!

Regards,
MM
 
#15
jaybee2786 said:
Outstanding said:
jaybee2786 said:
[interesting jbee, where and why does your sqduadrons french eagle come from.?]
I always wondered where co ck in a frock had went too and here you are bang on time as per
Seriously though jaybee, where did it come from?
 
#16
Magic_Mushroom said:
Quads.
Supacat.
That rediculous little ice cream van thing that's just been ordered.
Snatch.
Vixen.
Vector.
WMIK.
Viking.
Jackal.
Bushmaster.
Mastiff.
Now we have Panther!

Whilst I am not suggesting that my own Service should necessarily be held up as a Pantheon of procurement, could someone explain to this non specialist crustacean the thinking behind such apparently incoherent vehicle procurement? :?

Regards,
MM
Because soldiers are fighting and dying right now and delaying deployment of a solution gets more young lads killed. Simple as that.

Besides, these things aren't fast jets, they're heavily based on commercial parts and most of them won't return from theatre as they'll be thoroughly shagged out by the hammering they'll get in service.
 
#17
Cpt_Darling said:
jaybee2786 said:
Outstanding said:
jaybee2786 said:
[interesting jbee, where and why does your sqduadrons french eagle come from.?]
I always wondered where co ck in a frock had went too and here you are bang on time as per
Seriously though jaybee, where did it come from?
They nicked it from the Free French at the great battle of the Mersah Matruh NAAFI in 1942. Get to grips with your military history, Darling, FFS!! :roll:
 
#18
One_of_the_strange said:
Because soldiers are fighting and dying right now and delaying deployment of a solution gets more young lads killed. Simple as that.

Besides, these things aren't fast jets, they're heavily based on commercial parts and most of them won't return from theatre as they'll be thoroughly shagged out by the hammering they'll get in service.
I well aware of those facts oots and when deployed on ops have travelled in some of the vehicles listed.

My point is that there is clearly significant overlap in capabilities and a more coherent procurement plan will enable more effective and economic development of applique armour, ECM and other add ons. In addition, some of the vehicles (notably Vector) hardly appear well suited to off roading and IED threats.

This is not a dig. I'm just genuinely attempting to understand such a wide spread of vehicles.

Regards,
MM
 
#19
Magic_Mushroom said:
One_of_the_strange said:
Because soldiers are fighting and dying right now and delaying deployment of a solution gets more young lads killed. Simple as that.

Besides, these things aren't fast jets, they're heavily based on commercial parts and most of them won't return from theatre as they'll be thoroughly shagged out by the hammering they'll get in service.
I well aware of those facts oots and when deployed on ops have travelled in some of the vehicles listed.

My point is that there is clearly significant overlap in capabilities and a more coherent procurement plan will enable more effective and economic development of applique armour, ECM and other add ons. In addition, some of the vehicles (notably Vector) hardly appear well suited to off roading and IED threats.

This is not a dig. I'm just genuinely attempting to understand such a wide spread of vehicles.

Regards,
MM
Coherent plans take time. Maybe DES should be able to slap together a cross-DLOD plan compliant with all relevant legislation quicker than they actually do, but until then UORs get vehicles into service quicker. And that means things are incoherent, and some UORs get it wrong as things are rushed (eg Vector). Add to that the very real pressure on budget that means FRES is a walking corpse and what other course of action is available ?

As to the range and types of vehicles we see, my take is that these are indicators of an Army adapting and changing as the nature of the conflict changes. We see quads and so on to load carry for dismounted infantry, mine protected vehicles for roads and convoys, off road "Mad Max" vehicles studded with guns for cross country and so on. Some will fail, some will excel - but the only data that matters comes from contacts not studies.

As to coherence, if you can get the spares quickly from commercial sources then who cares ? Like I said, I don't see many of the current fleet lasting long enough for obsolescence to cause issues.
 
#20
Panther is very well liked by a certain specialist RAF unit I know who have been testing and developing it for some time. It gives them far more capability then they have with their current vehicles - which is a damned fine thing for the rest of us.
Anything with a dog's name in the vehicle procurement world is pretty well linked up. I've had a good long chat with a fella right at the centre of that world and I'm really impressed - lots of commonality throughout the fleet, superlative manufacturer buy-in and a real life-saving difference on the ground.
 

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