RAF Reconnaissance in the Second World War

Yokel

LE
When I was a spotty teenage student the college library had a copy of a book called Deep Black - about (American) air and space reconnaissance systems and projects. It started with a chapter on history, and the efforts of the RAF in the Second World War and early Cold War were mentioned?

I am sure that the book mentioned that airborne radar was used for some experimental reconnaissance roles - does anyone know more?
 
The interesting thread reminded me of this (well-known) photograph:

IWM caption:

'Remarkable low-level oblique photographic-reconnaissance photograph taken over the German battleship TIRPITZ moored in Aasfjord, Norway, by a Supermarine Spitfire of No. 1 Photographic Reconnaissance Unit. The photograph was taken by Flight Lieutenant A P F Fane, a former racing car driver, from an altitude of 100 feet, and shows the central portion of the battleship aft of the bridge.'

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Col (Ret) Roy M Stanley has written a series of books about, primarily, the results of photo recon in WW2. His book -
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Weapons-Hu...efinements=p_27:Roy+M.+Stanley&s=books&sr=1-9
'V-Weapons hunt - defeating German Secret Weapons' really brings home the importance to that campaign in particular of photo recon.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
When I was a spotty teenage student the college library had a copy of a book called Deep Black - about (American) air and space reconnaissance systems and projects. It started with a chapter on history, and the efforts of the RAF in the Second World War and early Cold War were mentioned?

I am sure that the book mentioned that airborne radar was used for some experimental reconnaissance roles - does anyone know more?


IIRC some coastline mapping was by radar so that it could be compared to known maps.

This would then allow vessels like the LCT(R) to be accurately positioned on DDay
 

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