RAF pilots relive crash landing

#1
Two Tornado pilots have spoken of their relief after walking away from a 165mph crash landing at RAF Lossiemouth.

Flight Lieutenant Pete Walker and navigator, Flying Officer Kev Gatland, escaped unharmed from their aircraft after Monday's emergency touchdown.

The £15m aircraft's two main wheels failed to lower following a 90-minute practice run.

Firefighters extinguished a fire in a fuel tank on a right wing before it burst into a ball of flame.

The airmen, from the base's 12 Squadron, discovered they were in trouble as they approached the airstrip at 2,500ft when cockpit warning lights showed their two main wheels had not come down.

FO Gatland, 23, said: "We flew over the air traffic control tower and they confirmed the front wheel was down but the two main wheels were up and their carriage doors were closed."


I looked over to the right and saw flames erupting from the wing, which had made contact with the runway
FO Kev Gatland

After an emergency back-up system managed to lower the left wheel the duo decided to try to land.

The navigator added: "We mobilised the arresting hook which would hopefully catch a cable which is laid out on the runway to slow us down fast.

"We came in at about 165mph, landed on the left wheel, the front nose wheel came down and then the hook connected with the cable. We came to a halt five seconds - and 1,000ft - later.

"I looked over to the right and saw flames erupting from the wing, which had made contact with the runway.

"Thankfully the firefighters were on scene quickly to extinguish the fire."

Both men said they had considered evacuating the aircraft if the landing had gone wrong.

Flt Lt Walker added: "At the time we hoped the emergency back up system would help us out, but it didn't do us any good.

"I was so busy doing the checks and trying to sort things out and land safely that I didn't have time to worry."

Despite being shaken up by the episode the two men have already flown again.

An inquiry is to be carried out into the incident.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/4288383.stm

good drills guys. Apparently the emergency landing caused minimal damage to the aircraft, with only an empty fuel tank sustaing some bumps and scratches.

A_S
 
#2
And who says the RAF can't fly? I'm suprised at how apparantly modest the pilot's being, but at Flight Lieutenant maybe he hasn't been flying long enough to develop a planet sized ego yet!
 
#3
"We came in at about 165mph, landed on the left wheel, the front nose wheel came down and then the hook connected with the cable. We came to a halt five seconds - and 1,000ft - later.
165mph? FCUK!
 
#4
So I was bigging myself up to an Ex RN Harrier pilot.....

When I had told him about all the cool and dangerous things I'd done he gave me a wry smile and said:

"Yes, that reminds me of the time I ejected from my Harrier at 20 feet"

8O

I got my coat.
 
#5
LostBoss said:
So I was bigging myself up to an Ex RN Harrier pilot.....

When I had told him about all the cool and dangerous things I'd done he gave me a wry smile and said:

"Yes, that reminds me of the time I ejected from my Harrier at 20 feet"

8O

I got my coat.
Upside down? :D
 
#7
My father landed a jet in similar circumstances at Khormaksar, Aden in the 50s, having first disposed of his ordnance (he was on ops) over the sea. He recalls that after landing he returned to the Sqn building, to find the other pilots sitting outside holding up ice-skating stylee score cards. His log book records the incident with 'returned to aerodrome and landed safely.' This was the same man who wouldn't let me have a motorbike!

Good skills the Tornado boys.
 
#8
LostBoss said:
So I was bigging myself up to an Ex RN Harrier pilot.....

When I had told him about all the cool and dangerous things I'd done he gave me a wry smile and said:

"Yes, that reminds me of the time I ejected from my Harrier at 20 feet"

8O

I got my coat.
What he didn't tell you was he had to because he missed the runway and was about to hit the sea!

I won't deny that RN pilots are good BUT:

1) They all seem to think they're better than the RAF
2) They're insane for flying a single-engined plane with the aerodynamics of a breeze-block so if we have poo-fan interface it drops like a stone (this applies to RAF harrier pilots)
3) They're bitter as they never get to break the sound-barrier

RAF fast jet pilots may be arrogant tossers but they know they're stuff and are the best low flyers in the world.
 
#9
RAF fast jet pilots may be arrogant tossers but they know they're stuff and are the best low flyers in the world.

This may be true but put some weight on their backs and ask them for a game of tabbing they just don't want to know.

I sh*t em.
 
#10
LostBoss said:
RAF fast jet pilots may be arrogant tossers but they know they're stuff and are the best low flyers in the world.
This may be true but put some weight on their backs and ask them for a game of tabbing they just don't want to know.

I sh*t em.
True, but I'm sure they'd get a similar response from you if they offered to let you fly at 600 knots deep into enemy territory with everyone shooting anything they can at you, and if you did have to bang out you're almost certain to get killed by the enemy if you're lucky, captured and banged up and abused if you're not. I never said they could do anything else!
 
#11
ViroBono said:
My father landed a jet in similar circumstances at Khormaksar, Aden in the 50s, having first disposed of his ordnance (he was on ops) over the sea. He recalls that after landing he returned to the Sqn building, to find the other pilots sitting outside holding up ice-skating stylee score cards. His log book records the incident with 'returned to aerodrome and landed safely.' This was the same man who wouldn't let me have a motorbike!

Good skills the Tornado boys.
We were giving the Harrier bods scores on the doors at Larrbruch when we were doing reliability trials for Rapier FSC. Things were fine to start with but when the scores started dropping we were asked to 'cease and desist'. Very easily deflated egos! :lol:
 
#13
"The measure of a man is in his ability to carry heavy things a long way in the dark when it's raining. Preferably when these things are plastic and filled with concrete for "realism", all other attributes are secondary"

I forget who said this - probably the Duke of Wellington or perhaps Nelson Mandela.

I rest my case.
 
#14
LostBoss said:
"The measure of a man is in his ability to carry heavy things a long way in the dark when it's raining. Preferably when these things are plastic and filled with concrete for "realism", all other attributes are secondary"

I forget who said this - probably the Duke of Wellington or perhaps Nelson Mandela.

I rest my case.
It doesn't say what, exactly that measure is though, does it? To me that measure is having a few screws loose!

Apologies to any infanteers.
 
#15
I had an uncle bang out of a Lightning in foreign parts.

Not sure of the circumstances , and not sure I want to pry too deeply , as I was told a similar story by another Pilot, who said the reason bandied about that an ejection took place, was the student U/T (A Royal of some description) didn't like the acceleration and pulled the handle. The instructor to save his blushes , rotated and banged. Not sure if it's the same incident though.

Met a Harrier Jock at Gutersloh some years go who'd been on a lo-lo-lo in sunny Wales.

Came over a crest at 500+ knots and ran straight into a flock of birds. Time from ejection to smoking hole in ground was estimated by AIB at about 2 seconds 8O

No thankee very much, and good skills the Tonka crew.
 
#16
Baghdad-Brit said:
However good they MAY be in the air, they still have not shot a plane down for about 50 years (since Korea to be exact).
I think a 92 sqd Phantom pilot achieved this dubious honour in 1982(ish)

Unfortunately it was a 14 sqd Jaguar he downed :oops:
 
#18
as an air cadet was once warned not to salute pilots on Bicycles as "the silly sods insist on trying to return the salute lose control of bicycle and crash £2million quid pilot with a broken jaw laid up for 6 months (':oops:')"
 
#19
buggerit said:
LostBoss said:
RAF fast jet pilots may be arrogant tossers but they know they're stuff and are the best low flyers in the world.
This may be true but put some weight on their backs and ask them for a game of tabbing they just don't want to know.

I sh*t em.
True, but I'm sure they'd get a similar response from you if they offered to let you fly at 600 knots deep into enemy territory with everyone shooting anything they can at you, and if you did have to bang out you're almost certain to get killed by the enemy if you're lucky, captured and banged up and abused if you're not. I never said they could do anything else!
That sounds like me driving through Manchester. I would never bale out though under any circumstances, better to crash and burn.
 
#20
buggerit said:
RAF fast jet pilots may be arrogant tossers but they know they're stuff and are the best low flyers in the world.
Er no. I was watching some aircrew porn (French flying over the sea VVVVlow and VV fast) with some fast jet types. Their comments were F**k*ng Hell those boys are F**k**g Crazy. Being land I asked them why and they said that there is no way they would fly that fast that low.

Do they breathalyse after Air Traffic Accidents, or was it someone just pushed the wrong button. It'll end up the rear seaters fault couldn't tell off the superhuman ones.
 

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