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RAF mission to Munich comes up trumps after 70 years

#5
That's a bit like waiting for a RAF Helo to pick you up after a weeks patrol, you get the impression it'll eventually turn up but you haven't got a clue if it'll be during your lifetime.
 
#7
Apparently the German EOD people (they invariably use civvy firms) made a slight miscalculation. Also the use of straw to damp down the explosion was a master stroke of genius.
20 years ago when I lived in Goch (near Laarbruch) we were supposed to vacate our MQs as someone had found a bomb whilst carrying building works and extensions to the local GCP nick. The RAF drops a 1000lb bomb and 50 years later it hits the cop shop. Genius. Unfortunately it did not go off, but nice try anyway.
 
#9
Note to whoever does the EOD training courses these days:

Delete: Time delay fuze, example, 144 hours.

Insert: Time delay fuze, example, up to 70 years.
 
#10
Another example of "bomb disposal". About 2 years ago whilst carrying out road works a hole had to be made. Along comes man with JCB or whatever Herman uses and starts digging, and finds a bomb . Unfortunatley for him the bomb took umbrage at having its sleep disturbed. Well they wanted a hole dug. Job done.
 
#11
Questions are now being asked here about why massive piles of straw was used in an attempt to dampen the explosion, since straw has the inate ability to fly about in the air and catch fire the effect was that of a low performance "Fuel in Air" bomb adding much to the damage and to the spectacle. The crowd control was particularly Bavarian with residents asked to evacuate choosing to spectate on roof tops or in the street instead.

I suspect that there will be some jackboots, sorry, wellies in and out of intrays in the Ordnance disposal HQ in Hoxter this week.
 
#16
Now, I have very little knowledge of bomb disposal or clearing up things that might go bang, but the idea of using straw to "damp down an explosion" seems a little odd to me. Do these Germans know something we don't?
 
#19
Another example of "bomb disposal". About 2 years ago whilst carrying out road works a hole had to be made. Along comes man with JCB or whatever Herman uses and starts digging, and finds a bomb . Unfortunatley for him the bomb took umbrage at having its sleep disturbed. Well they wanted a hole dug. Job done.


:rofl:
 
#20
Now, I have very little knowledge of bomb disposal or clearing up things that might go bang, but the idea of using straw to "damp down an explosion" seems a little odd to me. Do these Germans know something we don't?

I can follow the logic to a point: Use a material with low mass (so no secondary fragmentation damage from it) to try to absorb blast and cut down the blast and fragmentation damage. However the use of straw for this is lunacy.

They would have been far better off using a water mattress. We smegged a 500 lb US Mk 82 very close to a large monastary and meditation centre in Thailand last year, without any damage to buildings, roof tiles, windows, solar panel arrays and the (above ground) water supply system.
 

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