Army Rumour Service

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

RAF- civvies no longer in uniform

That will never catch on in the Army, just because there is no reason to do something anymore doesnt mean tgat the Army is going to stop. You only have to read some of the replies on here to get feel of how some people are so brainwashed by the military that they never question why they do something poibtless, they just continue to do it.

But, but … TRADITION!

Oh, bugger. Bde of Guards, no less.

sjaq2yylnnr11.jpg


taprt3ktkb651.jpg
 

stacker1

On ROPS
On ROPs

stacker1

On ROPS
On ROPs
There were all sorts of noises made about 'Look at the SF in Afghanistan' and so on.

The thing being that at the point there becomes a CBRN threat, out comes the razor.
Does it? Shame no one has told the Sikhs.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
Fake news.

No one in the RAF works on a Friday.
 
Slight drift. Younger brother is a full screw, M.T. and has a 'full set'. When/why were rules changed?
Because they were increasing alienating people who might want to join/ rejoin and at odds with wider society?

We had a couple of (bearded) blokes who cited the requirement to shave as one of the reasons they wouldn't consider joining the TA, when they did the Regular Reserve Activation Exercise a couple of years ago.
 
Yeah I ask where the origins of British saluting came from on here once, no one seemed to know the answer (because Google couldnt tell them).
They must be fairly shite at google then. Here is a far fetched tale

" A 1745 British order book states: "The men are ordered not to pull off their hats when they pass an officer, or to speak to them, but only to clap up their hands to their hats and bow as they pass."

Yes that's more like it total subservience and bugger all about respecting the Queen's Commission.

 

stacker1

On ROPS
On ROPs
They must be fairly shite at google then. Here is a far fetched tale

" A 1745 British order book states: "The men are ordered not to pull off their hats when they pass an officer, or to speak to them, but only to clap up their hands to their hats and bow as they pass."

Yes that's more like it total subservience and bugger all about respecting the Queen's Commission.

They did google that. Plus the old no weapon in the hand.
But the Army doesnt bow so thats not it.
Also doesnt explain why they would pull off their hats.
Im also pretty sure that clapping your hands to your hat isnt the same as what we think of saluting today.
 
Dress guidance (pre lockdown) for main building now has increasingly relaxed. Service personnel on the single service staffs are encouraged to wear uniform on Wednesdays and on Fridays there's a distinctly dress down feeling. It seems that most people don't wear ties now but will have a tie and a coat available if they have to brief two star and above or cross the road to the FCO or COBR, where there is a distinct junior common room feeling about the place.
 
Last edited:
But the Army doesnt bow so thats not it.
Maybe they did in 1745
Also doesnt explain why they would pull off their hats.
It's a common greeting when wearing a hat, apart from for chavs that is, who also wear their hats indoors
m also pretty sure that clapping your hands to your hat isnt the same as what we think of saluting today.
Of course it isn't it was over 200 years ago and times change.

It was also recently common practice for civilians to raise their hand to their forehead when not wearing a hat to simulate a hat doff (tip). Though normally this was done by working men when meeting a 'superior'
 

stacker1

On ROPS
On ROPs
Maybe they did in 1745

It's a common greeting when wearing a hat, apart from for chavs that is, who also wear their hats indoors

Of course it isn't it was over 200 years ago and times change.

It was also recently common practice for civilians to raise their hand to their forehead when not wearing a hat to simulate a hat doff (tip). Though normally this was done by working men when meeting a 'superior'
Maybe they did in 1745, but no one really knows.

A common greeting for everyone you might have thought, not just officers.

The point being no one really knows what happened 200 years ago but it must be really really important.

Common practise for whom? I can find via google that some people might raise their hat if they felt like it, but it doesnt appear massively common.
 
As Solo Dave says, this was proposed by one of the NEDs on the Air Force Board; I think it was Sally Boyle of Goldman Sachs who noted that her firm has dress-down Fridays, so why doesn't the RAF. All I'm going to say is that it's a good job that Timo Anderson has retired and wasn't there to hear the suggestion...



Changed about a year ago, I think. The reasoning was to the effect that so long as the beard didn't have ringlets, or extend, ZZ Top-like, down to the waste, or have birds nesting in it, etc, etc, why not? There were, I gather, individuals who wanted to grow beards (ISTR the inevitable 'that includes some of the women!' observations on Pprune) and who thought that the restriction was a bit petty, not treating them like grown-ups, etc, etc. The AFB then asked the 'what's the reason for the regulation?' - doing so almost literally with the famous picture of George V, complete with full set and in full RAF uniform in the background - and concluded that while there might be operational reasons which would compel the removal of the beard, there didn't seem to be any justification in retaining the regulation (from the RFC), so allowed beards (ghostly cheers from ex-RNAS personnel).
Was it a going away present to RAF from Harry Duke of Woke (there are also pictures of Prince Michael of Kent in RAF uniform with a full set). In the old reactionary days the odd wide boy could get away with it on an MO's chit.
1597338261513.png
 
Maybe they did in 1745, but no one really knows.

A common greeting for everyone you might have thought, not just officers.

The point being no one really knows what happened 200 years ago but it must be really really important.

Common practise for whom? I can find via google that some people might raise their hat if they felt like it, but it doesnt appear massively common.
Up until the 1960s just about everybody wore a hat and there was a whole mass of rules and behavior around them.

Raising your hat was considered a polite greeting or a way of expressing approval or praise.

It still goes on in formal settings most commonly in equestrian settings or formal events such as Ascot or Henley.

Most common examples in the services are men removing headdress for church but service women keeping theirs on.

The modern expression Hats off to them directly refers back to raising a hat.

Totally agree with you that saluting is totally pointless and utterly barking and has no place in the 21st century
 
Up until the 1960s just about everybody wore a hat and there was a whole mass of rules and behavior around them.

Raising your hat was considered a polite greeting or a way of expressing approval or praise.

It still goes on in formal settings most commonly in equestrian settings or formal events such as Ascot or Henley.

Most common examples in the services are men removing headdress for church but service women keeping theirs on.

The modern expression Hats off to them directly refers back to raising a hat.

Totally agree with you that saluting is totally pointless and utterly barking and has no place in the 21st century




Totally agree with you that saluting is totally pointless and utterly barking and has no place in the 21st century. But what state military and many police and para military have abolished it? Red Army 1918 and Mao's CPLA did for a while then re-introduced, CPLA even abolished rank badges once.
 

Latest Threads

Top