RAF chief predicts controversial takeover of Royal Naval air

#1
The head of the RAF, Air Chief Marshal Sir Glenn Torpy, has sparked a major turf war within the armed forces after questioning the future of the Royal Navy's jet aircraft.
The Chief of the Air Staff told The Sunday Telegraph that rationalisation in the armed forces would lead to the RAF running all combat jet operations.

The move would effectively neuter the Royal Navy's maritime air force, the Fleet Air Arm, leaving the service with just a small complement of helicopters.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/new...ersial-takeover-of-Royal-Naval-air-power.html
 
#2
Realistically, why not?
The FAA is pretty much rotary experienced only now, with the early demise of Sea Harrier.
No carriers capable of true fixed wing operation,
Get it handed over to the RAF.
 
#4
He will cull the AAC next by the look of things, probably end up with recce helicopters only, may as well give them back to the RAC at that point.

When asked whether such a move would mean the end of the Fleet Air arm and the Army Air Corps, he said: "Well we'll wait and see what happens. We'll see further consolidation, it is an inevitability as we try and make ourselves as efficient as possible
 
#5
Interesting stuff. I suspect this is the RAF getting its retaliation in first as the services position themselves to fight the funding war, they've always been good at this sort of thing. It's only going to get worse. I wonder how much comes from reading the tea leaves and thinking that the carriers will never appear; if that happens then it becomes very difficult to argue for a fixed wing FAA. Of course expect the RN to come back and play the carrier card and the Army to play the "if it doesn't contribute to ops then why are we doing it, oh and we lost another soldier yesterday" card.

Trouble is, UK PLC never benefits from this sort of battle regardless of who wins.
 
#6
I think the current plan is for the RAF to get a Sqn of JSF, which will operate off the carriers, and for the Fleet Air Arm to also get a Sqn of JSF, again to operate off the carriers. This makes little sense to me, why have exactly the same capability in both organisations? As for who gets the capability, I am not sure it really matters and there are good arguments either way. And even if all JSF end up in the RAF there will still be a role for the Fleet Air Arm flying Merlin pingers and AEW Sea Kings. So make a decision and give JSF to one or other but not both.
 
#7
IMHO the best people to support the Army is an army based organisation. The best people to support the RN is similarly a naval organisation.
 
#8
Whet said:
IMHO the best people to support the Army is an army based organisation. The best people to support the RN is similarly a naval organisation.
So following that line the AAC should get fast jets?
 
#10
western said:
Whet said:
IMHO the best people to support the Army is an army based organisation. The best people to support the RN is similarly a naval organisation.
So following that line the AAC should get fast jets?
No, because CAP is only part of the job of fast air. There is however a case for the AAC to take over medium lift.
 
#11
Give all the RAF jets to the Royal Navy and enlarge AAC to take on all the rotary wing roles, RAF can keep heavy lift capability or contract that out to whomsoever can provide.
 
#12
I am assuming that due to his dress (desert flying suit) that the CAS had just returned from a mission in Afghan. Why do the crabs insist on wearing this kit when the only bomber they command is a mahogany one. It does give the rest of us something to laugh at I suppose.
 
#13
wooger said:
I am assuming that due to his dress (desert flying suit) that the CAS had just returned from a mission in Afghan. Why do the crabs insist on wearing this kit when the only bomber they command is a mahogany one. It does give the rest of us something to laugh at I suppose.
Take the toungue out of your cheek, they wear which ever one they feel like, on one of my Telics spoke to RAF moving type a during one of the many docs checks we went through before flying out he had several sets of deserts and hadn't been and said probably wouldn't go.
 
#14
Getting rid of the FAA wil ruin the armed forces. The Crabs do not intergrate well into the RN when they do operate from the carriers we have and the mank all the time. the accomadation is not good enough for them as they cannot have single man cabins and they bring too many people to do the same job as a naval Sqdn can do.
 
#15
Whet said:
western said:
Whet said:
IMHO the best people to support the Army is an army based organisation. The best people to support the RN is similarly a naval organisation.
So following that line the AAC should get fast jets?
No, because CAP is only part of the job of fast air. There is however a case for the AAC to take over medium lift.
Why not?

Give the AAC all the transport helis and Air to Mud assets. And the RAF Regt become Army.

The Navy take tankers, bombers, air transport and the Fighters.

Bada bing, bada bong, P45 time for alot of surplus personnel.
 
#16
The outgoing CAS should be careful what he wishes for. Sadly, this is the sort of inter-Service sniping that could result in some really swingeing rationalisation, e.g. the RAF being abolished (defended only by those deluded enough to believe it single-handedly prevented German invasion in 1940) and its assets divided between the Services that actually use them to, from and in theatre, i.e. the Army and the Royal Navy. Didn't he say "No sacred cows"?
 
#17
I do remember the chopper pilots who would come out in all weathers and conditions and lift us out of South Armagh no matter what, and it was NOT the RAF. RAF would give any excuse not to do a job, even quoting airframe hours once.

RN Helicopters were available to us 24 hours a day.
 
#18
The present situation where the defense budget always always seems to end up split equally three ways is really becoming a problem. This has little to do with actual requirements, but is a direct outcome of staff effort in the MoD, where frankly the RAF is over represented in relation to the military effect it generates...

My view is that the RAF should cease to be an independent service in its own right, and lose the seat on the defense council. The air function would then split into AD, CAS and transport. By all means extablish new Corps (Royal Air Defence Corps?) or departments within RN and the Army where these functions are not already catered for. The need for a separate air service went at the end of the cold war, there is now no longer a requirement for this service to operate independantly, which IMHO was the only reason to allow it to exist in the first place.
 
#19
"Sir Glenn, who retires at the end of July"

Enough said, the poison dwarf is just letting people know he is about to become available on the job market, self first.
 
#20
bobthedog said:
I do remember the chopper pilots who would come out in all weathers and conditions and lift us out of South Armagh no matter what, and it was NOT the RAF. RAF would give any excuse not to do a job, even quoting airframe hours once.

RN Helicopters were available to us 24 hours a day.
Maybe that's because their aircrews and CofC also serve in warships (frequently going on to command them) and can appreciate things from the other end of the winch wire.
 

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