Radiator Bleed screw rounded off

Hmm, does it come with pictures:-?
It sounds far too simple.
It really is as simple as it looks, you put plumbers tape on the threads, screw the valve tail into the radiator (replacing the existing tails), the radiator now has the turn screw isolator tails which connects to the normal radiator valve & TRV. The TRV & radiator valve isolate the water in the central heating system, the isolator valve tails isolate the water in the radiator. You can even drain the radiator to work on it, change bleed screws etc. then refill the radiator prior to connecting it to the system, virtually eliminating the need to bleed as there is little or no air in the system.
 
Don't be tight - just spend £3.19


Shut both valves at the bottom of the radiator - use spanner to remove/fit a new vent plug. Open the bleed screw - and slowly open the thermostatic valve until the air is purged, close bleed screw, then open both valves on the radiator again. Time required: 2 minutes. Difficulty level: Spastic
That’s the badgers! It’s just a shame you have to buy pairs with the next to useless blanking plug.
 

Camm1

LE
If you can get your hands on a small piece of inner tube from a bike tyre (or similar) cut it to about 10mm x 10mm, put it over the rounded off valve stem and then fit your brass radiator key over the top. It should generate enough grip to release the valve.

good luck.
Thanks for the tip it's worked a treat.

Any ideas on how to quickly splice an inner tube back together? She is on early shift tomorrow so swift response appreciated. Ta
 
It really is as simple as it looks, you put plumbers tape on the threads, screw the valve tail into the radiator (replacing the existing tails), the radiator now has the turn screw isolator tails which connects to the normal radiator valve & TRV. The TRV & radiator valve isolate the water in the central heating system, the isolator valve tails isolate the water in the radiator. You can even drain the radiator to work on it, change bleed screws etc. then refill the radiator prior to connecting it to the system, virtually eliminating the need to bleed as there is little or no air in the system.
Apart from the little task of having to extend the pipes which, with a timber floor, will involve lifting the floorboards and possibly running the pipe through another joist. You'll also have to put a short length of pipe between the isolating tail and the tee because the isolating tail has a compression fitting.

At least, that's what comes to mind looking at the picture and the reason why I'd fit a separate in-line isolating valve instead.

Isn't the isolating valve on the wrong side of the TRV/bottom valve to be much use? You'd have to fully drain the system if you needed to replace the valves.

Possible lightbulb moment - is this component intended to replace the (non-TRV) bottom valve? Still silly as you'd want it to transition from horizontal to vertical.
 
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Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Apart from the little task of having to extend the pipes which, with a timber floor, will involve lifting the floorboards and possibly running the pipe through another joist. You'll also have to put a short length of pipe between the isolating tail and the tee because the isolating tail has a compression fitting.

At least, that's what comes to mind looking at the picture and the reason why I'd fit a separate in-line isolating valve instead.

Isn't the isolating valve on the wrong side of the TRV/bottom valve to be much use? You'd have to fully drain the system if you needed to replace the valves.

Possible lightbulb moment - is this component intended to replace the (non-TRV) bottom valve? Still silly as you'd want it to transition from horizontal to vertical.
Oh Christ thats way out of my league. My plumbing skills go as far as bleeding radiators and running a bath.
 
Oh Christ thats way out of my league. My plumbing skills go as far as bleeding radiators and running a bath.
Well, I've replaced bleeding radiators, sodding sinks and flaming cisterns and found them easier than they would first appear. There's a lot of jobs that I wouldn't be confident touching though.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
I'm not exactly 'feeling the faith' here in @MrBane and his DIY skills. Concerning really seeing as he's booked to re-wire our house and put in a new fireplace.
Don't worry, he'll be round soon, he's just finished putting our new staircase in!
1572530126549.png
 
Apart from the little task of having to extend the pipes which, with a timber floor, will involve lifting the floorboards and possibly running the pipe through another joist. You'll also have to put a short length of pipe between the isolating tail and the tee because the isolating tail has a compression fitting.

At least, that's what comes to mind looking at the picture and the reason why I'd fit a separate in-line isolating valve instead.

Isn't the isolating valve on the wrong side of the TRV/bottom valve to be much use? You'd have to fully drain the system if you needed to replace the valves.

Possible lightbulb moment - is this component intended to replace the (non-TRV) bottom valve? Still silly as you'd want it to transition from horizontal to vertical.
These valves replace the existing tails, they are the same, I have no idea what you are thinking about, this is a simple mod to your existing radiator!
image.jpg

this is one of mine

and an unmodded valve
C168204E-86C6-456B-B9D6-782261E9A964.jpeg

Putting these valves in both ends allows you to isolate the water in the radiator, if you can’t see how this works, perhaps you should consult a plumber!
 
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These valves replace the existing tails, they are the same, I have no idea what you are thinking about, this is a simple mod to your existing radiator! View attachment 426817
this is one of mine

and an unmodded valveView attachment 426827
Putting these valves in both ends allows you to isolate the water in the radiator, if you can’t see how this works, perhaps you should consult a plumber!
It might isolate the water in the radiator but it doesn't isolate the water in the pipes. Closing the valve in the TRV has the same result as closing the isolating valve - in effect, the isolating valve is redundant. If you fit independent isolating valves in-line in the pipework, you can replace the TRV without having to drain the entire heating system - something you don't appear to be able to do with the configuration in the top photo.
 
Personally, I would weld up the aforementioned bleed thingy, in order that there is no possibility of future leaks, and insert a new bleed thingy in the face of aforementioned radiator to ensure ease of access. There is no charge for this advice.
 
It might isolate the water in the radiator but it doesn't isolate the water in the pipes. Closing the valve in the TRV has the same result as closing the isolating valve - in effect, the isolating valve is redundant. If you fit independent isolating valves in-line in the pipework, you can replace the TRV without having to drain the entire heating system - something you don't appear to be able to do with the configuration in the top photo.
I think you are not thinking about what you are saying, if you turn off the TRV & the radiator valve it isolates the radiator, and keeps the water in the pipes. You then isolate the tail valves and that keeps the water in the radiator, you then disconnect the radiator at the Crome nut on the tail. You can then remove the radiator from the wall, full of water, decorate behind the radiator or work on the radiator. Don’t tell me I’m wrong, I’ve got them fitted and they work!
Oh and btw, fitting in line isolator valves in the heating pipe work is not recommended as it causes a restriction in the line leading to all kinds of issues including worn central heating pumps, strain on pipe lines, excesses heat build up and blockages due to scale build up in the restriction, but hay, wtf do I know!
 
I think you are not thinking about what you are saying, if you turn off the TRV & the radiator valve it isolates the radiator, and keeps the water in the pipes. You then isolate the tail valves and that keeps the water in the radiator, you then disconnect the radiator at the Crome nut on the tail. You can then remove the radiator from the wall, full of water, decorate behind the radiator or work on the radiator. Don’t tell me I’m wrong, I’ve got them fitted and they work!
Oh and btw, fitting in line isolator valves in the heating pipe work is not recommended as it causes a restriction in the line leading to all kinds of issues including worn central heating pumps, strain on pipe lines, excesses heat build up and blockages due to scale build up in the restriction, but hay, wtf do I know!
You're correct in what you're saying, however these tail valves have a small ball valve that rotates inside a plastic/nylon case. I've know them to fail quite a bit and leak from the bit where you put the allen key once you turn it. It could be down to crap getting between the ball and the plastic or the fact that plastic fails when constantly heated and cooled down as microscopic cracks appear due to all that expansion and contraction. For the expense of these valves, and the fact the most people don't decorate that often. I'd say you may as well just drain the radiator down while removing it - that way you can empty all the iron oxide (black water), that comes out of the radiator when you remove it. Long term this causes less damage to your pump and seals in your boiler, as well as the heat exchanger (etc.) Of course, it's sensible to also have a magnetic filter fitted to your boiler pipework as well, to prevent/reduce this from happening - these are pretty cheap and most competent DIY'ers can fit them in a few minutes.
 
I think you are not thinking about what you are saying, if you turn off the TRV & the radiator valve it isolates the radiator, and keeps the water in the pipes. You then isolate the tail valves and that keeps the water in the radiator, you then disconnect the radiator at the Crome nut on the tail. You can then remove the radiator from the wall, full of water, decorate behind the radiator or work on the radiator. Don’t tell me I’m wrong, I’ve got them fitted and they work!
Oh and btw, fitting in line isolator valves in the heating pipe work is not recommended as it causes a restriction in the line leading to all kinds of issues including worn central heating pumps, strain on pipe lines, excesses heat build up and blockages due to scale build up in the restriction, but hay, wtf do I know!

You are Super Mario, and I claim my £5 (Not including VAT, or call out charge)
 
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Oh and btw, fitting in line isolator valves in the heating pipe work is not recommended as it causes a restriction in the line leading to all kinds of issues including worn central heating pumps, strain on pipe lines, excesses heat build up and blockages due to scale build up in the restriction, but hay, wtf do I know!
I was going to concede "fair point" until it occurred to me that the in-line isolating valve in your composite fitting does exactly the same and the valve/TRV will be a bigger restriction.
 
I think you are not thinking about what you are saying, if you turn off the TRV & the radiator valve it isolates the radiator, and keeps the water in the pipes. You then isolate the tail valves and that keeps the water in the radiator, you then disconnect the radiator at the Crome nut on the tail. You can then remove the radiator from the wall, full of water, decorate behind the radiator or work on the radiator.
I can do all of that along with the valve/TRV. (and its these that have rubber washers that perish and need to be maintained). You can't.
 

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