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Radial engines in tanks

The Wright Cyclone, was used in a number of Yank armoured vehicle’s M3 Stuart, M3 Lee/Grant, M4 Sherman and also the LTV Buffalo.
They were very popular with our lads in North Africa and the Far East, they had a big
‘eff off fan to cool them and would draw the air in through the vehicle.

Whirlwind, the Cyclone was a much bigger engine. The only tank application for it was the M6 Heavy. Now I think of it, I don't believe that the R670 (for the M3 Lights) ever got a nickname. There's also the Guiberson radial diesel that the US was mucking around with for a while until they decided to go all-petrol.

Except for the M10. Which has always thrown me, I'm trying to think what else was in the US Army Europe logistics system which was diesel.

As for the comet - perhaps a try by someone of an average height for the time given he cant get in

Probably a bit faster. However, my view is that it's all relative. If I can get out of a vehicle at a moderate speed, and another vehicle at good speed, I figure that a more WW2-sized person will get out of the first one quickly, and the second one very quickly. There are some exceptions. For example, opening the driver's hatch on T-34 will take time no matter what size you are, because of the need to unlock and lock it into place by use of a screw system.
 

idlerx

Swinger
An anecdote -
Back in the early 70's working in HMP, my boss JH had been a Sherman driver (two shot out) in France. Our wing Chief a Sherman commander of the same vintage asked him one day "Did you use to make tea in your tank?" To which JH replied "Of course, we had a Primus.........." IdlerX "What in the tank? That doesn't like a good idea to me." JH "Well........" Lovely old boys.
 
An anecdote -
Back in the early 70's working in HMP, my boss JH had been a Sherman driver (two shot out) in France. Our wing Chief a Sherman commander of the same vintage asked him one day "Did you use to make tea in your tank?" To which JH replied "Of course, we had a Primus.........." IdlerX "What in the tank? That doesn't like a good idea to me." JH "Well........" Lovely old boys.
.
Scintillating. Tanks for the memory.
 

Truxx

LE
Whirlwind, the Cyclone was a much bigger engine. The only tank application for it was the M6 Heavy. Now I think of it, I don't believe that the R670 (for the M3 Lights) ever got a nickname. There's also the Guiberson radial diesel that the US was mucking around with for a while until they decided to go all-petrol.

Except for the M10. Which has always thrown me, I'm trying to think what else was in the US Army Europe logistics system which was diesel.



Probably a bit faster. However, my view is that it's all relative. If I can get out of a vehicle at a moderate speed, and another vehicle at good speed, I figure that a more WW2-sized person will get out of the first one quickly, and the second one very quickly. There are some exceptions. For example, opening the driver's hatch on T-34 will take time no matter what size you are, because of the need to unlock and lock it into place by use of a screw system.
Diesels?

Diamond T 980/981 tank transporters and a selection of other stuff, notably certain Mack's.
 
Whirlwind, the Cyclone was a much bigger engine.
I always seem to get my Wright engines mixed up. Was the Whirlwind also used in the Buffalo?

A few years ago I got to drive an M4 for a DDay show at a place called Fritton Lake, it’s the place British Tankies were initially taught to swim DD Drive Valentines.
When I served I was a skinny bugger and wouldn’t have had any problems, but as 55 year old unfit bugger, I really struggled to get in or out.
As I often remarked to folk, all of the Tank crews had been brought up during the Great Depression. And consequently were all smaller and skinnier.
 

load_fin

War Hero
An anecdote -
Back in the early 70's working in HMP, my boss JH had been a Sherman driver (two shot out) in France. Our wing Chief a Sherman commander of the same vintage asked him one day "Did you use to make tea in your tank?" To which JH replied "Of course, we had a Primus.........." IdlerX "What in the tank? That doesn't like a good idea to me." JH "Well........" Lovely old boys.
That's the sort of excess baggage that lead to the "Tommy Cooker" reputation!
 
Undernourished boys were given extra rations to bring them up to normal entry standards, as far too many were failing the entry tests; too thin, too weak, eyesight and dental problems and so on.
 
Whirlwind, the Cyclone was a much bigger engine. The only tank application for it was the M6 Heavy. Now I think of it, I don't believe that the R670 (for the M3 Lights) ever got a nickname. There's also the Guiberson radial diesel that the US was mucking around with for a while until they decided to go all-petrol.

Except for the M10. Which has always thrown me, I'm trying to think what else was in the US Army Europe logistics system which was diesel.
Army and USN Seabee Caterpillar Crawler tractors D2-D8 were Diesel engined to some 56K of them

Oddly though they had Gasoline Pony Motors to start the diesels
 
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