r sigs... manned? jumping ship?

#1
have recently been back to the unique georgian town to find that a hefty percentage of folk in my peer group are signed off/signing off/seriously contemplating it.

one of the reasons that popped up the most was the fact they always said they would leave when they didnt enjoy it anymore.

whats the feeling in the corps then.

currently serving only. you old and bold wont like this anarchy and weakness of signing off etc
 
#2
H,
I can only speak for a few, when I say that the Corps' is going through a massive change at the mo, which can be and is very frustrating.

IIRC, there are only 3 of my phase 1 troop left in, not sure if this helps.
 
#3
the_lazy_H said:
have recently been back to the unique georgian town to find that a hefty percentage of folk in my peer group are signed off/signing off/seriously contemplating it.

one of the reasons that popped up the most was the fact they always said they would leave when they didnt enjoy it anymore.

whats the feeling in the corps then.

currently serving only. you old and bold wont like this anarchy and weakness of signing off etc
it aint weak, you have to have to have some big balls to get out now a days its a jungle out there???
 
#4
chedder04 said:
the_lazy_H said:
have recently been back to the unique georgian town to find that a hefty percentage of folk in my peer group are signed off/signing off/seriously contemplating it.

one of the reasons that popped up the most was the fact they always said they would leave when they didnt enjoy it anymore.

whats the feeling in the corps then.

currently serving only. you old and bold wont like this anarchy and weakness of signing off etc
it aint weak, you have to have to have some big balls to get out now a days its a jungle out there???
You have to have a stutter :?
 
#7
chedder04 said:
it aint weak, you have to have to have some big balls to get out now a days its a jungle out there???
Just wait until the recession bites. Things could get nasty! Survival of the fittest and all that....er no that's nothing to do with PFT timings. :)
 
#8
A lot of people at my unit have decide to transfer recently as well as the usual signing offs after a leave period.
 
#9
PoisonDwarf said:
chedder04 said:
it aint weak, you have to have to have some big balls to get out now a days its a jungle out there???
Just wait until the recession bites. Things could get nasty! Survival of the fittest and all that....er no that's nothing to do with PFT timings. :)
I bloody hope not or I'm fecked!
 
#10
monkeyspanker said:
I bloody hope not or I'm fecked!
You concentrate on getting a job mate. You need to be able to employ me when I leave - save me from living on a bit of cardboard under Waterloo Bridge.
 
#11
the more people signing off the better it is for me, less people on the promotion board.
 
#13
I am personally quite green and do love being in the corps, and see signing off as a sign of weakness. however recently noticed a complete lack of management skills from senior ranks and its pushed shop floor morale to an all time low. Just wish people would remember where they came from and that they dont have to s**t on those below them to gain promotion. Full screws at my unit are just highly paid siggys in the eyes of those above em !
 
#14
hey-up-cheeky said:
....recently noticed a complete lack of management skills from senior ranks and its pushed shop floor morale to an all time low.
Morale needs to come right from the top, as it is strategic issue for any organisation. A lack of morale tends to imply that people don't believe in their mission and what they're being expected to achieve, as well as not being rewarded for achievements and valued by the firm. So although your seniors may be at fault to some extent, it's wrong to simply pin the blame on middle management. Problems almost always trickle down from the big boss and his cronies - lack of direction, belief, confidence and all those other things that we talk about on CLM but too many people pay lip service to. I hope things improve.
 
#15
heidtheba said:
the_lazy_H said:
the more people signing off the better it is for me, less people on the promotion board.[/quote]

All depends on rank/trade though, doesn't it?
and if you are sh1t you still don't get above the promotibility line.
 
#16
Been in sunny blandford for a while now and have seen many of my original mates from basic transfer or get out myself one of them (transfering due to personal preference) alot of people dont like the change from basic to phase 2, some class themselves as *disillusioned* or generally cant hack the maths/course content so are going infantry... Personally i feel that they have all been struck by Blandford depression, the whole moral issue...

a few cpls etc that i know are also signing off or transfering and they say the same "its just that time" or "its time for something different".... the ones signing off seem to be less talkative than reallocants...
 
#17
Sappi said:
some class themselves as *disillusioned* or generally cant hack the maths/course content so are going infantry...
They'll be sorry in a few years when they get broken and can't get decent jobs on the outside.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
PoisonDwarf said:
Sappi said:
some class themselves as *disillusioned* or generally cant hack the maths/course content so are going infantry...
They'll be sorry in a few years when they get broken and can't get decent jobs on the outside.
Why do people habitually equate service in the infantry with a future of low-paid, mundane employment? Or for that matter, service in the Royal Signals as a guarantor of good post-service employment? These attitudes seem to stem from the National Service era when the Armed Forces was one of the few accessible places for a person to learn an employable trade.

I know of many men who only joined the Infantry with the express purpose of rolling around in the mud and shooting people for a few years and, having left, went on to go to university/learn a trade/forge a career. The Army, for all its beneficence, is not the be-all and end-all.

If the primary reason for joining the Army was to learn a transferable trade/skill for future civilian employment, they'd be a lot more cooks and clerks than signallers.
 
#19
RP578 said:
If the primary reason for joining the Army was to learn a transferable trade/skill for future civilian employment, they'd be a lot more cooks and clerks than signallers.
Pish tosh my good man! You clearly think that the Royal Signals only trains people to operate a radio. Our scope is huge these days and we have effectively cornered the G6 market - anything CIS is ours. In civilian terms, the Royal Signals controls the entire ICT sector, apart from a few wee specialist roles which other corps are fighting to retain. That's why it is such a good career and that's why it offers through-life personal development as much as, if not more than, other mobs.

Our AGC (SPS) clerks are glorified runners and the job market for people who can do the filing, act as a PA and file their nails was taken up by 19 year old girls years ago. You look at the job pages for clerical jobs and tell me how lucrative those skills are. They will get out and be earning £15k tops, barely enough to may a mortgage on a 2-bed house in Benbecula. It's a military trade where the entry criteria is a GCSE Grade G in both English and Maths - basically those with extremely poor literacy and numeracy. How else do you think they managed to replace their jobs with civvies so easily? Because the level of skills required is so low that even civil servants on £12k can do the job with no training and there has been a vast programme to recruit AGC (SPS) soldiers from commonwealth countries and it doesn't even matter if they can speak English effectively (okay, so Dundee can also be accused of that).

As for chefs' post-army employability, all they are is "reheating engineers". Anyone can do a fry up and anyone can knock up an omelette. OK so they can get a job as a dinner lady in school but again would they accept that pay? No way. The key is "cooks" not "chefs". Our RLC chefs are the Pay-as-you-Dine paramilitary wing, whose job it is to reheat food at minimum cost, a bit like a fast food restaurant. Again, just think about why the civil service has been able to kill off the trade so effectively, because our MoD doesn't want real chefs, it wants quantity rather than quality and so it has sold most of the jobs off to sodexho, avenance and so on. Guys who join to be chefs are not doing the job of a chef. I don't know many RLC chefs who want to stay in catering when they leave, because they are totally disillusioned at years of getting up at 0400 hrs to heat up sausages. The foul language may rival Gordon Ramsay's kitchen but the end product is completely different - food for the masses.

I also stand by my claim about the infantry. As soon as they get "broken" their Battalion doesn't want to know. They'll be forever one of the "sick lame and lazy" but stuck in the same battalion as their mates who are racing ahead. A few of my mates just left the Inf after 22 yrs, all reaching SNCO, and their jobs are lorry driver, school janitor and bus driver. They have to knock out loads of shiftwork and overtime to pay the mortgage. In contrast other guys I know from the Royal Signals who were JNCOs are clearing £5 grand a month on various Defence projects. Some are doing proper ICT stuff like network engineering and others are acting as project managers and so on. The ICT sector is massive (statement of the obvious there) and it will stay massive for at least the next decade. It's all to do with demand and supply and our lifestyles are becoming more and more dependent upon technology. Also if you're in the Royal Signals and you get broken (knackered back, knees etc) you can still do your job and still compete for promotion if you're good enough, as fitness, aggression and tactical ability aren't the sole criteria for success.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
PD,

I hear what you're saying and not for a minute am I belittling the opportunities offered by the Royal Corps of Signals. I also recognise the predicament of some of your former comrades in the Infantry after their long service, but don't think it's the typical experience of those that pass through the doors of an Infantry battalion. I would contend that most infantrymen are only in the Army for a few years and that their time in the colours serves as a life experience that opens their eyes to the big wide world out there and some cases, a fair bit of character development.

Why people become mentally blinkered about their post-service choices has always bothered me. Civilian life is need not be some sort of refracted mirror for military life where what you did in the Army has a direct correlation to what you'll do on the outside. I really do believe that the walls people build in their minds make them their own worst enemies.

Our AGC (SPS) clerks are glorified runners and the job market for people who can do the filing, act as a PA and file their nails was taken up by 19 year old girls years ago.
Yeah, OK. No argument there :D
 
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