Quite depressed.

Do you have a dog?
The outside of a dog is good for the inside of the mind.

My pup is ALWAYS there for me…just like all dogs.

Unless it‘s a Labrador and there’s food somewhere else.
 
Depressed is normal, it's how you tell the dreadful times that is every day life from the wonderful moments. You need to get yourself a wonderful moment in your head.
 
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As I walked the dog tonight there were two young lads play sword fighting with long sticks on the footpath with two lasses photographing them on their phones. As I approached they stopped stood to one side and saluted as I passed. One of the lasses said they were only young and I said I know I used to be that age once, and I heard one of the lads say he knows what's it about. Little thing but it put a spring in my step for the rest of the walk
 
I’m trying something different and speaking to a life coach on Thursday.

I’ll post on this thread how it goes. It may be useful to someone.
 
I was gardening before, but this year was a write-off and now there's just an overgrown mess that needs to be cleared. Last time I started on it I got another bout of lumbago.

I do see the benefit of being more active but it seems that I've become so physically deconditioned that my attempts to just carry on as I was 2 years ago always end in some kind of injury. Something like swimming would probably be the best way to re-start but involves finding the time and facility to do it.

Can I suggest Tai Chi. Gentle exercises that have proven to be very powerful because you're meant to be totally present in your body when doing the routine. It is also described as a form of walking meditation. The theory is its effectiveness is due to the person working on their energetic body and unblocking any energy.

It looks very funny but don't be fooled, it is a form of martial arts. This is Chen Man Ching doing push hands and it's amazing how he's throwing the guy off balance, almost lifting him off the ground. The point is to feel the other person's centre of gravity at the same time hiding your move when you push.

Anyhow, I hope it's not too woo. :) Because of my depression I've looked in many directions and tried different things and I found this very helpful.

 

964ST

LE
Can I suggest Tai Chi. Gentle exercises that have proven to be very powerful because you're meant to be totally present in your body when doing the routine. It is also described as a form of walking meditation. The theory is its effectiveness is due to the person working on their energetic body and unblocking any energy.

It looks very funny but don't be fooled, it is a form of martial arts. This is Chen Man Ching doing push hands and it's amazing how he's throwing the guy off balance, almost lifting him off the ground. The point is to feel the other person's centre of gravity at the same time hiding your move when you push.

Anyhow, I hope it's not too woo. :) Because of my depression I've looked in many directions and tried different things and I found this very helpful.

Would be handy to get peeps to social distance!
 
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walrusboy

War Hero
That is quite literally the last thing I want to do. Drugging myself even more isn't solving my problems and isn't a long term solution.

I have concerns about talking to my GP because of the record it leaves which can make applying for DV or similar work awkward.
Many people with DV have MH problems and successfully hold down security cleared employment. The important factor is that you have acted appropriately in seeking treatment to control your condition. Concealing a MH problem and not obtaining treatment would be viewed far more seriously. You should not feel that an open and honest MH disclosure in a DV interview would be viewed adversely. It won't.
 

GDog

Old-Salt
How about a bike ride? It's low impact and if you're careful about not putting too much stress on your back (don't lean over and put too much weight on the handlebars) it can be a nice way to pootle around and get some fresh air.

(also, sorry to have to ask, what is DV?)
DV is Developed Vetting. It's a security clearance granted for Government jobs working with secret information - that involves a quite intrusive assessment to assure the employer you are not vulnerable to blackmail etc.
 

GDog

Old-Salt
Do you have a dog?
The outside of a dog is good for the inside of the mind.

My pup is ALWAYS there for me…just like all dogs.
No. I don't have the space and if we ever go back to normal work routines it wouldn't be looked after properly. Plus my cat would hate it.

I grew up with dogs and this time last year was half-looking after my parent's dog when my dad was in hospital. Walking him was a welcome escape.

Unfortunately said dog has turned into something my mother spitefully obsesses over in every interaction (she couldn't look after it, my sister now owns him but it's effectively been framed in her mind as a theft).
 

bentobox

Old-Salt
DV is Developed Vetting. It's a security clearance granted for Government jobs working with secret information - that involves a quite intrusive assessment to assure the employer you are not vulnerable to blackmail etc.
Thanks GDog, very interesting
 

RTU'd

LE
Depression is a real killer among young men & military veterans.

Really upsets me that people are still finding it the only option.
Scandalous is these time that it is happening to veterans still.

Mental Health services have been raped by every government since the mid 1990's

For the young it seems to be a badge of honour to be sectioned under the mental health act.
A way of bigging it up to mates and fellow low life dole spongers down the pub.

To others it destroys careers, relationships & Lives.

Sorry for being morbid over this.
 
Depression is a real killer among young men & military veterans.

Really upsets me that people are still finding it the only option.
Scandalous is these time that it is happening to veterans still.

Mental Health services have been raped by every government since the mid 1990's

For the young it seems to be a badge of honour to be sectioned under the mental health act.
A way of bigging it up to mates and fellow low life dole spongers down the pub.

To others it destroys careers, relationships & Lives.

Sorry for being morbid over this.
You're right.
It's great having poster campaigns saying 'It's OK to not be OK', but there needs to be some substance behind it. What follows when someone says 'I'm not OK'
 
On Tuesday, a close friend in the US died of an opiate overdose/accident. He was 29. Visiting him was near the top of my list on "stuff to do when Covid blows over".

I've had better weeks.
I'm sorry to hear that. Things like that are always a kick in the guts.
Did you explore any help for your depression?
 
The problem is talking and having someone to 'casually' talk over these things with face to face so you can get it right in your mind and work through the stages of dealing with it is no longer as easy a thing to acquire as it was before social media took over.

GDog is talking - to us and others . You get it, GD. And others will benefit from this.

The false, immediate intimacy of social media looks like it would work, but unlike slower, less flashy anonymous fora it is all flushable input. Boring old fora record the conversations so you can refer back or be offered insights from a new angle by latecomers. To speak comfortably because although people may not be known personally to you, teh anonymity removes risks (in sensible hands, admittedly, but at least you can research which posters are twits and ignoe 'em).
 

RTU'd

LE
You're right.
It's great having poster campaigns saying 'It's OK to not be OK', but there needs to be some substance behind it. What follows when someone says 'I'm not OK'
Oh yes.
Like the government giving GP's £250 Million this winter.
BUT see the paperwork & red tape you have to go through to get the money.
Hence most GP surgeries not bothering with the money & the BMA are balloting Doctors on strike action.
 

GDog

Old-Salt
I'm sorry to hear that. Things like that are always a kick in the guts.
Did you explore any help for your depression?
I'm waiting for a moment when I might have some privacy to make a call. My boyfriend's office closed for Covid which means I very rarely get the house to myself. There are obviously some moments but it's hard to book an appointment in advance for moments that happen fairly spontaneously.
 

GDog

Old-Salt
Depression is a real killer among young men & military veterans.

Really upsets me that people are still finding it the only option.
Scandalous is these time that it is happening to veterans still.

Mental Health services have been raped by every government since the mid 1990's

For the young it seems to be a badge of honour to be sectioned under the mental health act.
A way of bigging it up to mates and fellow low life dole spongers down the pub.

To others it destroys careers, relationships & Lives.

Sorry for being morbid over this.
I did school work experience in a mental hospital in the 90s (fire safety) and recall nurses not being keen on "care in the community" back then. The travel writer Bill Bryson wrote of the mental health work he saw in the 70s where people were kept in institutions and he felt they were better cared for within them then, feeling despondent that most of it was closed to save money in later years.

I've seen others describe the asylums as hellish and abusive places. Maybe closing them was the right thing to do. To be totally honest I don't have enough experience to decide which was better. This may have been a judgement call rather than someone 'raping' the system, although I will accept that community care was almost certainly seen as being cheaper.

I honestly don't think getting sectioned is in any way a badge of honour. It happened to a cousin when I was younger and nobody thought it was fun. A lot of effort was expended by his parents, arguing that the prescribed drug side effects were worse than the original problem. Having visited him at the time, they had a point. There wasn't much confidence in the doctors and he had parents that advocated for him aggressively, which benefited him enormously. My friend who died this week was at one point sectioned in the US and he said it was a harrowing, prison like experience. It was not something he bragged about.

That said, I now have a relative who works as a housing officer with some fairly unstable people and she has had situations where people really did need to be protected from themselves, but the threshold for being sectioned was so high that they ended up eventually coming to harm.

It grates. So many crap, harmful decisions being made - from the level of the PM, all the way down to individual staff at the bottom of the Government hierarchy.

And we all pay for it.
 
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