Quite depressed.

GDog

Old-Salt
The last two years have not been fun. To be brief, problems involve: terminating a career change plan, death of a parent, a surviving parent who is narcissistic, stress from said parent's business having no succession plan and my over-use of alcohol - then all of the above but with Covid imposed on top.

Support is offered through so many channels I have no idea which is relevent or appropriate (NHS services through GP, work health insurance mental health hotlines, work EAP schemes, hospital grief counselors, veteran schemes and possibly some more I forgot at time of posting).

I have no idea which of the above would be worth talking to or what they can offer, nor if it's worth talking to them at all. What happens if you phone them? Is one service better than another?

Are they actually helpful or is this something I simply have to work out for myself?
 

GDog

Old-Salt
Maybe talk to GP first? If you aren’t on antidepressants maybe that’s worth a go.
That is quite literally the last thing I want to do. Drugging myself even more isn't solving my problems and isn't a long term solution.

I have concerns about talking to my GP because of the record it leaves which can make applying for DV or similar work awkward.
 

Boris_Johnson

ADC
Moderator
DirtyBAT
@GDog as Jarrod says, book in with your GP.

They offer the Wellbeing service which can take you down many different angles.

I've been down the peer counselling route in the past - you also have mood trackers etc where you score yourself on how you're feeling along the way in between the phone calls. I was pleasantly surprised by the results and feedback.

You've paid into the pot - don't be afraid to use it...!

PS - I've moved this to a more appropriate forum. Have a look at some of the other threads posted within it - some of it may be of use? Good luck.
 
If you are a ex. service then your old unit may be able to help
 

exspy

LE
That is quite literally the last thing I want to do. Drugging myself even more isn't solving my problems and isn't a long term solution.

I have concerns about talking to my GP because of the record it leaves which can make applying for DV or similar work awkward.

You won't be drugging yourself. Medication taken under a doctor's care can be very beneficial. I agree about starting with your GP first. He/she will be able to provide you advice on your next step. It's what I did.
 
I'm not in position to say about clearence anymore, but don't talk yourself out of medication. Once the correct meds (for you) are found, you may feel less awful. Drugged zombie is a thing of the past.
 

bentobox

Old-Salt
Good for you for coming here, opening up and asking for help. Some good suggestions here, please do take action, best wishes for your future, Take care.
 
The last two years have not been fun. To be brief, problems involve: terminating a career change plan, death of a parent, a surviving parent who is narcissistic, stress from said parent's business having no succession plan and my over-use of alcohol - then all of the above but with Covid imposed on top.

Support is offered through so many channels I have no idea which is relevent or appropriate (NHS services through GP, work health insurance mental health hotlines, work EAP schemes, hospital grief counselors, veteran schemes and possibly some more I forgot at time of posting).

I have no idea which of the above would be worth talking to or what they can offer, nor if it's worth talking to them at all. What happens if you phone them? Is one service better than another?

Are they actually helpful or is this something I simply have to work out for myself?

Never think you have to work it out for yourself. We all need help at times.

How good is one service over another? I think that’s more a personal thing, but you’ll only ever know if you try.

If you are a veteran try



 

GDog

Old-Salt
I am *very* reluctant to do anything via my GP. Not because I don't trust them, but because it will sit on my medical record and affect my future employment opportunities.

Although I technically qualify as a vet, I served less than a year and bluntly don't want to draw on services designed for people who might have greater need and fewer alternatives that are open to myself.
 
I have concerns about talking to my GP because of the record it leaves which can make applying for DV or similar work awkward.
The only impact on DV work would be not admitting to MH issues
Very few people get through life without facing some mental health issues.
The DV authorities are well aware of that. What will screw up your DV chances are hiding issues you are aware of but hid.
More importantly, your mental health is more important than than some potential job in the future.
 
Well done asking for help and realising that your having issues. That is the most important thing!

Look for help where ever it is on offer from genuine organisations.

My 2 cents of advice (as someone who has watched an alcoholic destroy their life and family) - knock the drink on the head first. It won’t solve all the problems but it is a depressant and will only make matters harder to cope with.
 
The last two years have not been fun. To be brief, problems involve: terminating a career change plan, death of a parent, a surviving parent who is narcissistic, stress from said parent's business having no succession plan and my over-use of alcohol - then all of the above but with Covid imposed on top.

Support is offered through so many channels I have no idea which is relevent or appropriate (NHS services through GP, work health insurance mental health hotlines, work EAP schemes, hospital grief counselors, veteran schemes and possibly some more I forgot at time of posting).

I have no idea which of the above would be worth talking to or what they can offer, nor if it's worth talking to them at all. What happens if you phone them? Is one service better than another?

Are they actually helpful or is this something I simply have to work out for myself?
Both.

You have a lot more power over your own life and circumstances than you realise. You can set small daily goals to improve your life, while looking around for the right professional help.

Try easing back on the booze and taking daily exercise. That's something you may be able to start at once. You'll feel physically better and a lot more in control.

The fact that you've posted here shows that you're already moving towards fixing things. Take a few more positive steps tomorrow. It does get better and it will get easier!
 
Nope, you qualify. It’s as simple of that.

I’m pretty fücked. It’s not a competition. I don’t think for one moment that anyone who genuinely needs help is less deserving or is taking anything from me.

I want to see you fit and well so that you can pay more taxes and support my fat arse :-D
 
Drugging myself even more isn't solving my problems and isn't a long term solution.

That is true but the right medication can calm the emotions and stop the thoughts constantly whizzing around in your head. You need to be able to think and from what you've posted you've got difficulty making any decisions. You can come off the medication once things have settled.

Medication has been very helpful for me.
 
D

Deleted 100463

Guest
The last two years have not been fun. To be brief, problems involve: terminating a career change plan, death of a parent, a surviving parent who is narcissistic, stress from said parent's business having no succession plan and my over-use of alcohol - then all of the above but with Covid imposed on top.

Support is offered through so many channels I have no idea which is relevent or appropriate (NHS services through GP, work health insurance mental health hotlines, work EAP schemes, hospital grief counselors, veteran schemes and possibly some more I forgot at time of posting).

I have no idea which of the above would be worth talking to or what they can offer, nor if it's worth talking to them at all. What happens if you phone them? Is one service better than another?

Are they actually helpful or is this something I simply have to work out for myself?
Sorry to see that you feel this way. I can't provide anything helpful medically, but after recent events here all I can say is keep plugging away, you aren't alone
 

DSJ

LE


This is a free service to veterans and largely staffed by veterans. If a bit of coaching can help to clear the thinking then that might be a good start? Best of luck.
 

GDog

Old-Salt
You won't be drugging yourself. Medication taken under a doctor's care can be very beneficial. I agree about starting with your GP first. He/she will be able to provide you advice on your next step. It's what I did.
Bluntly, I believe that things are going badly due to circumstances rather than brain chemistry. It is likely to be healthier to fix the former than meddle with the latter.

Alcohol is complicating this ideal, but at the moment is something I'd want to deal with later.
 
The telephone services won't be tracking you.the White Wall (? can't remember exactly) said so & you can go in & out as you wish. Try it & see?
If it doesn't sit right, don't go back.
A mental health episode will affect you if you decide to join the police (special const, anyway), but it's not a life sentence.

Maybe life has just got on top of you and 'talking therapy' 'brain painkillers' (antidepressants/ valium/whatever) can be a break n& a reset. Even just writing your post is a start on a new road.

For what it's worth, I was under treatment 10 years ago and have been vetted (NB: not neutered!)n since. All good.
 

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