Quick question about chances of getting in

#1
I'm asking for a friend as I am extremely far from being officer material. Anyway, he has the A levels, and GCSES, and is currently studying for an electrical systems engineering degree. He wants to apply to become an officer in the Army Air Corps but is worried about it being an almost impossible job to get. I told him to go for it if its what he wants, but his dad was a Colour Sergeant in the Army, and has told him not to bother because hardly anybody that applies gets the job.

Thanks for reading, hope I get some encouraging comments for him!
 
#2
gsxrcbr said:
I'm asking for a friend as I am extremely far from being officer material. Anyway, he has the A levels, and GCSES, and is currently studying for an electrical systems engineering degree. He wants to apply to become an officer in the Army Air Corps but is worried about it being an almost impossible job to get. I told him to go for it and try his hardest, but his dad was a Colour Sergeant in the Army, and has told him not to bother because hardly anybody that applies gets the job.

Thanks for reading, hope I get some encouraging comments for him!
I also have a friend who was with this girl, and......... but, hey, that's best saved for another time!

Tell your friend to peruse the Army website, search this website for all that is relevant (and much that isn't), visit the ACIO and grab any freebies, and then follow the instructions on the tin.

But if he asks someone else to do that which he really should be doing himself, he ain't no officer material. QED.

Litotes
 
#3
But if he asks someone else to do that which he really should be doing himself, he ain't no officer material. QED.

Litotes
But surely that is what they all do anyway, get the blokes to do all the leg work than lay back and revel in the glory, or is it called delegation???


Sparky
 
#4
If he doesn't try he will never know. Your friend should also make sure that he looks other corps as each has its own personality as my brother send to me before I joined up the a lot of work done by an officer is universal to the entire army it all about which were you feel you fit into best.
 
#5
sparkysapper said:
But if he asks someone else to do that which he really should be doing himself, he ain't no officer material. QED.

Litotes
But surely that is what they all do anyway, get the blokes to do all the leg work than lay back and revel in the glory, or is it called delegation???


Sparky
If that was all that was required, Sparky, none of the b******* would turn up for Sandhurst, other than out of a sense of curiosity!

Litotes
 
#6
Thanks for the advice, I'm only asking for him because he doesn't have the internet. He's got an appoint next week to speak to them. Does anybody know the percentage roughly of people that get to become officers?
 
#7
Litotes said:
sparkysapper said:
But if he asks someone else to do that which he really should be doing himself, he ain't no officer material. QED.

Litotes
But surely that is what they all do anyway, get the blokes to do all the leg work than lay back and revel in the glory, or is it called delegation???


Sparky
If that was all that was required, Sparky, none of the b******* would turn up for Sandhurst, other than out of a sense of curiosity!

Litotes

PMSL Litotes,

fair one, it is a good job though that they aren't given a map to find their way or half of them would still be lost.

Sparky
 
#8
gsxrcbr said:
Thanks for the advice, I'm only asking for him because he doesn't have the internet. He's got an appoint next week to speak to them. Does anybody know the percentage roughly of people that get to become officers?
Depends on your definition of the start state and the end state! I believe that for the whole Army the figure between enquiries and arriving at the Depot is 1 in 20. That is, 20 enquiries lead to one soldier arriving at the gate (sic).

Litotes
 
#9
Litotes said:
That is, 20 enquiries lead to one soldier arriving at the gate (sic).

Litotes
Alternatively, and thanks to Sparky:

That is, 20 enquiries lead to one officer arriving at the gate - eventually and with his map upside down!

Litotes
 
#12
Worth adding that the proportion of those who finish RMAS Commissioning Course to those who start it is is over 80%.

However, the AAC is one of the most over-subscribed Corps with some rather esoteric entry requirements involving a "flight aptitude test". Even those who make it in often don't stay long. The one chap I commissioned with who joined AAC is now in the AGC(ETS).

If your friends principle ambition it to fly, then he'd be better of with the crabs. But if he mainly wants to be an Army officer, then by all means apply for AAC sponsorship (at the very least it'll mean some great familiarization visits) but be aware that there are many other worthy Corps and Regiments that might offer him more than he expects.

IF
 
#14
gsxrcbr, hello again on another aviation related thread.

If he wants to be an army air corps officer then their best chance is to be sponsored AAC from the beginning and maintain interest all the way through and just do well at Sandbags. Otherwise you have to be really quite special for them to look at you half way through. This is simply down to the number of cadets who put the corps down as second choice. 76 applied when I went through and only 6 of us got accepted. That sounds worse than it is, around 22 of those were first choice AAC.

That said it may have now changed as the requirements for aircrew are 'adapting' to the Apache program. They're looking to roughly halve the number of Lynx pilots that they currently have, for example.

To get round to actually answering your question, your pal has nothing to lose by going AAC as first choice as if he is any good another unit will accept him without a qualm should he fail grading or aptitude (both of which are normally done pre Sandhurst anyway).

Of course if he fails the pilots course (failure rate roughly 1 in 6) a year or so in it may be another matter, but being career fouled is part and parcel of being an AAC officer!

Don't advise him to join the crabs unless you think he's a dull social reject with no taste in suits!

Hope that helps, and in answer to your other query, you again have nothing to lose, and no, you won't spend as much time in the field but do expect some. We are all still soldiers despite the opinions of some.
 
#15
Litotes said:
gsxrcbr said:
Thanks for the advice, I'm only asking for him because he doesn't have the internet. He's got an appoint next week to speak to them. Does anybody know the percentage roughly of people that get to become officers?
Depends on your definition of the start state and the end state! I believe that for the whole Army the figure between enquiries and arriving at the Depot is 1 in 20. That is, 20 enquiries lead to one soldier arriving at the gate (sic).

Litotes
I was told in my little briefing last week that roughtly only 3 or 4 applications are filled for every 20 enquiries, so if one in 20 turns up at the gate is that an rejection rate of 60-75 % at the RCB?
 
#16
Junglynx said:
gsxrcbr, hello again on another aviation related thread.

If he wants to be an army air corps officer then their best chance is to be sponsored AAC from the beginning and maintain interest all the way through and just do well at Sandbags. Otherwise you have to be really quite special for them to look at you half way through. This is simply down to the number of cadets who put the corps down as second choice. 76 applied when I went through and only 6 of us got accepted. That sounds worse than it is, around 22 of those were first choice AAC.

That said it may have now changed as the requirements for aircrew are 'adapting' to the Apache program. They're looking to roughly halve the number of Lynx pilots that they currently have, for example.

To get round to actually answering your question, your pal has nothing to lose by going AAC as first choice as if he is any good another unit will accept him without a qualm should he fail grading or aptitude (both of which are normally done pre Sandhurst anyway).

Of course if he fails the pilots course (failure rate roughly 1 in 6) a year or so in it may be another matter, but being career fouled is part and parcel of being an AAC officer!

Don't advise him to join the crabs unless you think he's a dull social reject with no taste in suits!

Hope that helps, and in answer to your other query, you again have nothing to lose, and no, you won't spend as much time in the field but do expect some. We are all still soldiers despite the opinions of some.
A fair and well-presented point! But, in all seriousness, it may be worth considering a twin-track approach if his main effort is just to fly and wear a grow-bag covered in badges; i.e., apply to the AAC and the RAF at the same time. I'm not sure how that would go down with RCB, but OASC (RAF Officers and Aircrew Selection Centre, who would also administer the aircrew aptitude tests on behalf of AAC) wouldn't view it in a particularly dull light. You could even spin it as a sign of dedication to a career as a military aviator.

Something to bear in mind, though; someone on a broadly related thread stated (quite rightly) that the Army equips men, and the RAF mans equipment. I'd go so far as to say that Sandhurst and Lympstone produces junior officers, while Cranwell produces aircrew plus ancilliary support.
 
#17
There is an element of selection involved with any job, for every educationally disadvantaged burger flipper at Maccy Dees, there must be a dozen who get turned away.
Never lets the apparently poor odds dissuade you from your chosen path in life. It is far better to have tried, and perhaps failed, than to spend your life wondering "what if?"
 
#18
Thanks spotrep, I thought it was even handed and balanced as I dictated it to my batman! (Ah, that'll be my box...)

The AAC won't be over impressed by a dual application to the RAF due to the 'soldiers first' attitude. The question they almost always ask at interviews is, "Are you joining to fly or to lead?". Needless to say the RAF application will lead them to thinking of the former, which is not what they're after.

Just lie like we all did and say, "to lead men of course sir!" in your brightest and most cheerfully enthusiastic voice, and after about three years of training, you may actually see an Airtrooper as he marshals you out of dispersal!
 
#19
Gilgamesh said:
Litotes said:
Depends on your definition of the start state and the end state! I believe that for the whole Army the figure between enquiries and arriving at the Depot is 1 in 20. That is, 20 enquiries lead to one soldier arriving at the gate (sic).

Litotes
I was told in my little briefing last week that roughtly only 3 or 4 applications are filled for every 20 enquiries, so if one in 20 turns up at the gate is that an rejection rate of 60-75 % at the RCB?
Gilgamesh,

1. I used the words "whole Army" and "believe" in my response. Figures like these change on a daily basis and depend on who and what you ask.
2. I do not know what the success rate for RCB is (although I would be surprised if it was outside the 70-80% figure) but if you search this site, you might find other opinions. Those people arriving at RCB have already been filtered and the no-chancers eliminated. Beyond RCB, there are more hurdles and some people will fall at those.
3. There was a recent television programme for potential popstars. I believe that the final programme was a competition between 4 or 5 artistes. Does that mean the chances of winning were 1 in 5? No, it doesn't. The overall chance of winning was more like 1 in 10,000.

Litotes
 
#20
The pass rate for RCB was 69% in 2003. Passing this pretty much allows you to turn up at Sandhurst at your convenience. You don’t officially compete with your peers over your capbadge preference until you’re on the course.

Gsxrcbr, I think your friend needs to decide, before he meets the recruiting officers, whether he has enthusiasm to join another capbadge if he is not successful in his first choice. The Army might not accept him if it sounds like he might leave Sandhurst if he didn’t get into the AAC.

A low chance of success is no reason not to try (!) but a very good reason for him to also look at other careers i.e RAF, civilian pilot. The RAF officer application process is very different: He would apply to one or more specific branches, and if he isn’t offered Pilot/ Navigator/ Sergeant Aircrew etc before joining he just walks away without having wasting their training or accepting a job he didn’t want.
 

Latest Threads

New Posts