Questions to Test Knowledge of British Military Terminology

#1
Morning lads and lasses,

A friend of mine is in the process of writing up a job spec that requires familiarity with UK military terminology, including ranks, structure, customs and traditions.

She has asked for some help to come up with questions to test this knowledge during the interview stage.

Can anyone come up with some sample questions with a wide range of difficulties that I can pass back?

Given that this is a serious question in a serious forum, skiffing etc does not need to be included!

Thanks fellas
 
#2
Easy.

Rank progression: Major is senior to Lieutenant - so why is a Lt Gen senior to a Maj Gen?
 
#3
Sounds suspicious...

Make sure she is fully 'Wah'd Up'..... would hate to see her getting caught out by the former Bill Oddie being interviewed... 8O
 
#4
FourZeroCharlie said:
Easy.

Rank progression: Major is senior to Lieutenant - so why is a Lt Gen senior to a Maj Gen?
Actually I don't know the answer to that!
 
#5
Blimey, even an old bloke like me, knows that.

It used to be Sgt. Major General....then Lt General.

Well that is what Cpl Clothier told me in 1956....he was my Troop Cpl,

he was like God.

I am so far away from it, yet it interests me still.

Good luck CarpeDiem.
 
#6
basso said:
Blimey, even an old bloke like me, knows that.

It used to be Sgt. Major General....then Lt General.

Well that is what Cpl Clothier told me in 1956....he was my Troop Cpl,

he was like God.

I am so far away from it, yet it interests me still.

Good luck CarpeDiem.
Basso, that was the explanation I was given too.
 
#8
BlueSkinnedBeast, spot on.

Lt Gen is senior to Major General. However, first time that I have heard

your reasoning.

I look forward to reading a definitive answer from one or two of the

officers who frequent these hereabouts. :)
 
#9
Heres a good one.

Name all the various names for of the rank of Private.

Points for how many they get.
 
#10
I am curious as to what the actual job is. There is little use setting a General Knowledge quiz (pun intended)unless it tests skills or aptitudes relevant to the post in question. Instead, give them real-life examples of situations which may arise.

I am doubtful that an in-depth knowledge of the rank structure of the Armed Forces could be considered to be an essential skill for any civvy job, as it would be so easy for an employer to provide this information in easy-reference format.

Here's some questions anyway:

Put the following in order of seniority:
Captain RA
Captain RDG
Captain RM
Captain RN
Group Captain RAF


Where does the term 'Crab' come from?
 
#12
Common acronyms and jargon; bergen, OP, RV, DTG, NAAFI, stag, basha, nig, recce, CS95 etc

NATO alphabet, 24hr time

Location questions: Where is BATUS? What is SENTA? Which unit has its HQ at Lympstone? What is the ITC Catterick? What is Faslane? Where are we currently deployed?

Knowledge: What is the different between an Astute SSN and a Vanguard SSBN? What do those acronyms mean? What is a Warrior? What is the largest regiment in the army? Where would the RM be placed in the tri-service order of precedence (no marks for "next to RGBW")? What calibre is the rifle? What colour beret do the Yorkshire Regiment wear? The Parachute Regiment? The Royal Signals? Who are the current CGS and CDS? Write out the full non-commissioned and commissioned rank structure of an infantry regiment, with badges of rank. What rank would the holder of the appointment of Company Sergeant Major be? Where does the army commissioning course take place? How long is it for a regular officer?

Current affairs: Who has just come back from Afghanistan? Who replaced them? Who is Matthew Croucher? How many troops are currently deployed in the Gulf? What is Camp Bastion?

That kind of thing. Nothing too tricky there; I know cadets who could answer most or all of that, so someone who has served should have no trouble. Perhaps she could try getting someone with actual experience in to help interview?

Curious what the job is :)
 
#13
Joe_Private said:
Where does the term 'Crab' come from?
Is it something to do with their uniform being the same colour as cream prescribed to get rid of crabs (the infestation, not the succulent seafood dish) ??
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#14
saintstone said:
Joe_Private said:
Where does the term 'Crab' come from?
Is it something to do with their uniform being the same colour as cream prescribed to get rid of crabs (the infestation, not the succulent seafood dish) ??
Or because they can't move forwards, or backwards, only sideways.... :D
 
#15
BLUESKINNEDBEAST said:
I was always under the impression that Lt Gen was senior as Lt Gen commanded Cavalry whereas Maj Gen commanded Infantry. Cavalry are senior to Infantry. Simple!
Nope...

A 'General Officer' originally commanded 'in general' - he did not specialise. He was in charge of both Inf and Cav but left the specialisation to his subordinates

Edit to add... much the same as in civvy street where the Director General is in overall charge of all the Directors (who have their own specialities)
 
#16
[wikipedia] Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. The rank traces its origins to the Middle Ages where the title of Lieutenant General was held by the second in command on the battlefield, who was normally subordinate to a Captain General.

In modern armies, Lieutenant General normally ranks immediately below General and above Major General; it is equivalent to the navy rank of Vice Admiral, and in Air Forces with a separate rank structure, it is equivalent to Air Marshal.

The term Major General is a shortened version of the previous term Sergeant Major General, which was also subordinate to Lieutenant General. This is why a Lieutenant General outranks a Major General, whereas a Major is senior to a Lieutenant. [/wikipedia]

There you go then...!
 
#17
Thanks for all the ideas, fellas. Knew I could count on you!

In answer to the job questions, it's an admin wallah for a foreign embassy in London.
 
#18
BZ BZ. Some good questions there.
And yes. Crab is short for Crab-fat, which was the slang name for the cream used to treat pubic lice, and came in a disgusting colour, the same hue as the uniform of the RAF, Crab-fat blue.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#19
CarpeDiem said:
Thanks for all the ideas, fellas. Knew I could count on you!

In answer to the job questions, it's an admin wallah for a foreign embassy in London.
I answered all the Q's without drawing breath (except possibly Largest Regiment? which I'm guessing right now is The Rifles (4 regular bns) .Intrigued to know what you think is the right answer :)

Two more for the pot:

- Someone shouts ' Blimey, here comes Fat Albert' - what can you expect to arrive?

- What's 'Rarden rash' and where would you get it?

Gizza job - I can do that - which embassy ?

PS - Crab Air - when the RNAS and the RFC merged to form the Royal Air Force at the end of WW1, the new service was issued with field gray greatcoats. Navy slang for the shade of paint used on warships
( and anywhere else they could slosh it that didn't move) is 'crab-fat grey'.....hence Crabs.
 
#20
Goatman said:
I answered all the Q's without drawing breath (except possibly Largest Regiment? which I'm guessing right now is The Rifles (4 regular bns) .Intrigued to know what you think is the right answer :)
The Royal Regiment of Artillery ;)

(which, to confuse you, is split into smaller regiments)

As I said, easy questions. But hard if you don't know them.
 

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