Question regarding drill - one for the Guardsmen?

diehard57

War Hero
Found this short video clip of the Guards on sentry duty at Windsor Castle about 100 years ago. What struck me was how slack the drill was back then and how casual the troops were on duty. So when did all the bending of the knee and halting and turning on the march and standing still as we know it first start?

 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Very interesting. I stood guard there many years ago on that post just outside the castle before it all changed.
I have no idea when it all went strictly like though.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Very interesting. I stood guard there many years ago on that post just outside the castle before it all changed.
I have no idea when it all went strictly like though.
1939 according to Pathe News


Not quite the 'bend the knee' but it got worse after that! :soldier:

If you really want to see shoite drill just look up the supposed legend RSM Britton. He would never have been passed off the square with that standard of crappiness.
 
Back then though there were no invading Nip or Chogie tourists taking pictures of everything and even for a Brit it would have been a long walk to go have a shufti.
 
We tend to think of the Army of that period as being even more b********y than today.I've seen blokes get locked up for drill on guard mount being better than that.
 
I have often heard that a lot of the shouty, stampy stuff came about during times of conscription, in order to instil discipline and uniformity in a large mobilised army, a considerable proportion of which would have included a somewhat reluctant (if not downright hostile) soldiery. The second part of WW1 would have marked a probable starting point, easing off somewhat after the end of hostilities.

It seemed to reach its apogee during and after WW2 and into National Service. After such an extended period of conscription, much of it appears to have been absorbed into post-conscription custom and practice and drill manual.
 
I have often heard that a lot of the shouty, stampy stuff came about during times of conscription, in order to instil discipline and uniformity in a large mobilised army, a considerable proportion of which would have been a somewhat reluctant (if not downright hostile) soldiery. The second part of WW1 would have marked a probable starting point, easing off somewhat after the end of hostilities.

It seemed to reach its apogee during and after WW2 and into National Service. After such an extended period of conscription, much of it appears to have been absorbed into post-conscription custom and practice and drill manual.
That does actually make sense. I've read a few books about National Service,the b******t was horrendous.
My old lot seemed to be stuck in that period.
 
If you hadnt shown that clip there probably would be people on here droning on about tradition and the importance of doing pointless things.
 
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Joe_Private

On ROPS
On ROPs
That does actually make sense. I've read a few books about National Service,the b******t was horrendous.
My old lot seemed to be stuck in that period.
@Provost was talking about wartime conscription, not National Service, two very different scenarios. I would be inclined to believe that during wartime, bullshït would have taken a back seat to operational effectiveness, and conversely, for National Servicemen who were never going to go on ops (and yes, I know that lots did) being in the Army was all about painting stones white and stomping around like proper soldiers.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
To be honest, the drill there (in both films) looks far more natural than the over-exaggerated that came later.

I've probably just upset lots of people.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
I've probably just upset lots of people.[/QUOTE]

"Take... his.... NAAAME!!!"
 
@Provost was talking about wartime conscription, not National Service, two very different scenarios. I would be inclined to believe that during wartime, bullshït would have taken a back seat to operational effectiveness, and conversely, for National Servicemen who were never going to go on ops (and yes, I know that lots did) being in the Army was all about painting stones white and stomping around like proper soldiers.
You forgot to mention lining said stones up in straight lines in officers carparks, just so they could park..............Regimentally.
 
Light division drill. You know it makes sense
Some bean counter has worked out, in these times of austerity, that if the whole Army adopted Light Division drill, the fact they'd get from A to B somewhat quicker than previously would save in excess of £20 million a year.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Some bean counter has worked out, in these times of austerity, that if the whole Army adopted Light Division drill, the fact they'd get from A to B somewhat quicker than previously would save in excess of £20 million a year.
Don’t. They’ll use that logic to cancel Boxer.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I’m beginning to wonder if all that bending of the knee is the cause for my arthritis in the left knee:-?
I can see it now.
Have you got a bad knee? Did you suffer needles bending the knee, thigh parallel to the ground and driving in the heel? Thousands like you are suffering, don’t suffer in silence. Give us a call, now!
 

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