Question ref tube vent electric

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PrinceAlbert

Guest
#2
I can only assume that the vent tube has a light bulb fitted so you can test the voltage getting to it, in case of a firing fault.

The same way we used to make test lamps for the AFV smoke tubes.
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#3
I can only assume that the vent tube has a light bulb fitted so you can test the voltage getting to it, in case of a firing fault.

The same way we used to make test lamps for the AFV smoke tubes.
By my recollection, spot on!
 
#7
Main thing I remember about vent tubes is the call of "RAMMER OUT" which meant that I'd be losing more skin off my fingers...
 
#9
Main thing I remember about vent tubes is the call of "RAMMER OUT" which meant that I'd be losing more skin off my fingers...
Or an Sqn Ldr's crew who shall remain nameless on BATUS, not waiting 30 mins* and just pulled the holder out to find a smoking vent tube. The penny dropped. The loader just managed to shove it back in, turn and click it into place before . . Boom! . . the slowly burning bag-charge decided to initiate. Cost the loader a shit load of beer and a very bruised arm when the breech block hit him before he could move out the way.

Can't totally recall the correct drill, but the theme is he pulled out a fired vent tube when he shouldn't have.
 
#10
As you know some Regiments used to make new Officers do a bit of time as an Operator before they commanded anything. It was part of the puppy-training process I imagine.

Cue the young 2LtPlume in the left hand side of the turret with a stoppage on the co-ax. "Stoppage, wait 15 minutes!" I cried.

"Don't be a ******* pouff, Sir, get it cleared!" shouted the SSgt Commander.

I lifted the top cover of the GPMG just as the round exploded & got a face & eyes full of brass case for my trouble. I never messed around with stoppages again...
 
#11
Or an Sqn Ldr's crew who shall remain nameless on BATUS, not waiting 30 mins* and just pulled the holder out to find a smoking vent tube. The penny dropped. The loader just managed to shove it back in, turn and click it into place before . . Boom! . . the slowly burning bag-charge decided to initiate. Cost the loader a shit load of beer and a very bruised arm when the breech block hit him before he could move out the way.

Can't totally recall the correct drill, but the theme is he pulled out a fired vent tube when he shouldn't have.
On MISFIRE from the Gnr the Cmdr would take a glance at the FNA and see what the indicator was saying...............In - no Vent Tube Ldr sticks another one on..............Out - there's one on there but now wait 30 mins to see if it's fired or not! In the meantime sit back and have a brew/beer!
 
#12
On MISFIRE from the Gnr the Cmdr would take a glance at the FNA and see what the indicator was saying...............In - no Vent Tube..............Out - there's one on there but now wait 30 mins to see if it's fired or not! In the meantime sit back and have a brew/beer!
... Until you spot your Op/Ldr 'surreptitiously' comparing number of charges to number of rounds in stowage and failing to reconcile the numbers.
 
#13
Had similar device on Cents,circuit tester as previously mentioned.Yes,I know,just wanted to get in on the act.
 
#14
On MISFIRE from the Gnr the Cmdr would take a glance at the FNA and see what the indicator was saying...............In - no Vent Tube..............Out - there's one on there but now wait 30 mins to see if it's fired or not! In the meantime sit back and have a brew/beer!
Cheers I knew it something like that. I was never grown-up enough to be let out the gunners seat, and my loading experience revolved around hungover days at Catterick and massive hangover days at Warcop :)
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#16
Can I tell the story about the ARRC Comd., the CO's (4 RTR) tank and the breech closing indicator again?
 
#17
I can only assume that the vent tube has a light bulb fitted so you can test the voltage getting to it, in case of a firing fault.

The same way we used to make test lamps for the AFV smoke tubes.
The issued Firing Circuit Testers (one per tank during my time) had a screw base for easily changing the bulb if blown, whereas the photo shows a modified used TVE.
Either an early example of a good idea that was then officially adopted, or an enterprising crew approaching handover found theirs to be diffy and got the machy wagon to knock up a quick replacement which would pass initial inspection.

There was also an issued tester for the smoke grenade dischargers but I never saw many of them and it was a PITA to use. I tended to use a modified coke-can with a bulb fitted and paint sand-papered off, slotted in very good and the ring-pull was perfect for pulling it out.
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#19
ISTR that had something to do with the Primary Seal Failure Indicator Pin!
It most certainly did and perhaps more to do with trained commander in the turret when doing live firing. Shall I tell the whole story, I was there!
 
#20
The issued Firing Circuit Testers (one per tank during my time) had a screw base for easily changing the bulb if blown, whereas the photo shows a modified used TVE.
Either an early example of a good idea that was then officially adopted, or an enterprising crew approaching handover found theirs to be diffy and got the machy wagon to knock up a quick replacement which would pass initial inspection.

There was also an issued tester for the smoke grenade dischargers but I never saw many of them and it was a PITA to use. I tended to use a modified coke-can with a bulb fitted and paint sand-papered off, slotted in very good and the ring-pull was perfect for pulling it out.
I never ever never ever never came across one as posh as that!

It most certainly did and perhaps more to do with trained commander in the turret when doing live firing. Shall I tell the whole story, I was there!
Yes please! :)
 

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