Question re joining the army reserves

Hello

I've been thinking about joining the army reserves and have some wonderings which I hope people can shine light on, if that's okay:

1. I've read that most people do a weekly drill night, one or two weekends a month, and then a two week training course. I am not sure if I would commit a weekend a month. The amount I was thinking about is a weekly drill night + the yearly training course + a weekend every 5-6 weeks (which is obviously almost that much). It adds up according to the days expected per year. What do people think of this?
2. Is it difficult to apply and enter as a reserve officer? How is this different from entering enlisted? Is it good to have an idea what role you might be able to contribute to before you apply?
3. I'm female and curious as to what experiences other women have had being in the reserves. I would be happy to also hear from men about gender differences.

Cheers
 
Hello

I've been thinking about joining the army reserves and have some wonderings which I hope people can shine light on, if that's okay:

1. I've read that most people do a weekly drill night, one or two weekends a month, and then a two week training course. I am not sure if I would commit a weekend a month. The amount I was thinking about is a weekly drill night + the yearly training course + a weekend every 5-6 weeks (which is obviously almost that much). It adds up according to the days expected per year. What do people think of this?
2. Is it difficult to apply and enter as a reserve officer? How is this different from entering enlisted? Is it good to have an idea what role you might be able to contribute to before you apply?
3. I'm female and curious as to what experiences other women have had being in the reserves. I would be happy to also hear from men about gender differences.

Cheers
Have you looked here
 
Your best bet is to find your local reserve centre (with the reserve centre finder below) and give them a phone call or drop them an email. Most will have a evening a month where people can just drop in and have a chat. Bear in mind that during initial training the expectation of attendance will probably be higher as there is a lot to get through and missing a weekend may mean not joining the unit as a full member at the same time as the people you started with and having to go back to the next group.


 
I'm in London btw. Do people have any units that they would recommend based on my post? Ive seen another thread that compliments the HAC. Any others? Cheers
 
I'm in London btw. Do people have any units that they would recommend based on my post? Ive seen another thread that compliments the HAC. Any others? Cheers

If you are spoilt for choice visit as many units as you can, and find out what jobs they do, then pick the one that offers the role you want. The HAC seem like a decent unit from what I've heard, but perhaps you aren't that interested in artillery and are more interested in engineering (to pick a random example). Or maybe if you can't commit as much time, look at a "national" unit. Good luck whichever you choose.
 
While going through initial (phase 1 & 2) training, you may need to commit a bit more in terms of weekends/evenings than one weekend every 5-6 weeks. Once through that, what you are describing is a fairly normal commitment.

However. if you join as an officer, I'd expect you to need to commit a bit more time than you have described. You're there to lead and manage soldiers and will be their first point of contact for a range of queries from career management, to welfare. Also, as you move up through the commissioned ranks, you'll potentially assume appointments which will require more of a time commitment than that.

In terms of units, as @Bob65 says, you're spoiled for choice in London.

In terms of experience of females in the reserves, I would say you have nothing to worry about. The current army policy on gender, race etc is highly progressive and accommodating - more so than many civilian employers.
 
One more tip - register on the Army jobs portal and start your application on there ASAP. There's no obligation whatsoever at this stage, but it can take a while to get paperwork through the system so the sooner the better really.
 

g4eddie

Old-Salt
If you are spoilt for choice visit as many units as you can, and find out what jobs they do, then pick the one that offers the role you want. The HAC seem like a decent unit from what I've heard, but perhaps you aren't that interested in artillery and are more interested in engineering (to pick a random example). Or maybe if you can't commit as much time, look at a "national" unit. Good luck whichever you choose.
Actually HAC has A-Bty which augments 7RHA along with doing P-Company.
So there are choices ....
 

Dwarf

LE
As mentioned if you cannot commit more time consider entering as a ranker when the commitment will be lesser than when commissioned. You can always apply for a commission later.
 
Hello

I've been thinking about joining the army reserves and have some wonderings which I hope people can shine light on, if that's okay:

1. I've read that most people do a weekly drill night, one or two weekends a month, and then a two week training course. I am not sure if I would commit a weekend a month. The amount I was thinking about is a weekly drill night + the yearly training course + a weekend every 5-6 weeks (which is obviously almost that much). It adds up according to the days expected per year. What do people think of this?
2. Is it difficult to apply and enter as a reserve officer? How is this different from entering enlisted? Is it good to have an idea what role you might be able to contribute to before you apply?
3. I'm female and curious as to what experiences other women have had being in the reserves. I would be happy to also hear from men about gender differences.

Cheers
It’s 2021, and I can honestly say that 99.99% of the Army or the Army Reserves don’t give a fxxk about the gender or gender differences of the person who they are working with.
Turn up on time, in the right kit and get stuck in, everyone’s a winner
 

westyboy

Clanker
I would strongly suggest if you can only make the time stated in your first post, to reconsider becoming an Officer in the AR.
Days expected, is the minimum requirement to achieve your bounty. If you are commanding a Platoon/Troop, you will have phone calls from your Soldiers on a daily basis about courses, pay issues etc. You will also have daily calls from your permanent staff regarding training delivery, OJARs, recruiting et al.


If the AR is something you'd like to explore with limited spare time available, do it as a Private Soldier first and get a feel.
 
I would strongly suggest if you can only make the time stated in your first post, to reconsider becoming an Officer in the AR.
Days expected, is the minimum requirement to achieve your bounty. If you are commanding a Platoon/Troop, you will have phone calls from your Soldiers on a daily basis about courses, pay issues etc. You will also have daily calls from your permanent staff regarding training delivery, OJARs, recruiting et al.


If the AR is something you'd like to explore with limited spare time available, do it as a Private Soldier first and get a feel.
However, if you are carrying out work outside of set training days you will be paid for your time
 
I would strongly suggest if you can only make the time stated in your first post, to reconsider becoming an Officer in the AR.
Days expected, is the minimum requirement to achieve your bounty. If you are commanding a Platoon/Troop, you will have phone calls from your Soldiers on a daily basis about courses, pay issues etc. You will also have daily calls from your permanent staff regarding training delivery, OJARs, recruiting et al.


If the AR is something you'd like to explore with limited spare time available, do it as a Private Soldier first and get a feel.

It's the leadership side of things that really appeals to me. Do you get paid for that time on the phone? I am a student now, doing an MA, and won't have a job come September so I can definitely commit more time than I stated in the original post at least at the beginning. I'm just not sure how the army reserves will fit into my life in the years to come. It sounds really worthwhile though.
 
One more tip - register on the Army jobs portal and start your application on there ASAP. There's no obligation whatsoever at this stage, but it can take a while to get paperwork through the system so the sooner the better really.
Cheers. I've started it - I just want to sort out a few London units to put down on the application before it goes through. So that's what I'm researching at the minute.
 

Snapper 25

Old-Salt
Once your past your basic training you can do as much or as little as you can or want to. If you don't do the minimum all that happens if you don't get your bounty and you won't get on any adventure training. For example, most regiments have a annual (pre covid), foreign skiing trip. Plus you can leave at any time. There really is nothing to loose.
 

Dwarf

LE
Once your past your basic training you can do as much or as little as you can or want to. If you don't do the minimum all that happens if you don't get your bounty and you won't get on any adventure training. For example, most regiments have a annual (pre covid), foreign skiing trip. Plus you can leave at any time. There really is nothing to loose.
Sure, but with the possible commission in mind an officer doing the minimum or less is not doing his/her task and is letting down their subordinates by not being there for them and helping supervise their training.
Taking on a commission in the Reserves should be a firm commitment in the mind of the officer. A ranker can take it or leave it far more easily which affects the unit and others less.
 
Do you have any idea at this stage of the particular role you want to do?
I am considering applying for intelligence officer. Really i'd be happy with any role where I can use my noggin to look after others and gain leadership skills. I enjoy physical fitness but it's by no means my strength. I'm more academic, especially when it comes to verbal communication.
 
I am considering applying for intelligence officer. Really i'd be happy with any role where I can use my noggin to look after others and gain leadership skills. I enjoy physical fitness but it's by no means my strength. I'm more academic, especially when it comes to verbal communication.

3MI is the Intelligence Corps reserve unit in London.

You will gain leadership skills at all levels, by the way.
 

Stibbon

Old-Salt
If you are commanding a Platoon/Troop, you will have phone calls from your Soldiers on a daily basis about courses, pay issues etc. You will also have daily calls from your permanent staff regarding training delivery, OJARs, recruiting et al.

Unlikely I'd say. And certainly not daily.

That's what Permanent Staff (PSAOs PSI's etc) are for. Soldiers won't be contacting another Reservist about stuff (unless specifically instructed to) that they can go straight to the horses mouth (as it were) with.

Most Reservists have either a full time job or a full-time educational commitment outside the Army Reserve in my experience so the only time anything really gets done (outside of e mails) is when they're actually on-site.
 

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