Question about dual nationality

#1
Hi, I’m planning to join the British Army as an Officer in the nearest future.

Here’s the pickle though - I hold dual citizenship, British and Russian. I’ve read through multiple posts on this forum that claim how dual citizenship might hinder the application process. That mainly applied to the Int corps however, the Corps that I’ve got no immediate interest in.

For the roles I’ve listed above - does anyone know if I would be expected to give up my Russian passport even if I wanted to apply for a non-INT role within the Army?

Look forward to your response!
 
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#2
On a positive note there are always a fair few people with dual citizenship. Just be honest when asked questions.
 
#3
Dual nationality is a double-edged sword, especially when one of those nationalities involves conscription.
 
#5
An issue of dual nationality comes to mind, concerning future children of HRH the Duke of Sussex There seems to be a tradition of members of the royal family serving in the military or naval services, as the Duke of Sussex, the Duke of Cambridge and others. As HRH the Duchess of Sussex is a US citizen any children will be legally US Citizens at birth.
She could avoid problems by renouncing her US citizenship as soon as she is granted UK citizenship. The down side is that she has presumable accumulated some assets from her acting career. The US collects taxes from citizens living abroad. A person who renounces citizenship is hit with a clawback of a percentage of adjusted net assets at the time of renunciation of citizenship.
The US Internal Revenue Service can be greedy bastards.
 

RP578

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#8
As HRH the Duchess of Sussex is a US citizen any children will be legally US Citizens at birth.
Up to a point Lord Copper. They won't be born US Citizens, but they will be eligible for US Citizenship. If you were born to parents, at least one of whom was a U.S. citizen at the time of your birth, you can automatically gain U.S. citizenship through the process of acquisition in many cases, regardless of whether you were born on U.S. or foreign soil.

The laws regarding citizenship obtained through acquisition are quite complex and take into account factors such as the citizenship of parents and whether the child was born outside of wedlock.

Acquisition of U.S. Citizenship by a Child Born Abroad
 
#9
Dual nationality is a double-edged sword, especially when one of those nationalities involves conscription.
Thanks for response. Conscripting in Russia would only take place if you live there on a permanent basis.

And Russian? Your DV/SC should be interesting and time consuming! ;)
Yeah, I reckon it might be best to apply in advance :)

On a positive note there are always a fair few people with dual citizenship. Just be honest when asked questions.
Good shout! I’m subscribed to an individual who currently serves in the British Army as a soldier and he claims that there are Russians serving in the military. Though he made no mention of their dual nationality.
 
#10
Dual nationality is a double-edged sword, especially when one of those nationalities involves conscription.

I have it with Germany, never an issue as I was legally ordinarily resident out of Germany - serving in HM Forces - although I was in BAOR. They never tried to conscript me though a General asked me to direct entry from HMF as a Feldwebel.

My oppo for a couple of years also had a French passport through his mum. He joined up in UK for three years rather than France for around 18 months conscription because the French only paid about a tenner a week to conscripts. Once he was in HMF the French lost interest in him.

There are though a couple or three nations who point blank insist on national service if you hold their passport, regardless of what else you have done. So the OP would need to ensure that Vlad could never come knocking.
 
#11
An issue of dual nationality comes to mind, concerning future children of HRH the Duke of Sussex There seems to be a tradition of members of the royal family serving in the military or naval services, as the Duke of Sussex, the Duke of Cambridge and others. As HRH the Duchess of Sussex is a US citizen any children will be legally US Citizens at birth.
She could avoid problems by renouncing her US citizenship as soon as she is granted UK citizenship. The down side is that she has presumable accumulated some assets from her acting career. The US collects taxes from citizens living abroad. A person who renounces citizenship is hit with a clawback of a percentage of adjusted net assets at the time of renunciation of citizenship.
The US Internal Revenue Service can be greedy bastards.
I am pretty, pretty, sure that she cannot be HRH Duchess of Sussex and an American citizen. Does US law not prohibit the acceptance and use of foreign titles?

I recall reading that Storming Norman was deemed worthy of a K of some flavor and in reality had to receive a lesser piece of bling.
 
#12
I am pretty, pretty, sure that she cannot be HRH Duchess of Sussex and an American citizen. Does US law not prohibit the acceptance and use of foreign titles?

I recall reading that Storming Norman was deemed worthy of a K of some flavor and in reality had to receive a lesser piece of bling.
The restriction is based on the Foreign Emoluments Clause of the US Constitution which states:
"No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State"

This has been held to involve an actual grant of a title by a King, foreign state etc. The clause has been much discussed recently as politicians opposed to Trump tried (and failed) to find proof that he had accepted any financial emolument from Russia. A two year investigation by a staff of 60+ failed to find any evidence that he did so.

The Duke of Sussex received his title from the Queen immediately before his marriage and she has a title not granted by the Queen but as the normal title result of marriage. Titles gained by marriage or descent do not trigger the provisions of the emoluments clause as they are not granted to individuals by a sovereign.

My recollection of the situation of General Norman Schwarzkopf and General Colin Powell after Desert Storm was that the US government was notified of the Queens wish to honor them and Congress consented to the grant to them as Knights Commander of the Bath. After WW II the king, George VI, similarly made the same award to General Eisenhower and IIRC General Douglas McArthur.

I have no expertise in UK law but I suspect that the wife of the Duke of Sussex is entitled to be considered the Duchess of Sussex. I do know that in the unlikely event I should meet the lady I would not address her with "Hi Meghan"
 
#13
The restriction is based on the Foreign Emoluments Clause of the US Constitution which states:
"No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State"

This has been held to involve an actual grant of a title by a King, foreign state etc. The clause has been much discussed recently as politicians opposed to Trump tried (and failed) to find proof that he had accepted any financial emolument from Russia. A two year investigation by a staff of 60+ failed to find any evidence that he did so.

The Duke of Sussex received his title from the Queen immediately before his marriage and she has a title not granted by the Queen but as the normal title result of marriage. Titles gained by marriage or descent do not trigger the provisions of the emoluments clause as they are not granted to individuals by a sovereign.

My recollection of the situation of General Norman Schwarzkopf and General Colin Powell after Desert Storm was that the US government was notified of the Queens wish to honor them and Congress consented to the grant to them as Knights Commander of the Bath. After WW II the king, George VI, similarly made the same award to General Eisenhower and IIRC General Douglas McArthur.

I have no expertise in UK law but I suspect that the wife of the Duke of Sussex is entitled to be considered the Duchess of Sussex. I do know that in the unlikely event I should meet the lady I would not address her with "Hi Meghan"
Informative, thank you.:)
 
#14
I’m afraid you’ll have difficulties in every arm as an officer with Russian citizenship. Even if you were to renounce it, it doesn’t get over the fact that you were Russian and that - presumably - you still have Russian connections.

You could always apply to SIS; in the past they didn’t seem to fussed about those with Russian connections, provided you were bu&&ered senseless at Cambridge.
 
#15
An issue of dual nationality comes to mind, concerning future children of HRH the Duke of Sussex There seems to be a tradition of members of the royal family serving in the military or naval services, as the Duke of Sussex, the Duke of Cambridge and others. As HRH the Duchess of Sussex is a US citizen any children will be legally US Citizens at birth.
She could avoid problems by renouncing her US citizenship as soon as she is granted UK citizenship. The down side is that she has presumable accumulated some assets from her acting career. The US collects taxes from citizens living abroad. A person who renounces citizenship is hit with a clawback of a percentage of adjusted net assets at the time of renunciation of citizenship.
The US Internal Revenue Service can be greedy bastards.
Fortunately, Buck Palace, The Tower, The Jewels, Windsor Castle , Balmoral, and Sandringham, belong to the nation, and Hollywood has not exactly fallen over itself to cast her in major roles since she entered the biz because she is an okay-ish actress, not a great one.
 
#16
The restriction is based on the Foreign Emoluments Clause of the US Constitution which states:
"No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State"

This has been held to involve an actual grant of a title by a King, foreign state etc. The clause has been much discussed recently as politicians opposed to Trump tried (and failed) to find proof that he had accepted any financial emolument from Russia. A two year investigation by a staff of 60+ failed to find any evidence that he did so.

The Duke of Sussex received his title from the Queen immediately before his marriage and she has a title not granted by the Queen but as the normal title result of marriage. Titles gained by marriage or descent do not trigger the provisions of the emoluments clause as they are not granted to individuals by a sovereign.

My recollection of the situation of General Norman Schwarzkopf and General Colin Powell after Desert Storm was that the US government was notified of the Queens wish to honor them and Congress consented to the grant to them as Knights Commander of the Bath. After WW II the king, George VI, similarly made the same award to General Eisenhower and IIRC General Douglas McArthur.

I have no expertise in UK law but I suspect that the wife of the Duke of Sussex is entitled to be considered the Duchess of Sussex. I do know that in the unlikely event I should meet the lady I would not address her with "Hi Meghan"
Why not?
Before she met HRH Ging, she worked as an actress. She not that attractive IMHO, and I suspect the casting couch was a feature of her rise to the top. So in those circumstances Hi Meghan would be an appropriate form of greeting.
 
#17
I’m afraid you’ll have difficulties in every arm as an officer with Russian citizenship. Even if you were to renounce it, it doesn’t get over the fact that you were Russian and that - presumably - you still have Russian connections.

You could always apply to SIS; in the past they didn’t seem to fussed about those with Russian connections, provided you were bu&&ered senseless at Cambridge.
I'm afraid I'm a bit short on degrees from Cambridge.

On a separate note - I have spoken to 2 parties (unrelated to each other) that I believe spoke about the same person they know about through a friend of a friend who served in the Navy on a nuclear submarine. And he was Russian. Obviously people like him wouldn't be allowed into certain parts of the command chain etc, but the fact that he was allowed there speaks volumes.
 

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