Pushing through the pain barrier

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by militarymen, Jan 26, 2009.

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  1. Only 4 weeks till Phase 1 training at Pirbright and I'm worried that I am not mentally prepared to take on the tough physical training.

    I go running every other day, but I always back down when it gets to that point where you think you're gonna be sick and feels like you've got weights tied to your feet and therefore I don't really see much physical improvement.

    I realise it's more a mental issue than physical, so I want to know what it is many of you are thinking about to keep focused and what it is that drives you through the pain barrier?

    Maybe having a PTI shouting in my ear will be the thing that keeps me going at Phase 1, but any advice on making me mentally stronger beforehand would be appreciated.

    Also, should I expect I'll be spewing after every PT session when I start basic?
  2. Wanting to be a British Army soldier should be enough to keep you going (but the PTIs will certainly help!). Besides its only 14 weeks...
  3. your section, oppo, pti, ds will all "motivate" you, as long as you give 100% you will be fine, dont jack and make sure you help your mates
  4. Agree with above. You'll be motivated. You'd be amazed what you're capable of when your mates are relying on you, don't sweat it, keep up the training and enjoy.
  5. The bad attention you know you'll gain if you stop will be worse than carrying on running, so you'll carry on. It's always easier when there's others around you going through the same, you challenge each other, take each others mind off of the run.
  6. Heres a bit of practice for you, do the squat wall press (electric chair) whilst trying to read a book or doing sums in your head.
    Basically lean your back against the door/wall and slide down untill its as if you are sitting on an invisible chair and keep your hands to your sides or holding the book. Doing this regularaly will not only start to make you immune to pain and help you push through it in future but it will also kick start developing some wheels on yah and strengthen your core.

    If you try it let me know how long you last. You'll see why they call it the electric chair. :wink:
  7. I would of thought your motivation should be wanting to complete what ever task your given to the best of your ability, if you don't you might fail and failure should not be an option. If your concerned about running i find it's all in the head, drive yourself forward, how far you running until you feel fucked anyway??

    Like other arrsers have said you will be amazed what you can do with a bit of 'encouragement' from the intsructors....

    Put simply your main thing that will get you though phase 1 will be the concept of getting to phase 2.... :wink:
  8. Thank you for your replies...I'll definately make the electric chair part of my routine.

    I do want to be in the Army more than anything. I guess I know the physical part is going to be a real struggle for me being 29 and not always having been the most active person in the past. I'm having to do a lot of catching up.

    I think my fear is to be the back of the class and letting others down. Aha! I just answered my own question, there lies my motivation. I'm sure it'll be like a rocket up my arse when I'm actually in there doing it and i'm amongst others.

    Thanks for letting me 'out' my worries!
  9. Wouldn't worry its hard to push your self through pain barrier dont worry instructors will do it easily .
  10. i like that woody, it could be a classic quote :wink:
  11. If you're a civvy and you can make yourself run until you want to chuck then I think you'll be alright. Unless this happens after 400 yards, of course.

    Break your routine up. If you are running on the streets, use lamp posts and run 2, sprint 2. Do that for a bit and then get back to your vomiting in your own time.
  12. Well (reminding all that I'm a bird joining the REME), I'll be chucking at the end of a 2.4km run if trying to beat my current 12.30 minute time. It's the speed that get's me. I can run about 6K at a more gentle pace.

    That's what I'm worried about. 12.3 was good enough at basic, but I haven't been able to improve on it at all since and they say you should be doing it in 11 by the time you start basic.

    Is that utterly rubbish?
  13. I finish basic taining on friday.

    The furthest i have had to run is 4 miles on relatively flat ground. And 4 miles heath running (over hills) so if you can run continuosly for 4 miles you'll be ok. But everyhthing in basic training is progressive you'll start off short distance and slow speed and work your way up. The phsical PT is fairly easy so dont worry about it.
    Also did a 6 mile tab but thats not running.

    Shame your not 30. 30 and above get 11 minutes to run the mile and half
  14. I was amased by myself on saturday! Just saw the results of my hard training work! did'nt realise my training had such an effect untill i was supposed to meet my mates at the bus station at 7.30 to go on a night out, but missed my bus from home, so i ran about half a mile to try get the bus from there, but unfortunatly saw that one dissapering into the distence too, but that goes round a circuit so i ran has fast has i could to try and catch it still but i did'nt, so i had no choice but to leg it the 2miles into town! In some knee boots! I got there at 7.32 from setting off at quater past!! Legs are fucked now though lol!! running in heels aint good!
  15. And I would have driven just behind you...

    Lots of encouragement though, a few choice words, plenty of help - that sort of thing