Push fit copper fittings

Camm1

LE
I need to relocate a radiator to an adjacent wall. In the past when I've done anything like this I've soldered the joints but this one is going to be a little tight in the corners. Anyone have any experience with copper push fit fittings?

Are they ok for use in central heating systems?

Any help appreciated. (Mr Bane, stand easy)
 

lert

LE
You need to make sure they're properly seated, and then make sure again. But other than that they're fine. Expensive mind...
 

4(T)

LE
Yes, they are very good for emergency repairs where you don't want plastic push fit on display. They are also much less bulky than plastic.

They are irremovable, of course - unlike the plastic types. Once on, you have to cut them off.
 
Used 4 right angles to step new rads away from the wall to fit existing pipes. Been 3 years no leaks.
Yet!
 
Any help appreciated. (Mr Bane, stand easy)
You could do worse than M R BANE Plumbery Ltd. The proprietor Mr Bane himself change my water cylinder for me. Apart from the sometimes worrying loud gurgle or two, I am delighted with his work.

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You need to make sure they're properly seated, and then make sure again. But other than that they're fine. Expensive mind...
Expensive compared to end feed fittings but then, so are solder ring, compression and plastic. For a single radiator though, the cost is secondary to the ease of use in a tight corner. Not worth worrying about.
 
The tightest fittings are the solder end- feed..... I've never been keen on the copper push- fits, once you've put them together they can't be dissasembled.

Could you not fabricate the pipework straights and elbows, then use a conex joint on the last connection to the old site ?
 

Mrsheeny

War Hero
I need to relocate a radiator to an adjacent wall. In the past when I've done anything like this I've soldered the joints but this one is going to be a little tight in the corners. Anyone have any experience with copper push fit fittings?

Are they ok for use in central heating systems?

Any help appreciated. (Mr Bane, stand easy)
I’m a plumber by trade, put a photo on here of existing and where it’s going and I’ll give you some advice.
 

Camm1

LE
I’m a plumber by trade, put a photo on here of existing and where it’s going and I’ll give you some advice.
Thanks for offer of help.

Below are the pics and a sketch.

You can see the pipes are close to the wall and although it already looks a bit grotty, I don't want to mess up the decor any more.
My idea was to replace the soldered elbows at the bottom of the down pipes with the push fit elbows and just go straight through the wall to the new rad position. Any advice appreciated.


On a separate issue, would it be ok to add an additional radiator into the system as shown? (its 1 400mm x 1000.. k11) The boiler is rated at 82000 BTU and adding the extra one would take the rads installed to 64000 BTU. there would be no thermostatic valve on it just a straight flow through.
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I'd cut the pipework a few inches up on the other side of the wall, as it drops down, do all the pipework in endfeed, then do the final linkup in a straight conex.

I would swap the pipes over, with the bottom one going over to the top, then the top one coming down, elbow to horizontal, then elbow to 90 degree to go through the wall.

It would keep the pipework nice and neat on the other side of the wall.

Don't forget to fit a drain cock at the end of the run, and FFS, take the washer assembly out of it before soldering.

An extra rad shouldn't be a problem.
 
Crikey, if I'm not mistaken the copper pipework you have shown is 22mm. I believe that it's usual to have a 22mm flow and return with the rads tapping off this circuit. Any plumbers in?
 
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