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Purity Laws - Beer, Bread, Sausages & Cider.

Brains have "sort of " got the taste, but nothing like the W Country or S Wales, if you like the taste, I've posted the home made recipe on here some time ago........


Faggots.


1 500 gm batch of minced pork (Aldi)

About the same weight of pig's liver, dressed then minced.

2 slices of bread, minced.

About 2 onions, minced, gently fry them first, till golden, otherwise, they will repeat.

Half a box of stuffing, plus some sage and white pepper.

Mix well, then roll into balls, about 100gms is perfect, 2 each.

At this point freeze what you don't need..... that recipe will give about 4 servings.

Place on a tin foil tray, then add a good Bisto powder, gravy, plus a little Oxo to suit the numbers.

20 minutes, covered, then 10- 15 minutes, uncovered.

Serve with mushy peas and crunchy chips, or mash.


That's my near enough recipe........ you MUST cook the onions first, otherwise you'll burp all night
 
we can’t handle Stella in Britain, so the abv was reduced.
Interesting 'Stella' fact:
"In 2012, AB InBev lobbyists, Portland Communications, were exposed in a political scandal in the United Kingdom, when a member of the Labour opposition party pointed out that the company, then owned by Tim Allan, a former advisor to ex-Prime Minister Tony Blair, was trying to remove the expression "wife beater" from this Wikipedia article.[17][18] The effort related to Stella Artois carrying that nickname in the United Kingdom, due to a perceived connection between binge drinking and domestic violence. " - wikipaedia
 
A very good point. I will try most things once but I can't get on with eating offal as a thing. Tripe in particular is ******* minging but kidneys and liver are also on the list.

Mince it up and put it in a sausage or a haggis and I can't get enough of the stuff.
We are going off piste here, but...have you never had devilled kidneys?
Basic recipe: kidneys. The little bits are supposed to be snipped out. Ask butcher to do it. Dust in flour and fry (my Nan always used to fry in bacon fat). Add Worcestershire sauce, mustard and a thickener. Cream in the old days, I like sour cream.
Serve on toast, with a rasher of smokey bacon and a glass of brandy.
Best eaten on a frosty morning after a shoot. And I know this will upset platoon sergeants everywhere: before the guns are cleaned.
 
Lord Wellington abolished duty on cider, but it was then reintroduced during WWI and kept until 1923, reintroduced in 1976 and has been with us ever since

Cider like mead is if done right a quite natural product so it would make sense if it was once seen as healthy, rather than a drink for chavs and alcoholics like it's seen in the modern age
 
We are going off piste here, but...have you never had devilled kidneys?
Basic recipe: kidneys. The little bits are supposed to be snipped out. Ask butcher to do it. Dust in flour and fry (my Nan always used to fry in bacon fat). Add Worcestershire sauce, mustard and a thickener. Cream in the old days, I like sour cream.
Serve on toast, with a rasher of smokey bacon and a glass of brandy.
Best eaten on a frosty morning after a shoot. And I know this will upset platoon sergeants everywhere: before the guns are cleaned.
Best soaked in water overnight, too. The taste of piddle can be offputting.
 
We are going off piste here, but...have you never had devilled kidneys?
Basic recipe: kidneys. The little bits are supposed to be snipped out. Ask butcher to do it. Dust in flour and fry (my Nan always used to fry in bacon fat). Add Worcestershire sauce, mustard and a thickener. Cream in the old days, I like sour cream.
Serve on toast, with a rasher of smokey bacon and a glass of brandy.
Best eaten on a frosty morning after a shoot. And I know this will upset platoon sergeants everywhere: before the guns are cleaned.
Nope, I've tried kidneys rare and medium, both times I didn't like them. Part of it might be meeting kidneys, liver etc. while setting up dissections before tasting them (separate occasions!). The smell of boiling liver still makes me want to vomit.

Honestly, if it came to a choice of eating every part of an animal or going vegetarian I'd be veggie in a heartbeat. Much as I like meat I'd rather have less of it than eat the manky bits. Unless they're in sausage or haggis obviously.
 
Lord Wellington abolished duty on cider, but it was then reintroduced during WWI and kept until 1923, reintroduced in 1976 and has been with us ever since

Cider like mead is if done right a quite natural product so it would make sense if it was once seen as healthy, rather than a drink for chavs and alcoholics like it's seen in the modern age
Unfortunately, current rules mean that the apple content in ciders is absurdly low. I think this an EU thing, and if so hope we as a country (on leaving the EU) can make it a worthy product instead of the drink you describe it as.
Current producers I really like are Charlie, the landlord of the Square and Compass pub in Worth Matravers, Dorset. He also has a brewery in Swanage. Great beer, ace pub, cider a bit strong:cool:
And the guy up the road from him who does the Lulworth Skipper cider. It’s a bloke who presses in his garden and sells cider from his garage. Nothing more grand than that. If you are passing, he will show you the kit. Takes 10 seconds.
I think both deliver local, so as far as Bovington and Poole.
 
Nope, I've tried kidneys rare and medium, both times I didn't like them. Part of it might be meeting kidneys, liver etc. while setting up dissections before tasting them (separate occasions!). The smell of boiling liver still makes me want to vomit.

Honestly, if it came to a choice of eating every part of an animal or going vegetarian I'd be veggie in a heartbeat. Much as I like meat I'd rather have less of it than eat the manky bits. Unless they're in sausage or haggis obviously.
Hairy muff.
Not that I’m tempting you any further into the territory of ‘manky bits’.
And, it’s about time I made my excuses and left....
 
It was partly brought in in 1516 to ensure other grains, (wheat and rye) were kept to be used for bread, not to protect the quality of the beer. By the Mid 1500s variations of ingredients were allowed, wheat, bay leaf, and corriander specificaly.

I should think the name of the law holds a small clue as to its intent.
 
Unfortunately, current rules mean that the apple content in ciders is absurdly low. I think this an EU thing, and if so hope we as a country (on leaving the EU) can make it a worthy product instead of the drink you describe it as.
Current producers I really like are Charlie, the landlord of the Square and Compass pub in Worth Matravers, Dorset. He also has a brewery in Swanage. Great beer, ace pub, cider a bit strong:cool:
And the guy up the road from him who does the Lulworth Skipper cider. It’s a bloke who presses in his garden and sells cider from his garage. Nothing more grand than that. If you are passing, he will show you the kit. Takes 10 seconds.
I think both deliver local, so as far as Bovington and Poole.

Not local anymore, but the Square and Compass was always good for a summer stroll, big public car park nearby, a pint in the pub then a stroll down to the coast past the bat caves and onto the man made caves by the sea, even had the odd rave down in the caves there late at night

The bat caves were all a good lure if you were trying to pull a goth girl...
 
I used to eat bierwurst a lot in Germany, but have actually only found it once here in the UK (at Lidl, last year). It's nothing to do with bier, and has none in it; it's a snack to be nibbled with your bier, and is fabulous. The online German groceries have been very low on everything recently; let's hope they can resurge soon...

Correct. The bierschinken I get at the German deli is for snacking with beer and is more a cooked salami. Juicy and tasty. Chopped onion, dill, senf, bierschinken and salted butter on a slice of Berliner landbrot.
 
Surely this is an old wive‘s tale?
Not from my experience. The whiff should tell you whether the wee has drained out or not. I think Delia recommends salted water.
Edit: checked.... no, she doesn't mention it. Must have been me mum's advice.
 
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Unfortunately, current rules mean that the apple content in ciders is absurdly low. I think this an EU thing, and if so hope we as a country (on leaving the EU) can make it a worthy product instead of the drink you describe it as.

I wholeheartedly agree. We should also look at other quality products from these Isles, such as Melton Mowbray pork pies, Double Gloucester, proper Cheddar from Cheddar etc etc.

Surely this is an old wive‘s tale?

No, same with rabbit, bowl of water and half a tsp of salt, just removes that "tang".
 
I wholeheartedly agree. We should also look at other quality products from these Isles, such as Melton Mowbray pork pies, Double Gloucester, proper Cheddar from Cheddar etc etc.



No, same with rabbit, bowl of water and half a tsp of salt, just removes that "tang".
Is that rabbit? Didn’t know it had a tang.
 
Is that rabbit? Didn’t know it had a tang.

In the wild apparently, they don't actually drink water, they just get the moisture they need from grass, roots etc. If they are not soaked overnight in a brine solution, they do taste and smell different because of the urea.
 
In the wild apparently, they don't actually drink water, they just get the moisture they need from grass, roots etc. If they are not soaked overnight in a brine solution, they do taste and smell different because of the urea.
Everyday a school day and all that.
Last time I had rabbit was in France and it was slathered in mustard. It was Ok. Anyone I have ever spoken to about cooking rabbit has said that it needs lots of other flavours as it is essentially tasteless and just protein for the pot.
 

Chef

LE
Weakening of beer has been going for over a hundred years. British beer used to have some strength to it. WW1 had the government reduce the strength of beer. The brewers gladly fell in step as they could make more profit (“guvmit made it weaker, sir, sorry, still same price).
Then add this wave of ‘premium’ beers. Mainly foreign names and you pay more. Yes, it’s called ‘Peroni’, but it’s made in a factory in Britain.
Only we can’t handle Stella in Britain, so the abv was reduced.
Aldi are selling cases of Lowenbrau. Seems OK. The beer is 3.5%. That is made in a pish factory in the U.K. I refuse to believe the Germans would send a table beer to help us out.
It is profiteering, nothing more and nothing less. When you are allowed in your pub and pay the privilege of nigh on a fiver for a pint of Carling, please remember that.

I'd dispute that statement, Stella was quite strong 4.8-5.2 less than Fullers ESB 5.5, Bishop's finger 5.4 both freely available behind the bar. At the same time as Stella and still available.

Stella's USP was its quality and cost (remember the 'Reassuringly Expensive ads?) Come the millennium and Interbrew becomes Interbev and starts cost cutting, the Barley is cut with cheaper Maize and the ABV reduced. The embossed cans are likewise replaced with printed cans.

So less the UK couldn't handle the high ABV, albeit one lower than some premium national beers more that the accountants got their sticky fingers on the product. The effect was that from double digit growth in the 90s it went into a similar decline at the turn of the century and picked up the 'wife beater' label on the way.
 
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