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Purity Laws - Beer, Bread, Sausages & Cider.

"I don't get why people think Magners is cider in the first place."

Prompted by this quote from another thread, it got me thinking about the German purity laws for bier and sausages etc. The laws only allow for good old fashioned produce like water and grain in bier and meat % in wurst.

We alternatively have beer that, if I remember correctly (?), the producer doesn't have to disclose ingredients, bread with all sorts, but lacking flour and yeast, sausages the same, and cider with no apples?

When did this all start happening, and are these EU laws? How do manufacturers get away with calling things Cider as apposed to Cider like drink?

Do you care what you eat and drink, or do you stay clear of White bread, Richmond Pink sausages and Strongbow like drinks? I have thought for a while that what we consume may be causing more issues than we realise, but then, most of us can't afford to up the shopping budget by 400% to but free range meat or artisan breads.

Your take on things, and those with industry/law experience, welcomed.
 
Sausages I get from Rawlings butchers in Abergavenny. Heck sausages at a push.

Cider is Westons Wyld Wood organic stuff. Very nice but does make one's legs go a bit wobbly.
 
Richmond sausages are mostly made from ground up pigskin, snouts and ears ect, there's no actual " meat " in them.

I used to get them free by the box load from FarmFoods bin but I couldn't eat them, I cooked a load but threw them out down the garden and no wildlife touched them nor did they go off, they just dried out into hardened penetrator rods.
 
Sausages I get from Rawlings butchers in Abergavenny. Heck sausages at a push.

Cider is Westons Wyld Wood organic stuff. Very nice but does make one's legs go a bit wobbly.

Westons here is now cheaper than my local supermarkets own brand cider since the minimum price law came in

Could be worse things in life

Have you tried Gwynt y Ddraig Black Dragon that's not bad for mass produced cider
 
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P.O.N.T.I

War Hero
I thought the Germans have had previous 'issues' with purity laws............
 
but then, most of us can't afford to up the shopping budget by 400% to but free range meat or artisan breads.

Buying quality produce does not have to break the bank. Local farm stores, farmers markets and a good butchers can be very competative, pricewise.
I can't get proper Somerset cider or Somerset cheddar where I live, so I stock up when I go home. However that doesn't mean I can't get good cider and cheese where I live.



Local meat and fish (especially) are excellent. I can quite happily survive without too much processed food and it isn't that much more expensive.
 
Richmond sausages are mostly made from ground up pigskin, snouts and ears ect, there's no actual " meat " in them.

I used to get them free by the box load from FarmFoods bin but I couldn't eat them, I cooked a load but threw them out down the garden and no wildlife touched them nor did they go off, they just dried out into hardened penetrator rods.
An interesting take on 'Hide the sausage' there.

My test for an edible sausage has always been the knife test. Normal cutlery, not a steak or sharpend knife.
Push knife into sausage and if it is squashed and doesnt give enough resistance to pierce the skin, then it goes in the bin. I don't even bother giving it to the dog. All Richmond sausages squash on first contact with a knife.
 
I've just been down the farm shop down the lane that rears and sells its own meats and 6 sausinges cost £4, 10 rashers £3.50 and six eggs £1.50.
 
One of the huge drawbacks to purity laws is they stifle innovation. It’s marvellous that most German towns boast breweries proudly declaiming ‘seit xxxx’ but that discourages innovation. Which is what it was intended for, I suppose. The downside is that by discouraging innovation you are living in the past and protecting existing businesses.
I am not sure, but I think the German law originated in Bavaria and a condition on German unification was that it was kept; hence adopted countrywide and outlawing more obscure styles like gose from the Leipzig area (a wheat beer with added salt).
The upside is it helps brewers concentrate on making better beer and not hiding imperfections with adjuncts and/or flavourings.
The Isle of Man also has a beer purity law, and they produce some excellent ales (eg Okells).
Cheers!
 
The upside is it helps brewers concentrate on making better beer and not hiding imperfections with adjuncts and/or flavourings.
The Isle of Man also has a beer purity law, and they produce some excellent ales (eg Okells).
Cheers!

Which is the point I suppose? I have no issue with innovation, it's more to do with filling it out with cheap, potentially dangerous rubbish.

I didn't know about The Isle of Man, I'll have a look.

Cheers!

Whilst I'm here, two real ciders I would highly recommend, since Thatchers started giving me pain due to lack of apples and too much CO2.

Gasping Goose from Newton Court Cider
and
 
Which is the point I suppose? I have no issue with innovation, it's more to do with filling it out with cheap, potentially dangerous rubbish.

I didn't know about The Isle of Man, I'll have a look.

Cheers!

Whilst I'm here, two real ciders I would highly recommend, since Thatchers started giving me pain due to lack of apples and too much CO2.

Gasping Goose from Newton Court Cider
and
14 posts and noone has mentioned Old Rosie cider ?
 
One of the huge drawbacks to purity laws is they stifle innovation. It’s marvellous that most German towns boast breweries proudly declaiming ‘seit xxxx’ but that discourages innovation. Which is what it was intended for, I suppose. The downside is that by discouraging innovation you are living in the past and protecting existing businesses.
I am not sure, but I think the German law originated in Bavaria and a condition on German unification was that it was kept; hence adopted countrywide and outlawing more obscure styles like gose from the Leipzig area (a wheat beer with added salt).
The upside is it helps brewers concentrate on making better beer and not hiding imperfections with adjuncts and/or flavourings.
The Isle of Man also has a beer purity law, and they produce some excellent ales (eg Okells).
Cheers!

The original 1516 reinheitsgebot was to prevent folks putting all kinds of shit in beer. It was (and still is) regarded as a food, so anything laying about going spare that was even vaguely edible was ending up in the beer and people were getting sick from drinking rancid pig bum ale.

The grosse kase at the time figured the only way to stop the lunacy was to limit brewers to three ingredients, namely barley or wheat malt, hops and water. They weren't quite up to speed on the yeast thing yet, and having the village virgin spit a manky salivary mix of furry tongue, phlegm and rotting teeth seemed to do the trick, so no yeast was mentioned in the original laws.
 
One of the huge drawbacks to purity laws is they stifle innovation. It’s marvellous that most German towns boast breweries proudly declaiming ‘seit xxxx’ but that discourages innovation. Which is what it was intended for, I suppose. The downside is that by discouraging innovation you are living in the past and protecting existing businesses.
I am not sure, but I think the German law originated in Bavaria and a condition on German unification was that it was kept; hence adopted countrywide and outlawing more obscure styles like gose from the Leipzig area (a wheat beer with added salt).
The upside is it helps brewers concentrate on making better beer and not hiding imperfections with adjuncts and/or flavourings.
The Isle of Man also has a beer purity law, and they produce some excellent ales (eg Okells).
Cheers!

I don’t want innovation. I don’t care that the likes of Warsteiner, Bitburg and Kirner haven’t changed in centuries. They are simply the best beers I have ever had. If I had to choose the manner of my death, it would be to drown in a vat of Wobbly. I don’t want them to change it.

Even the inexpensive “Toll Im Preis“ TIP beer from real/- was tolerable. But a 0.5L stemmed glass, or 1L stein of chilled draught Warsteiner on a warm summer’s day is my Utopia.
 

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