Public sector fat cats

#1
#2
#4
What got me about the NHS when I was contracting there wasn't particularly the salaries or pensions of the senior non-clinical management. After all, good people needed to be attracted to the role.

However I question whether the people in the senior posts were the best people. One example that sticks in the mind was a Director who was the only one at that level in the building a couple of days before Christmas with authority t sign something I needed to be dealt with there and then as, with typical NHS planning skills it was the last day for a BACS run or someone wouldn't get paid before the New Year.

Said Director was running round the office with her head in her hands announcing to all and sundry, "I'm in a tizzy, such a tizzy. I can;t think, I'm in such a tizzy". This did not inspire confidence - how much better to have gone into her office, asked her PA to bring a coffee or glass of water, taken a deep breath & composed herself, then come out ready to face the world. I've seen very young LCpls show more leadership.

The other thing that got up my nose was that to go with the Director status they then needed a Business Manager and PA, official car and all sorts of other perks to show how important they were. Add to that he merry-go-round of being able to take early retirement on a pension on a Friday, then come back into work the following Monday as a consultant in the same role & it's easy to see where the money actually goes...
 
#5
I think Jarrod has been bluffing us over his pension.
 
#6
Add to that he merry-go-round of being able to take early retirement on a pension on a Friday, then come back into work the following Monday as a consultant in the same role & it's easy to see where the money actually goes...
I took redundancy from a public sector job and went back a month later on more money doing the same job.

Cheers easy :)
 
#8
12 years? You were lucky.
 
#9
As the NHS gets salami sliced, it amazes me how many more directors/CEOs etc have been promoted on circa £100k each, yet NHS employers don't complain, as I expect they can't wait for their next promotion, then redundancy, as part of the NHS 5 years restructuring cycle.
 
Last edited:
#10
No - it's a bullshit answer that could simply have been covered by 'the answer to that question is not held' instead of baffling with numbers

If there was any truth in it then people couldn't retire or leave the NHS
One of the cornerstones of the NHS pension, is the assumption that more people will be working for the NHS, than those retired from it. The reverse is now true, so the pension is failing. On top of that, those on final salary schemes, if you look at the 'supposed' contributions both the employee and state, and the expected return when retired, the growth on the invested money cannot any longer be achieved, so it is failing again.
If the pension were to fail completely, neither the financial markets or the government can cover the deficit. This happened in Greece, many ex-government employees now receive less than 50% of what they expect, those still employed will get less than that.

Unless the economy starts growing at an extraordinary rate, the NHS pension will fail at some point.
 
#11
Many things annoy me about the NHS, such as, by its very existence, it promotes unhealthy lifestyles; that discretionary (lifestyle) treatments seem to have become a human right (boob jobs, gastric bands, gender reassignments, IVF etc); that every leaflet & poster is in about 5 different languages; that migrants whether illegal or otherwise are able to walk in off the street for gold plated treatment etc.
Fat cats pay & pensions, however, isn't one of the irritants for me.
 
#12
What got me about the NHS when I was contracting there wasn't particularly the salaries or pensions of the senior non-clinical management. After all, good people needed to be attracted to the role.

However I question whether the people in the senior posts were the best people. One example that sticks in the mind was a Director who was the only one at that level in the building a couple of days before Christmas with authority t sign something I needed to be dealt with there and then as, with typical NHS planning skills it was the last day for a BACS run or someone wouldn't get paid before the New Year.

Said Director was running round the office with her head in her hands announcing to all and sundry, "I'm in a tizzy, such a tizzy. I can;t think, I'm in such a tizzy". This did not inspire confidence - how much better to have gone into her office, asked her PA to bring a coffee or glass of water, taken a deep breath & composed herself, then come out ready to face the world. I've seen very young LCpls show more leadership.

The other thing that got up my nose was that to go with the Director status they then needed a Business Manager and PA, official car and all sorts of other perks to show how important they were. Add to that he merry-go-round of being able to take early retirement on a pension on a Friday, then come back into work the following Monday as a consultant in the same role & it's easy to see where the money actually goes...
this has become a problem in the fire service as well,massive pay out then return days later,whilst cutting the budgets on the sharp end of the service
 
#13
this has become a problem in the fire service as well,massive pay out then return days later,whilst cutting the budgets on the sharp end of the service
Our last Chief Fire Officer "Retired" last month. He gets his pension and six months off, he's back on a reduced wage doing the same job in October/November.
His wages were around £140k. His lump sum probably around £500k.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
#14
Our last Chief Fire Officer "Retired" last month. He gets his pension and six months off, he's back on a reduced wage doing the same job in October/November.
His wages were around £140k. His lump sum probably around £500k.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
Whereas those with a few decades in the military look forward to a life smelling of wee as a Chelsea Pensioner? Come on, we have had one of the best pensions about...£112K lump sum and a £36K pension for 27 years' service? Yep, pretty poor, that's what I say.
 
#16
Whereas those with a few decades in the military look forward to a life smelling of wee as a Chelsea Pensioner? Come on, we have had one of the best pensions about...£112K lump sum and a £36K pension for 27 years' service? Yep, pretty poor, that's what I say.
assuming you live to 80 the pension pot for a lt col / col is worth well in excess of a £1m - for a 34 yr career this equates to paying in £2500 a month, every month of service....nice work if you can get....
 
#17
Whereas those with a few decades in the military look forward to a life smelling of wee as a Chelsea Pensioner? Come on, we have had one of the best pensions about...£112K lump sum and a £36K pension for 27 years' service? Yep, pretty poor, that's what I say.
Oh don't get me wrong. He paid, probably around 15% for it.

It's the re employment probably on around £70k pa with no pension payments.......


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#19
One of the cornerstones of the NHS pension, is the assumption that more people will be working for the NHS, than those retired from it. The reverse is now true, so the pension is failing. On top of that, those on final salary schemes, if you look at the 'supposed' contributions both the employee and state, and the expected return when retired, the growth on the invested money cannot any longer be achieved, so it is failing again.
If the pension were to fail completely, neither the financial markets or the government can cover the deficit. This happened in Greece, many ex-government employees now receive less than 50% of what they expect, those still employed will get less than that.

Unless the economy starts growing at an extraordinary rate, the NHS pension will fail at some point.
The money isn't invested at all.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top