Public Health Questions...



Clear link but as someone has already alluded to, there appears to be an appetite to dance around the obvious for fear of being haraunged by the LGBTQ+£_#@£# community and talking heads.

I think the LBTGQ community can read between any lines pretty well..
I think it's more to frustrate the mail/express/less savoury outlets from splashing with 'gay plague II horror!' headlines.
As well as being accurate and unbiased as well, reporting the facts. Exactly like HIV, it could affect anyone - and with a much simpler and effective mode of transmission.
 


Clear link but as someone has already alluded to, there appears to be an appetite to dance around the obvious for fear of being haraunged by the LGBTQ+£_#@£# community and talking heads.

I think there's concern that people will dismiss monkeypox as something that won't affect them because they aren't out picking up other men in gay nightclubs.

We know who it has been infecting initially, but there's no reason that it would remain limited to that group. If it breaks out in the general community it can infect anyone and everyone.

Western health specialists are not that familiar with monkeypox, and when a disease arrives in a new environment there is always a risk that it will behave and spread differently than it does in its native environment. There is reason to believe that it has been spreading unnoticed under the radar (possibly by being misdiagnosed as something else in many cases) and so there may be many more cases that we're not aware of. The incubation period can be fairly long so there may be many cases that have yet to display obvious symptoms.

As well as it spreading apparently mainly by direct contact, it also has a respiratory element as well. While it isn't as infectious in this manner as COVID-19, you can catch it from breathing the same air as someone else. How much this will happen in say a packed subway in a major city as opposed to the open air in an African village is something we really don't know.

Nobody is panicking over monkeypox just yet, but there are increasing signs of nervousness over it.
 
The WHO are convening an emergency meeting next week on monkeypox.
World Health Organization holding emergency session next week on monkeypox

They will be discussing whether to classify the monkeypox outbreaks as a "public health emergency of international concern", or PHEIC for short. Currently only COVID-19 and polio fall into that category.

So far there have been 1,600 confirmed cases, 1,500 suspected cases, and 72 deaths from monkeypox this year.

Apparently there are discussions about giving monkeypox a new name, and also about sharing smallpox vaccines. Smallpox vaccine works against monkeypox as the two are related, but supplies are limited.
 
The WHO are convening an emergency meeting next week on monkeypox.
World Health Organization holding emergency session next week on monkeypox

They will be discussing whether to classify the monkeypox outbreaks as a "public health emergency of international concern", or PHEIC for short. Currently only COVID-19 and polio fall into that category.

So far there have been 1,600 confirmed cases, 1,500 suspected cases, and 72 deaths from monkeypox this year.

Apparently there are discussions about giving monkeypox a new name, and also about sharing smallpox vaccines. Smallpox vaccine works against monkeypox as the two are related, but supplies are limited.
Thanks.
It hadn't actually sunk in that people had actually died, (Well, not many)
 
Thanks.
It hadn't actually sunk in that people had actually died, (Well, not many)
Those figures include people in Africa as well as the rest of the world. I think the deaths are mainly from the Congo strain of the virus, which is more deadly than the West Africa strain.

The Congo strain has a 10 per cent fatality rate while the West Africa strain has a 1 per cent fatality rate. However, calculating fatality rates is difficult when you don't have really good public health data, so take these numbers as very rough estimates.

It's the West Africa strain which is currently circulating outside of Africa. There's no reason that I'm aware of however why the Congo strain can't make an appearance abroad either in the same way the West African variant did.
 
Those figures include people in Africa as well as the rest of the world. I think the deaths are mainly from the Congo strain of the virus, which is more deadly than the West Africa strain.

The Congo strain has a 10 per cent fatality rate while the West Africa strain has a 1 per cent fatality rate. However, calculating fatality rates is difficult when you don't have really good public health data, so take these numbers as very rough estimates.

It's the West Africa strain which is currently circulating outside of Africa. There's no reason that I'm aware of however why the Congo strain can't make an appearance abroad either in the same way the West African variant did.
Similar to Ebola 'strains'. Ouch.
Thanks for the update, Much appreciated!
 
This story mentions that the stockpiles of smallpox vaccine which many countries have are old and probably not ideal for use against monkeypox.
What's the monkeypox vaccine and who should get it?

"Some countries have maintained strategic supplies of older smallpox vaccines from the Smallpox Eradication Programme (SEP) which concluded in 1980," said the WHO's interim monkeypox vaccination guidance issued on Tuesday.

"These first-generation vaccines held in national reserves are not recommended for monkeypox at this time, as they do not meet current safety and manufacturing standards."

The vaccine approved for use in Canada is the MVA-BN, or Modified Vaccinia Ankara - Bavarian Nordic. Bavarian Nordic is a Danish company and this vaccine is a newer type. In Canada the vaccine is sold under the trade name Imvamune, in Europe it's known as Imvanex, and in the US it's called Jynneos.

MVA-BN was approved for use against smallpox in 2013, and in 2020 approval was given to use it against monkeypox.

This last bit is something that I found particularly interesting. Apparently in 2020 they were already thinking about needing a vaccine for use against monkeypox, so it sounds like this outbreak did not come out of the blue but rather was something they felt they needed to be prepared for.

Previous stories have said that monkeypox outbreaks have been increasing in size and frequency in Africa over the past decade so its appearance on the world stage now is not entirely unexpected.



Most of the cases of monkeypox in Canada have been in Montreal so far, with 132 in the provide of Quebec in total. In response to this health authorities are vaccinating 25,000 people in what is seen as the highest risk group (I shouldn't have to outline who that is). So far they've done 3,000 jabs.
Quebec expands monkeypox vaccination efforts as virus continues to spread
 
The WHO have decided that monkey pox is not yet a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC).
Meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the multi-country monkeypox outbreak

The WHO Director-General has the pleasure of transmitting the Report of the Meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR) Emergency Committee regarding the multi-country monkeypox outbreak, held on 23 June 2022, from 12:00 to 17:00 Geneva time (CEST). The WHO Director-General concurs with the advice offered by the IHR Emergency Committee regarding the multi-country monkeypox outbreak and, at present, does not determine that the event constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC).

What this means is that they don't see the situation as being serious enough yet to treat it like COVID-19 or a number of other diseases of highest concern (e.g. polio).

This doesn't mean there isn't a problem. It just means the problem hasn't yet escalated to the point of requiring the most serious measures.

Where things go from here will depend on whether the outbreak is brought under control, or if it continues to grow.

This article published on Thursday discusses the pros and cons of escalating monkey pox to the highest category of concern.
WHO considers declaring monkeypox a global health emergency
 
I have also posted this on the Polio in London thread, but thought that it could use exposure here as well, as this thread isn't exclusively about monkey pox.

The following video is worth watching for those who want a good explanation of what the detection of polio in London sewage means. The people in this video area actual virus scientists and so can be trusted to know what they're talking about. The relevant part is from 6:22 to 22:00. The video should start at the beginning of the relevant conversation.

If you want the short version, there are two main types of polio vaccine in the world. There is an oral vaccine and an injectable vaccine. The UK used to use the oral vaccine but currently only uses the injectable vaccine. The oral vaccine is still given in many parts of the world because it is easy to administer.

The oral vaccine is an attenuated virus. It will revert to an active form after being in your gut for a while. People who have had a recent oral vaccine will shed live and active virus in their feces while they themselves are immune due to the vaccine. This is called a vaccine derived virus. This virus can spread to other people.

If everyone is vaccinated against polio, this isn't a problem. The problem is when there are people who have recently (although "recent" can be a considerable period of time) had the oral vaccine come in contact with people who haven't been vaccinated at all. In certain parts of London vaccination rates of residents has fallen to concerningly low levels.

At present it isn't known if polio is spreading from person to person in London, but there are reasons to suspect that it might be. There is no reason to believe the problem is connected with illegal immigration as opposed to legal residents who haven't been vaccinated coming into contact with legal visitors coming from parts of the world where they use the oral vaccine.

The one and only solution is for everyone in the UK who hasn't had their polio jab to get jabbed.

 
The WHO have said that if the monkey pox outbreak is not brought under control then it could spread into high risk groups such as children, pregnant women, and the immunocompromised.
WHO warns of monkeypox risk to kids, pregnant people if spread continues

The WHO are currently investigating a number of cases in children, including in the UK, Spain, and France.

Monkey pox cases have so far been found in 50 countries outside of the areas in Africa where it is endemic.
 
Covid Admissions drifting up

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No particular trend in deaths at present

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Presumably Vaccine is mitigating severity and treatment options are now better.
 
I think there's concern that people will dismiss monkeypox as something that won't affect them because they aren't out picking up other men in gay nightclubs.

We know who it has been infecting initially, but there's no reason that it would remain limited to that group. If it breaks out in the general community it can infect anyone and everyone.

Western health specialists are not that familiar with monkeypox, and when a disease arrives in a new environment there is always a risk that it will behave and spread differently than it does in its native environment. There is reason to believe that it has been spreading unnoticed under the radar (possibly by being misdiagnosed as something else in many cases) and so there may be many more cases that we're not aware of. The incubation period can be fairly long so there may be many cases that have yet to display obvious symptoms.

As well as it spreading apparently mainly by direct contact, it also has a respiratory element as well. While it isn't as infectious in this manner as COVID-19, you can catch it from breathing the same air as someone else. How much this will happen in say a packed subway in a major city as opposed to the open air in an African village is something we really don't know.

Nobody is panicking over monkeypox just yet, but there are increasing signs of nervousness over it.
This weekend being touted as the next major spreader scenario.

Dan, who caught monkeypox at the start of June, wants more people to be aware of the virus.
"I never thought it would be something that I would get," he told BBC journalist Nick Raikes.



Oddly there is no mention of abstinence, just stay at home for 21 days once you have been up somebody's rectal passage and have the need to scratch.

No wonder doctors are leaving the profession.
 
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The WHO are concerned about the spread of monkeypox as cases top 6,000 in 58 countries. However, there may be far more cases which are going undetected due to limited testing.

WHO chief 'concerned' about spread of monkeypox

Europe is the current epicentre of the outbreak, with 80 per cent of known cases.

The WHO emergency committee will be reconvened to review the situation.



Ontario Canada is reporting 101 cases of monkeypox, 3 times as many as the week before. Most of the cases are in Toronto.

Ontario reports 101 confirmed monkeypox cases across province



I should add to the above stories that there may be a good deal more monkeypox in various parts of the world than is being reported due to limited testing. The disease is unfamiliar to many doctors who may be diagnosing many mild or early stage cases as something else.

This means that countries that are reporting more cases may simply be better at diagnosing and reporting it than countries which are reporting fewer cases.
 
The province of Ontario in Canada reports that monkeypox is expected to continue to be around for many months due to the long incubation period. However, the vaccination strategy appears to be successful in helping to get tine outbreak there under control.
Monkeypox likely to be around for 'many months' but vaccine strategy working: Ontario's top doctor

Ontario is not seeing rapid growth in cases of monkeypox and its vaccination strategy appears to be working, the province's top doctor says.

Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Kieran Moore said monkeypox will likely be around for "many, many months" due to its lengthy incubation period of up to 21 days, but Ontario isn't seeing exponential growth of the virus.

"At present the numbers (of cases) are not escalating rapidly, but they are increasing," Moore said in a recent interview. "We do think it's stabilizing in Ontario, in terms of not rapid growth."

Moore said 133 cases had been identified in Ontario as of July 6, with the vast majority being in Toronto and most others with a connection to the city. Public Health Ontario had reported 33 cases two weeks earlier.
 
The WHO have declared monkeypox to be a global emergency.
WHO chief declares expanding monkeypox outbreak a global emergency

"We have an outbreak that has spread around the world rapidly through new modes of transmission about which we understand too little and which meets the criteria in the international health regulations," Tedros said.

"I know this has not been an easy or straightforward process and that there are divergent views among the members" of the committee.

Apparently this decision has been made to help ensure that all countries take the situation seriously.

WHO's emergencies chief, Dr. Michael Ryan, said the director general made the decision to put monkeypox in that category to ensure the global community takes the current outbreaks seriously.

Calling something an "emergency" means that it is an "extraordinary event" and requires a coordinated global response.

According to the WHO's top monkeypox expert, 98 per cent of all cases outside Africa were were with "men who have sex with men".

"Although I am declaring a public health emergency of international concern for the moment, this is an outbreak that is concentrated among men who have sex with men, especially those with multiple sexual partners," Tedros said. "That means that this is an outbreak that can be stopped with the right strategies in the right groups."

According to the WHO head, this means that the outbreak can be stopped if we move now with the right strategies. I get the impression that if we wait until it starts to spread among the more general community it will be much harder to stop.



This story is about Canada, but probably applies to most other countries.
Limited vaccine supply could thwart Canada's efforts to contain monkeypox

Vaccine supplies are limited. As a result some health authorities are giving people one jab instead of two to stretch out the supply. One jab apparently gives pretty good protection. Tens of thousands of people have been jabbed so far.

The people getting one jab are "men who have sex with men" who are in good health and who have some contact with confirmed cases.

Health care workers who may come in contact with monkeypox are being given two jabs.

More vaccine is on order from the manufacturer (Bavarian Nordic), but it may not arrive until next year.

The story quotes a pair of public health experts in the US who say that between 2.4 and 5.3 million doses will be required world wide to cover the global population of "men who have sex with men".

It's not clear what the plan is if the infection spreads into the general community.
 
Sweaty Jim is apparently a monkeypox spreader, no other clue/identikit though.


also known as 'slutty Jim' according to the author, his partner must be thrilled.

Keep them peeled !
 
Some clues have emerged as to the cause of the new hepatitis disease which has been affecting children around the world.
Viral infections, genetic factors may be linked to mystery hepatitis in kids, studies suggest

For those who may not recall, there has been an outbreak of hepatitis (liver disease) affecting mainly children in a number of countries, including the UK. This has been causing serious illness, with some children requiring liver transplants. There have also been roughly 2 dozen deaths as well.

Initial analysis seemed to show a connection between this new hepatitis and adenovirus 41.

Recent preprint (not fully reviewed) research papers from teams in London and Glasgow suggest that adenovirus 41may be operating in conjunction with another virus known as AAV2, plus genetic susceptibility to cause the disease.

Eight out of nine of the cases studied in Scotland had a gene known as DRB1-0401, but only 15.6 per cent of the population as a whole have this same gene.

Normally the AAV2 virus does not cause any noticeable symptoms and large numbers of people can be infected with it without noticing any symptoms.

However, there has been a surge in adenovirus 41 infections during the past winter and spring which has coincided with the new hepatitis outbreak.

So far this connection between the three possible causes (the two viruses and the gene) is not proven, but there is enough evidence to show that larger and more detailed studies are required.

There have always been unexplained cases of hepatitis in children and it is possible that this is not actually a new disease, but rather one we are only finding now because any mysterious phenomenon is being looked at more closely.

None the less it warrants more study.
 
The US have declared monkeypox to be a public health emergency.
U.S. declares monkeypox a public health emergency

This is apparently an administrative move which releases funds to pay for dealing with the monkeypox outbreak in the US.

The US has so far reported 6,600 cases.



In Canada, Ontario has reported 423 confirmed cases so far, most in Toronto, and all but 2 cases in mail patients. Eleven people have been hospitalized and 2 are in ICU.
Ontario monkeypox cases rise to 423: Public Health Ontario



Foreigners, particularly from the US, are coming to Canada to get monkeypox jabs.
Foreigners seeking monkeypox vaccine in Canada

The news story has a video in which several Americans said getting a monkeypox jab was difficult in the US but comparatively easy in Canada.
 

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