PTSD

Seems those old bold BBC reporters are now whining as they suffer from PTSD . This morning there was a report about one of their own Fergal Keane is standing down as he is suffering from PTSD.

Another reporter on BBCRadio 4 this morning mentioned the terrible times he had , as he had to go to report on conflicts for a few weeks , so he was away from his family.

Poor lamb, must have been terrible in the 5 star hotel with a driver, body guard and translator.
What next ?
 
Why are you dissing people having PTSD if they haven't lived in a FOB or hole in the ground.

Is it that only bally Mil heroes can suffer?

Your ignorance is eye-watering
 
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Seems those old bold BBC reporters are now whining as they suffer from PTSD . This morning there was a report about one of their own Fergal Keane is standing down as he is suffering from PTSD.

Another reporter on BBCRadio 4 this morning mentioned the terrible times he had , as he had to go to report on conflicts for a few weeks , so he was away from his family.

Poor lamb, must have been terrible in the 5 star hotel with a driver, body guard and translator.
What next ?
Amongst other things he covered the genocide in Rwanda. Rather him than me.

What have you done?
 

philc

LE
Intresting article in last weekend Times, ambulance driver with PTSD, stuff he had seen etc over the years, horrifying. He has written a book about it.
 
Intresting article in last weekend Times, ambulance driver with PTSD, stuff he had seen etc over the years, horrifying. He has written a book about it.
My dad drove ambulances. One of his first call-outs was to a motorcyclist who had his skull smashed open. He came home to a tea of macaroni cheese, which he didn't eat then, and has never had since.
 
Ex girl friends dad , worked as a ambulance driver , first job was picking up a chap who fell down the stairs.

As he said


“ bit of a struggle , I had to pick up his head , as I did my fingers went into his brain as his skull was smashed in “

Never had a problem with it.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Two female Radio Ops in a rover group ambushed near Middletown NI 1975,
One female Radio Op was killed instantly by a severe head wound. The other uninjured Female Radio Op nursed the dead girl for two miles before meeting another mobile patrol, until then she had maintained radio contact. Her mental problems didn't start for some weeks, when she would sit crying silently. She had nursed the dead girl holding her by the head, and had felt the wound, and would keep asking of us all 'where was she wounded'? we used to say 'a body wound' a large problem for this excellent girl was that she could not go minutes without constantly washing her hands, because of the blood that had caked on her fingers. Months later she was awarded a well deserved MBE, however her problems were still growing, I just wonder how the poor little girl is now, she was hardly five foot. A funny thing PTSD.
 
Mrs dun_n_dusted has complex PTSD and has never served on Ops, but then again she is married to me* :)





*Actually genuinely does have complex PTSD and has been assessed as such. Many traumatic things in her life has led to this state.
 
Is there such a thing as uncomplicated PTSD?
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Ex girl friends dad , worked as a ambulance driver , first job was picking up a chap who fell down the stairs.

As he said


“ bit of a struggle , I had to pick up his head , as I did my fingers went into his brain as his skull was smashed in “

Never had a problem with it.

This is not a competition.
 
I know many of these villains, and I'd bet a month's wages on their cadre sheltering a case of PTSD or two...........

1579978492677.png


And, guess what, not many of them have lived in a FOB.......................
 
This is not a competition.
Everything is a competition.

The lack of mac in my dad's diet was the only lasting effect of that incident. He attended many railway deaths where the patients were generally retrieved with the aid of a shovel and bin bags. These had no lasting effect either. Being held hostage at gunpoint by a nutter who had previously stabbed a copper in the chest, however, did.

Scores on the doors please @StBob072
 

Yokel

LE
Complex PTSD used to be excluded from DSM-IV and suffers did not get the help they needed. People are damaged by successive traumas - none of this 'what does not kill me makes me stronger'. Just as you ability to cope with trauma and stress is reduced by having other stresses to deal with things, trauma after trauma builds up.
 
Seems those old bold BBC reporters are now whining as they suffer from PTSD . This morning there was a report about one of their own Fergal Keane is standing down as he is suffering from PTSD.

Another reporter on BBCRadio 4 this morning mentioned the terrible times he had , as he had to go to report on conflicts for a few weeks , so he was away from his family.

Poor lamb, must have been terrible in the 5 star hotel with a driver, body guard and translator.
What next ?
The other reporter you refer to is Jeremy Bowen who, amongst other things saw his Lebanese colleague crawl on fire from his car that had been hit by an Israeli shell, and as Jeremy went to assist his dying friend, he was shot at by machine guns. Bloody liberal snowflake, eh?

Stop being a never-served complete cøck.
 
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BaldBaBoon

War Hero
One area that is going to be a huge problem with PTSD in the future is with the personnel from the emergency services, in my opinion.

I have done a fair few tours as a sapper and the delights of the initial UN tours to FRY were not especially pleasant and various overseas work I did afterwards was a bit gut wrenching as well.

But since joining the police I have experienced and seen stuff that really is in a whole new category of hideous, and done things as a PC that I used to think would have been the remit of specialist recovery teams. I can whole heartily say that checking bodies found floating in the Thames ( floating for quite some time ), forcing entry into a house and discovering someone literally melted/rotted into a sofa after being dead for months, discovering children hanging or recovering pieces of a human that has exploded after being hit by a high speed train ( my newer job ) and been spread over 300 metres......and then having to retrace your steps looking for a unborn child that the pregnant women was carrying is a tad challenging at the best of times.

However, this is not the best of times and my mates at work are absolutely run ragged and have a never ending amount of work constantly being added to them. The paperwork loaded onto them is the kind of stuff that could get you sacked if you make a mistake and the demands and criticisms for not doing the paperwork are severe....no excuse is allowed for not completing a workload requirement even if you have been trying to locate the missing pieces of a schoolchild that jumped in front of a train that day.

My mates are fraying at the seams, mentally and physically exhausted, demoralized, massively under-strength and I worry about them. Medical service personal report burnout of their staff to the same degree.
 
One area that is going to be a huge problem with PTSD in the future is with the personnel from the emergency services, in my opinion.

I have done a fair few tours as a sapper and the delights of the initial UN tours to FRY were not especially pleasant and various overseas work I did afterwards was a bit gut wrenching as well.

But since joining the police I have experienced and seen stuff that really is in a whole new category of hideous, and done things as a PC that I used to think would have been the remit of specialist recovery teams. I can whole heartily say that checking bodies found floating in the Thames ( floating for quite some time ), forcing entry into a house and discovering someone literally melted/rotted into a sofa after being dead for months, discovering children hanging or recovering pieces of a human that has exploded after being hit by a high speed train ( my newer job ) and been spread over 300 metres......and then having to retrace your steps looking for a unborn child that the pregnant women was carrying is a tad challenging at the best of times.

However, this is not the best of times and my mates at work are absolutely run ragged and have a never ending amount of work constantly being added to them. The paperwork loaded onto them is the kind of stuff that could get you sacked if you make a mistake and the demands and criticisms for not doing the paperwork are severe....no excuse is allowed for not completing a workload requirement even if you have been trying to locate the missing pieces of a schoolchild that jumped in front of a train that day.

My mates are fraying at the seams, mentally and physically exhausted, demoralized, massively under-strength and I worry about them. Medical service personal report burnout of their staff to the same degree.
Truly shocking, no wonder instances of sick leave are so high.
 
Seems those old bold BBC reporters are now whining as they suffer from PTSD . This morning there was a report about one of their own Fergal Keane is standing down as he is suffering from PTSD.

Another reporter on BBCRadio 4 this morning mentioned the terrible times he had , as he had to go to report on conflicts for a few weeks , so he was away from his family.

Poor lamb, must have been terrible in the 5 star hotel with a driver, body guard and translator.
What next ?

Hmmmmmmmm.

I'm guessing that you haven't been in a trauma/conflict environment with comments like that.

Believe it or not, apart from incidents like Dingrr's Zebedee impression, conflict coverage can often be worse for the journalist than the soldiers.

Firstly, they are unarmed, so the only thing they can shoot back with is a camera.

Secondly, unlike soldiers, they get to relive it again in the editing suite. That may not sound like an awful lot, but from the few riots I've covered one of the first things that occurs to you is :" Jesus, what the bloody hell was I doing there?"

I'd recommend reading The Bang Bang club as research material.

Either that or go and listen to one of John Simpson's lectures on his experience of being blown up by the Yanks in GWII.

He doesn't have PTSD (not). He is just very, very, very fcuking angry.

Oh, and you appear to be a bit of a tool.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer

One wonders if he's ever heard of Kate Adie, or Marie Colvin.

Not necessarily in terms of PTSD, but in terms of what reporters of integrity actually do!
 

Great Guy, photographed me for the GQ interview. He still goes out to conflict zones, uses wet film, giving him an advantage over other photographers.
 

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