PTSD Counselling

#1
Probably not the most appropriate forum for this question but it was the only one I can find.

I'm trying to find appropriate PTSD counselling for my nephew, heres the scenario.

A couple of weeks ago my father died, I was away at the time and my nephew was the first one on the scene, having heamoraged from a tumour in his throat dad sadly essentially bled to death, with my nephew manfully attempting CPR while kneeling in most of his blood.

Nephew is subsequently not sleeping and having flashbacks, he seems to think he has to man up as all his uncles were soldiers (yeah I know) I have attempted to talk to him about it but he seems a little reticent (I can't blame him to be honest), He also has a fair degree of guilt .

Am I barking up the wrong tree to be thinking of trying to get him some counselling for PTSD and if I'm not then I'd greatly appreciate some advice because I've run out

Zippy483
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#5
It's going to be pretty normal for him to go through this don't rush into medicalising this. Spend time with him keep him busy and involve others if it seems abnormal. Did you thank him for what he did and say you really appreciated it? Reassure him he couldn't have done anymore or saved him.
 
#6
It's going to be pretty normal for him to go through this don't rush into medicalising this. Spend time with him keep him busy and involve others if it seems abnormal. Did you thank him for what he did and say you really appreciated it? Reassure him he couldn't have done anymore or saved him.
Yeah did thank him, did explain that there was nothing he could have done more, the ambulance crew were really supportive of him at the time apparently and said he'd done all and more than he could have
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#7
Yeah did thank him, did explain that there was nothing he could have done more, the ambulance crew were really supportive of him at the time apparently and said he'd done all and more than he could have
Sounds like you've done the right things. Give him something to remember him allow him to get angry if he needs to. I've no idea how old he is but remind him alcohol is not a solution. Encourage diversional activities such as exercise.
 
#8
Sounds like you've done the right things. Give him something to remember him allow him to get angry if he needs to. I've no idea how old he is but remind him alcohol is not a solution. Encourage diversional activities such as exercise.

He's only 19, but was brought up by my dad so was more like his own dad really, He isn't a big drinker to be fair always been really responsible, and he could do with a bit of phys lol
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#9
He's only 19, but was brought up by my dad so was more like his own dad really, He isn't a big drinker to be fair always been really responsible, and he could do with a bit of phys lol
Only get stuff on his medical records if needed. Voluntary agencies can be of use. It's probably his first big bereavement you could look at Elizabeth kubler Ross and google on death and dying or dabda I'm sure you'll get something useful. Hope he works through.
 
#11
Probably not the most appropriate forum for this question but it was the only one I can find.

I'm trying to find appropriate PTSD counselling for my nephew, heres the scenario.

A couple of weeks ago my father died, I was away at the time and my nephew was the first one on the scene, having heamoraged from a tumour in his throat dad sadly essentially bled to death, with my nephew manfully attempting CPR while kneeling in most of his blood.

Nephew is subsequently not sleeping and having flashbacks, he seems to think he has to man up as all his uncles were soldiers (yeah I know) I have attempted to talk to him about it but he seems a little reticent (I can't blame him to be honest), He also has a fair degree of guilt .

Am I barking up the wrong tree to be thinking of trying to get him some counselling for PTSD and if I'm not then I'd greatly appreciate some advice because I've run out

Zippy483[/QUOTE

You should see a Human Givens trained therapist - they will be able to clear PTSD. Traditional talking therapy will not help.
 
#12
Probably not the most appropriate forum for this question but it was the only one I can find.

I'm trying to find appropriate PTSD counselling for my nephew, heres the scenario.

A couple of weeks ago my father died, I was away at the time and my nephew was the first one on the scene, having heamoraged from a tumour in his throat dad sadly essentially bled to death, with my nephew manfully attempting CPR while kneeling in most of his blood.

Nephew is subsequently not sleeping and having flashbacks, he seems to think he has to man up as all his uncles were soldiers (yeah I know) I have attempted to talk to him about it but he seems a little reticent (I can't blame him to be honest), He also has a fair degree of guilt .

Am I barking up the wrong tree to be thinking of trying to get him some counselling for PTSD and if I'm not then I'd greatly appreciate some advice because I've run out

Zippy483
You should see a Human Givens trained therapist - they will be able to clear PTSD. Traditional talking therapy will not help.
clear PTSD???? stop talking out your rear end!! I have not met anyone who has been cleared of PTSD, I have met people who are in more control of it, but not anyone who has been "cleared" statements like that are dangerous.
you want help? 1st stop is your GP, not a website IMHO, we could be anyone giving advice and if it's wrong, it can be very tragic, no matter what qualifications or experience anyone claims on here unless you know them, it's best not to trust any medical advice.
 
#13
clear PTSD???? stop talking out your rear end!! I have not met anyone who has been cleared of PTSD, I have met people who are in more control of it, but not anyone who has been "cleared" statements like that are dangerous.
you want help? 1st stop is your GP, not a website IMHO, we could be anyone giving advice and if it's wrong, it can be very tragic, no matter what qualifications or experience anyone claims on here unless you know them, it's best not to trust any medical advice.
Completely agree about 1st stop GP just wanted a pointer to a few charities maybe so that I could be a little better informed of what He's going through, talking the little bugger into going to the GP will be an entirely different kettle of fish

Thanks for your help chaps some of the websites and links from them have been very helpful

now its just a matter of easing the lad in the right direction
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#14
clear PTSD???? stop talking out your rear end!! I have not met anyone who has been cleared of PTSD, I have met people who are in more control of it, but not anyone who has been "cleared" statements like that are dangerous.
you want help? 1st stop is your GP, not a website IMHO, we could be anyone giving advice and if it's wrong, it can be very tragic, no matter what qualifications or experience anyone claims on here unless you know them, it's best not to trust any medical advice.
We've already proven the human givens to be the walts of psychosocial interventions. Not one scrap of evidence.
 
#15
Doing a bit of reading up is also a cost and time effective way of dealing with things. Books vary, but I've always found the "Overcoming" series to be quite good:

Overcoming Traumatic Stress: A Self-help Guide Using Cognitive Behavioural Techniques: Amazon.co.uk: Claudia Herbert, Ann Wetmore: Books

GPs vary. You might want to go straight to a specialised clinical psychologist or psychiatrist. Local community mental health teams can help in this respect. NHS waiting lists can be a bit long so it might be worth forking out for private healthcare sooner rather than later.

Time is a big healer. Give him time and space, but also try to keep him from being too insular and stuck in a downward spiral. Don't get bogged down with labels and diagnoses; so many stress/anxiety/depression problems are similar to eachother that putting labels and categorising everything isn't always helpful.

It sounds like a really brave thing he did. I hope you and the rest of his family are proud of him.
 
#16
Cruse is committed to breaking the stigma around grief and ensuring that everyone, no matter how old or young, can access the highest quality support following a bereavement.
0844 4779400
Call and see if they have a centre near you.
 
#17
Long time listener, first time caller because I'm slightly angry. Traditional talking therapy will not help? Of course it will, and does. There are over 400 models of therapy - the ones that work have a great deal in common and there are clinicians using some form of 'talking treatment' across the world, with decades of research into their results. If you read the research - and it's easily accessible on line or in mainstream psychotherapy books - you will see countless examples, over many years, in many countries, of trauma being successfully treated. How do you think your model of therapy derived their treatment in the first place? Don't tout one form of treatment over another just because that's what you trained in. The service user accessing treatment has a choice you know, and their choice matters enormously (recent BMJ article verifies healing effects of patient choice). You may love your therapeutic model but for goodness sake let the service user decide. I agree with the other posts: apply common sense and don't unnecessarily medicalise something. Countless people never resort to professional help because they have supportive families, good friends, and are given the time to deal with life events in the way they need to.
 
#18
canteen_cowboy is bang on the nail IMHO. Don't mess with people's heads. Some of us work it out for ourselves and learn the coping skills, talking therapy might work but it's (in my ham fisted vernacular) like stirring up a fish tank, lots of crap floating about for a long time. Professionals, learned and competent practitioners, might try asking sufferers how best they can , as individuals, be supported. PTSD sufferers should not be guinea pigs.
 
#19
[/QUOTE

You should see a Human Givens trained therapist - they will be able to clear PTSD. Traditional talking therapy will not help.
No, we've had this discussion before - it's bollox. Potentially dangerous bollox. I say this because the only research supporting this potentially dangerous bollox is published in a magazine printed in house by the Human Givens Foundation.


Really stay away from anybody advertising their services in this stuff - it's dangerous bollox.

Edit - when I googled Kis Counselling, I found a website of the same name belonging to somebody who "practices" this stuff.

If you and the website owner are one and the same, don't you think it's a bit shameful to seek out potentially vulnerable people, akin to a vulture, to tell them the therapy your practice is able to "clear PTSD" when there is absolutely no scientific evidence to support this claim?
 

jim24

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
clear PTSD???? stop talking out your rear end!! I have not met anyone who has been cleared of PTSD, I have met people who are in more control of it, but not anyone who has been "cleared" statements like that are dangerous.
you want help? 1st stop is your GP, not a website IMHO, we could be anyone giving advice and if it's wrong, it can be very tragic, no matter what qualifications or experience anyone claims on here unless you know them, it's best not to trust any medical advice.
I couldn't agree more,The poor kids grief stricken, you want to give him some time before getting shrinks involved
 

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