PTSD and homeless ex-servicemen

#1
Next weekend a group of former servicemen (myself included) will conduct a sleep out on the Victoria embankment to raise awareness of the number of ex-servicemen who find themselves out on the streets.

Many of these guys have problems coping with life after the forces and a large number suffer with PTSD. Please take a look at the folowing link for more info.

http://www.2para.co.uk/

This post is not intended to start a thread on the whys and wherefors of PTSD or how these guys ended up sleeping rough. If you can make it on the day all the better.

I've put this post in the current affairs as its one of the forums with the most hits, can I ask the Mod's to leave it here..........cheers
 
E

ex-dvr

Guest
#2
A very good cause guys and girls

All the best hope you raise lots of money for them
 
#3
A very important cause which deserves significantly more attention, particularly so close to Remembrance day.

I wish you every success.

Hope someone has invited some politicians - some of them need a reality check!
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#4
I read the percentage of those sleeping rough on our city streets, that are ex servicemen, is over over 25%. Not sure if it is in fact higher.
 
#5
A very good cause, and it's now a sticky.

......Or it will be :D
 
#7
An really excellent cause.

Just a comment - but it would really help if ex servicemen on the streets could show a Regimental badge or something similar. I for one, and know many others would dig deep to help a fellow serviceman.

Do use the ABF to help out - this is what they are there for.
 
#8
Ramillies

I know what you mean but there are plenty of 'beggers' who would soon cotton on and blag money by displaying a Regt badge, also alot of the ex-forces guys are ashamed of living rough and would not want to be seen to be using their unit as a way of getting money.

Thanks for the posts of support BTW
 
#10
Eggbanjo said:
Next weekend a group of former servicemen (myself included) will conduct a sleep out on the Victoria embankment to raise awareness of the number of ex-servicemen who find themselves out on the streets.

Many of these guys have problems coping with life after the forces and a large number suffer with PTSD. Please take a look at the folowing link for more info.

http://www.2para.co.uk/

This post is not intended to start a thread on the whys and wherefors of PTSD or how these guys ended up sleeping rough. If you can make it on the day all the better.

I've put this post in the current affairs as its one of the forums with the most hits, can I ask the Mod's to leave it here..........cheers

My dad spent 22 years of his life in the army and only Lasted 5 years in civvy street. he just couldnt handle getting use to the fact that its a whole diffo world............ the army really should do more to help the people who risk their lives everyday and of course try to keep this a good place to live ........... well if you got rid of the government that is :roll:
 
#11
EggBanjo

What have you done about PR for the event?

Have you anything organised?

Do you need more?

PM me, if you feel you could use some

PTP
 
#12
Very well done , bringing this to light was commendable ,how soon we forget.
 
#13
Update for those that are interested.

15 or so people turned out on the day, low numbers possibly, but the point was made so mission accomplished. I understand Sky News mentioned it several times during the day, so if it raised the profile a tad all the better.

Like the majority of people I tend to look the other way when you see homeless people (whether ex-forces or not), avoid eye contact at all costs. So it was quite a humbling experiance to talk to some of them. OK some of them choose to be there others are forced for whatever reasons to live rough, but having spent one night out on the streets I will view them in a different light. The real eyeopener for me was how young these kids are, some did not look much older than my 14 year old son and had lived rough for sometime.

Strange country we live in.
 
#14
Well done on the sleep out,hopefully seeing you guys in the street will have made some passers by stop and think.
Couldn't believe how small the turnout was(would've been there myself but for being in Cyprus),maybe you could've got more attention to the event by advertising it a bit i.e:national press or regimental journals and magazines,i'm sure they wouldn't have charged for it.
Something to consider for the future if indeed there were a repeat of the event?

Once again well done,you've brought to light a subject that lives very much in the shadow of other issues-unfortunately just like the people it effects.
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#15
Ministers have clearly been briefed that this sort of thing is not an issues in the services. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2087-923016,00.html Another quick PFI opportunity sneaks in under the radar.

Embedded community psychiatric practitioners in the army, it will never work!!! Early detection, and management of stress in the workplace?
If they really need it , I'm sure those top guys at Upavon could knock out a quick CD based training package for section commanders. It would give them something to one evening during junior Brecon!!

Come to think of it why don't we just get Sandline in, just look at those pension savings we could make as well.

( It would certainly help buy us a lot more digitisation boys.
Network centric, thats the way to go!!)
 
#16
The plight of the homeless servicemen is indeed tragic. I'm not sure that all homeless persons (especially the younger ones) are so deserving as I seriously believe that many of them do not actually need to be on the streets. How many parents would actually kick their kids out of the house? Not many I am sure. There may be a number who feel that they cannot stay with their parents for whatever reason but there must be other places they can go i.e. friends or relatives. What I am saying is that a lot are probably there of their own accord. I may seem to be an unsympathetic, heartless robot but that is what I believe.

However, the servicemen are a different kettle of fish. Having servrd their country they then find themselves abandoned by the state and end up in that sorry position. If only our illustrious Government would take a leaf out of the American's book and treat our ex servicemen with as much pride and dignity instead of washing their hands of them at the first opportunity.
 
#17
having worked with the homeless I'd argue most of the young people are on the street because they left home because life was unbearable at home or they were not wanted at home or wanted way too much i.e. abuse really nasty stuff. Dealt with loads of ex servicemen often with drink and or drug problems as well. Some were long service others were care leavers joined because of the chance of a bed couldn't hack it and ended up on the street.
I'd argue one someones ended up on the street there's neither desreving or undesreving cases they all need help ASAP
what would help would be more rehabs pretty pointless nicking drunks and junkies for theiving either fining them or jailing them for short sentances then putting them out on the street to cause more trouble before there nicked again. Its also pointless getting angry with them as there usually so off there face they don't remember what they did when there sober.
case in point ex para attacked me when i was working at a hostel because I quote for being a gay bastard kind of funny because I'm not :roll:. Anyway dragged off by residents and police after 5 minutes of rolling around. year later gets a 50 quid fine been arrested a dozen times more for theiving from off licences etc etc still drunk still maurding around the place.
Funny enough quite a nice bloke when sober
 
#18
this has been discussed on other threads and i feel this is not the one to bring it up on..Eggbanjo should be proud of what he and his colleagues done..if nothing else is achieved, except awareness some of the job has been done..
 
#19
I wish you guys the best of luck. :roll:

Fact: the Army needs young, fit men who are willing to spend extended time away from home, engage in physical combat and kill when so directed; the vast majority of these must be other ranks. There are many advantages to a service career but, only after enlistment, do soldiers start to learn something of the disadvantages; training that is unlikely to be recognised by a civilian employer, consequent limited second career opportunities, manning control points, repeated separation from wife & children, uncertainty over entitlements to pay, pension and allowances, and their enforced redundancy at 40. We have no service `Bill of Rights` just an assortment of Regulations that are subject to change - can anyone say we know where to get accurate, reputable advice to follow or provide to others ?

As an infanteer I have seen lots of young soldiers leave the Army without any clue what they were going to do next - where they were going to live, what cash they could expect to receive on discharge and where to go for advice. Of these the most distressing are those departing on medical discharges (including PTSD) and especially those with young families who have no idea where their future lies - the civilian Medical Board deciding the level of their pension sits AFTER they have left. Most have joined the Army straight from school, or after Job experience schemes, many had broken family backgrounds and had limited job opportunities. Are they well served during their service ? Well, we need the numbers you see until they are 28 or so, after that, we need new blood so the financial carrots cease and they can go, or be pushed out because they haven`t made the required rank. They will have spent most of the previous 10 years on operations with no opportunity for any education/training and many do not get the chance even to complete their leave or resettlement training (which is of limited use anyway) because they couldn’t be spared and our system does not encourage them to speak up. OCs, Platoon Commanders, and ever-zealous CSMs don’t know what their men are entitled to either – or are more interested in playing the numbers game for our duties and commitments.

The Army continues to provide Families Officers to sort out houses, Pay staff to sort out debts, Padres, WRVS, SSAFA etc, etc ....we do our personnel no favours by doing `the thinking for them’ rather than developing and preparing them for the harsh realities of the civilian life that many of them joined the Army to escape. Can it really make sense in any other employment to throw our highly trained staff on the scrapheap at 40 with virtually no option of a full career ?

We need to copy the American system; they value and develop their soldiers throughout their service and provide an extensive network of civilian employers who identify and recruit from specific service skill sets. Incidentally they also provide excellent support to their veterans in retirement – ex-service Brits can’t even go into a NAAFI or YMCA to buy a newspaper ! This level of support costs money but, if we must play world policeman along with the American’s, then we need to get those many nations hiding behind us, happy to fill their fuel tanks cheaply while we protect the oilfields, to put their hands into their pocket to fund it.

Over to you Mr H, it`s a vote winner.
 
G

goneandgone

Guest
#20
agoodgrouping ..What an excellent post 8)
We can only hope people have ears to hear it.

Well done to the lads who went on the sleep out :D
If you want any help with organising publicity etc for any
further events pm me :wink:
 

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