Psychology Project Participants Request

I've read the OPs post a few times, and I don't see anything mentioning that she expects these things to be higher in military populations; to me it looks like she's seeing if the pathway towards risk taking behaviour can be predicted by a number of variables, including military service.

Also its an undergrad project, so needs to be nowhere near as sophisticated as your mention. It's likely they won't need to use anything more complicated than multivariate regression using the measures she is proposing, which knowing how most psych undergraduates are, is probably is enough to fill the OP with dread as it is - lets not try freak her out (or add to the pastoral workload of her tutor!).

OP - good luck with you project. I've not filled it out yet, but I will make the time in the next few days.

Edit: and in addition to here, I trust you have considered the various facebook service groups. To be honest you may get better data in those as usually members are (informally) vetted to ensure they have actually served etc.

Also as I say, I've not filled it in yet, so no idea if you ask this, but you may wish to distinguish between TA/regular soldiers - no idea if its too late to add this question on, or if you have to resubmit ethics.
I hope you’re right. However, for me a ‘pathway’ is predicated on there being a significant difference in variables.

That’s why it’s important that the OP discusses the scope with their tutor.

Lastly, the problem with self-selection bias still remains...
 
I hope you’re right. However, for me a ‘pathway’ is predicated on there being a significant difference in variables.

That’s why it’s important that the OP discusses the scope with their tutor.

Lastly, the problem with self-selection bias still remains...
If there wasn't a lack of rigor over subjective interpretations of the unquantifiable, it wouldn't be psychology.
 
It leaves me pondering what might have changed in society / culture / human beings to make psychological health considerations so radically different from the 1940's.
As a starting point, I will give you '' Nomophobia ''

Then you have the huge plethora of people who have to keep Government funds rolling in justify their existence by creating '' ism's '' and other '' phobia's ''
 
As someone with a PhD in a social science I feel I should point out to you that it would be very dangerous to assume a priori that there is any greater prevalence of these conditions amongst ex-service personnel.

After that documentary ‘RAMBO’ was released, it was assumed by many that this was a serious issue amongst Vietnam Veterans. It turned out that the incidence of suicides (for example) was slightly lower than amongst the same cohort of non-veterans.

You need to get your epidemiology squared away first. So a case-control study might be appropriate. Get a reputable source, such as the Army Medical Services, rather than the Daily Mail. Or here*

Once you’ve established a statistically-significant difference (allowing for random effects and confounding variables) THEN you can go about trying to attribute a causal relationship, though perhaps you’re only likely to identify correlation, and not causality.

This could be a big project, so you might want to have a chat with your tutor to make sure that you don’t go overboard. You’re only trying to pass, not get a Nobel Prize.

* The problem with qualitative surveys on places like here is ‘self selection bias’.**

** and that most of us are cnuts***

***That’s an anagram, not a Viking.
I’m surprised he’s allowed to do primary research at Batchelor level.
 
I’m surprised he’s allowed to do primary research at Batchelor level.
Exactly. The risk is this will go way overboard.

There’s also a potential safeguarding risk of unsupervised undergrads asking insensitive questions of traumatised veterans.

Although, given this is ARRSE, it’s probably the OP who will come off worse.

Maybe by now the supervisor has given them another topic, given the lack of further posts.
 
I hope you’re right. However, for me a ‘pathway’ is predicated on there being a significant difference in variables.

That’s why it’s important that the OP discusses the scope with their tutor.

Lastly, the problem with self-selection bias still remains...

It's an undergraduate project - I'm supervising six of them at the minute - it doesn't have to be a publishable piece of work. In military terms its more likely to be the equivalent of a final exercise at the end of phase one. As for discussing with her tutor, she would have done so, in order to get ethical approval. In fact to get this far, at least two people will have gone over this in depth, and also made methodological suggestions too.

I appreciate you have a PhD and that's great - but it means you are thinking about this far more complicated than it has to be. I can politely say this, because I made the same mistake when I first got given my dissertation students.


And reference the pathway - yes you need a significant difference in variables, and she will have that with the design she has explained here, due to individual differences. She doesn't need to have a non-military comparison population.

The design for this is fine for an undergraduate level project, and there is no safeguarding issue because she has given a number of different places to seek help in her debrief form; not to mention none of the questions go into trauma.
 
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It's an undergraduate project - I'm supervising six of them at the minute - it doesn't have to be a publishable piece of work. In military terms its more likely to be the equivalent of a final exercise at the end of phase one. As for discussing with her tutor, she would have done so, in order to get ethical approval. In fact to get this far, at least two people will have gone over this in depth, and also made methodological suggestions too.

I appreciate you have a PhD and that's great - but it means you are thinking about this far more complicated than it has to be. I can politely say this, because I made the same mistake when I first got given my dissertation students.


And reference the pathway - yes you need a significant difference in variables, and she will have that with the design she has explained here. She doesn't need to have a non-military comparison population.

The design for this is fine for an undergraduate level project, and there is no safeguarding issue because she has given a number of different places to seek help in her debrief form; not to mention none of the questions go into trauma.
Yes and no.

It may differ between courses but for my BA there was, as t’other Bob says, no primary research. It was all done from the literature. Normally all that might expected at that level might be a ‘long essay’. That’s all I had to do.

It’s also theoretically possible that one might do a MA purely from secondary data (but perhaps less likely), and it’s exceedingly UN-likely that you’d get away at PhD level without rustling up your own data. English literature student stand fast...

Which is why my spidey sense is tingling. If this had been discussed with the supervisor I suggest that it’s quite unlikely that primary research would have been thought necessary, so none of the above would have come up. As we both agree (I think) undergrad work is a long essay-not a piece of original research.

I also very much doubt in this snow-flaked, safe-spaced, risk-assessed world, said undergrad would be let loose on us.

So, I wonder if this isn’t a case of the OP getting a little over-enthusiastic. Many of us (myself included) we’re guilty of a dangerous application of initiative in our younger years. I also note we’ve heard nothing of our OP since.

The alternative is a bit of sloppy supervision by some archetypal leftie academic who has bought their own anti-military biases to the table. Not to be dismissed: I’ve encountered a few myself.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I'll fill in the survey after you pm me an address so I can submit an invoice billing you for my time :)
 
Yes and no.

It may differ between courses but for my BA there was, as t’other Bob says, no primary research. It was all done from the literature. Normally all that might expected at that level might be a ‘long essay’. That’s all I had to do.

Psychology is different - as far as I'm aware, people on the BA/joint honours do a prolonged literature review, people on the BSc do an experimental project. At least that's my experience, and I'm pretty sure they need to produce an "original" piece of research in order to get graduate basis of registration with the British Psychological Society. A research piece where they collect and analyse the data is a core part of the curriculum.


It’s also theoretically possible that one might do a MA purely from secondary data (but perhaps less likely), and it’s exceedingly UN-likely that you’d get away at PhD level without rustling up your own data. English literature student stand fast...

Maybe the difference is you are from a different discipline? One of the good things about psychology is the degrees are accredited by the British Psychology Society, which theoretically means a student from a modest university should have the same baseline knowledge and experience as a student from an elite Russel Group institution. (as an example, they have recently started a push that we will soon have to start teaching programming skills at undergrad; another benefit is they set a minimum student:lecturer ratio, which is good in these days of academic redundancies.

Which is why my spidey sense is tingling. If this had been discussed with the supervisor I suggest that it’s quite unlikely that primary research would have been thought necessary, so none of the above would have come up. As we both agree (I think) undergrad work is a long essay-not a piece of original research.

Nope it is most certainly (in psychology) an experimental project - I've pushed a few of mine towards performing truly original pieces of work, but its actually a balls ache and more hassle than it is worth (having just learnt this lesson - don't potentially embarrass yourself in front of collaborators by claiming you have a student collecting the data, only to find said student never checks their emails and disappears for weeks on end!).

I also very much doubt in this snow-flaked, safe-spaced, risk-assessed world, said undergrad would be let loose on us.

Nope, I have students working on things like alcohol consumption etc, at least two of mine are being let loose into the wider world with a laptop to administer an experimental task and questionnaires asking about stress/depression scores, and alcohol consumption.

So, I wonder if this isn’t a case of the OP getting a little over-enthusiastic. Many of us (myself included) we’re guilty of a dangerous application of initiative in our younger years. I also note we’ve heard nothing of our OP since.


The alternative is a bit of sloppy supervision by some archetypal leftie academic who has bought their own anti-military biases to the table. Not to be dismissed: I’ve encountered a few myself.

Take part in the study - it's literally a few questionnaires and the ones about military service are most benign. They only ask if you have deployed and how long you served for. Nothing at all that could be considered invasive. And not sure if he is a lefty academic - his bio on the university website indicates he's a clinical psychologist, so he's an autonomous clinician similar to a psychiatrist. His CV indicates time at St Andrews and also one of the decent institutions in London, so I think he knows what he's doing.
 
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Nato123

War Hero
Get the survey posted and we'll complete and or critique in equal measure.

No bone questions!
 
Yes and no.

It may differ between courses but for my BA there was, as t’other Bob says, no primary research. It was all done from the literature. Normally all that might expected at that level might be a ‘long essay’. That’s all I had to do.

It’s also theoretically possible that one might do a MA purely from secondary data (but perhaps less likely), and it’s exceedingly UN-likely that you’d get away at PhD level.
Neither of my Masters allowed primary research. My most recent had a Masters by Research option, which basically took out all the electives and put in a research project that started with a module on ethics. I’m currently the early stages of a DBA and, no surprise, there’s a significant compulsory component in research methods and ethics before I’m allowed to even frame any primary research. Which is why I made the observation.

Having completed the OPs research questionnaire, I’m amazed it got passed an ethics review.
 
Neither of my Masters allowed primary research. My most recent had a Masters by Research option, which basically took out all the electives and put in a research project that started with a module on ethics. I’m currently the early stages of a DBA and, no surprise, there’s a significant compulsory component in research methods and ethics before I’m allowed to even frame any primary research. Which is why I made the observation.

Having completed the OPs research questionnaire, I’m amazed it got passed an ethics review.
Assaid you must do a research project to get a BPS accredited degree. (They also do plenty of stuff around ethics and research before getting to this stage). I thought it was the same for all degrees - so interesting that this appears to be something specific to psychology as both you and other bob have different experiences. I suspect its a BA vs BSc thing.

"Education providers must include a statement in their programme handbook(s) advising students that, in order to be eligible for the GBC, they must pass the empirical psychology project, and gain at least a Lower Second Class Honours degree, or its equivalent (i.e. an overall pass mark of at least 50 per cent for conversion programmes).".

"Subject-specific skills Graduates are able to: i. reason scientifically, understand the role of evidence and make critical judgements about arguments in Psychology; ii. adopt multiple perspectives and systematically analyse the relationships between them; iii. detect meaningful patterns in behaviour and evaluate their significance; iv. recognise the subjective and variable nature of individual experience; v. pose, operationalise and critique research questions; vi. demonstrate substantial competence in research skills through practical activities; vii.reason analytically and demonstrate competence in a range of quantitative and qualitative methods; viii.competently initiate, design, conduct and report on an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, and recognise its theoretical, practical and methodological implications and limitations;".

"h. Empirical Project A graduate of psychology will have successfully completed a series of practical reports throughout their programme, culminating in an empirical project reporting on a substantial piece of research (or a piece of work which delivers the same learning outcomes of equal quality). The project typically involves the collection of original empirical data from participants, or equivalent alternatives such as computational modelling of empirical data or secondary data analysis, such as a meta-analysis [section 5.8 Subject Benchmark Statement]. The empirical practical component will normally involve the completion of a psychology project at Level 6 or above. The project must be passed and cannot be condoned or compensated. The empirical psychology project will include carrying out an extensive piece of empirical research that requires them individually to demonstrate a range of research skills including planning, considering and resolving ethical issues, analysis and dissemination of findings [section 4.4 of the Subject Benchmark Statement]. Students may undertake their empirical projects as part of a project or laboratory group, provided they are still required to demonstrate the above skills individually".




And what do you feel is ethically problematic about the OPs study?
 
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Haha no handbag swinging here - I'm interested that other disciplines don't require a research component at undergraduate level - I've learnt something, as I thought everyone had to a research component including primary data collection. Perhaps an education thread would be more appropriate!

(although I'm sure the OP doesn't mind if this keeps pushing their thread to the top of the forum).
 
Haha no handbag swinging here - I'm interested that other disciplines don't require a research component at undergraduate level - I've learnt something, as I thought everyone had to a research component including primary data collection. Perhaps an education thread would be more appropriate!

(although I'm sure the OP doesn't mind if this keeps pushing their thread to the top of the forum).
Only joking, I kept thinking "You wouldn't get this in The NAAFI!"

I've only got "O" level English, so it's nice to read two masters debating.
 
Assaid you must do a research project to get a BPS accredited degree. (They also do plenty of stuff around ethics and research before getting to this stage). I thought it was the same for all degrees - so interesting that this appears to be something specific to psychology as both you and other bob have different experiences. I suspect its a BA vs BSc thing.

"Education providers must include a statement in their programme handbook(s) advising students that, in order to be eligible for the GBC, they must pass the empirical psychology project, and gain at least a Lower Second Class Honours degree, or its equivalent (i.e. an overall pass mark of at least 50 per cent for conversion programmes).".

"Subject-specific skills Graduates are able to: i. reason scientifically, understand the role of evidence and make critical judgements about arguments in Psychology; ii. adopt multiple perspectives and systematically analyse the relationships between them; iii. detect meaningful patterns in behaviour and evaluate their significance; iv. recognise the subjective and variable nature of individual experience; v. pose, operationalise and critique research questions; vi. demonstrate substantial competence in research skills through practical activities; vii.reason analytically and demonstrate competence in a range of quantitative and qualitative methods; viii.competently initiate, design, conduct and report on an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, and recognise its theoretical, practical and methodological implications and limitations;".

"h. Empirical Project A graduate of psychology will have successfully completed a series of practical reports throughout their programme, culminating in an empirical project reporting on a substantial piece of research (or a piece of work which delivers the same learning outcomes of equal quality). The project typically involves the collection of original empirical data from participants, or equivalent alternatives such as computational modelling of empirical data or secondary data analysis, such as a meta-analysis [section 5.8 Subject Benchmark Statement]. The empirical practical component will normally involve the completion of a psychology project at Level 6 or above. The project must be passed and cannot be condoned or compensated. The empirical psychology project will include carrying out an extensive piece of empirical research that requires them individually to demonstrate a range of research skills including planning, considering and resolving ethical issues, analysis and dissemination of findings [section 4.4 of the Subject Benchmark Statement]. Students may undertake their empirical projects as part of a project or laboratory group, provided they are still required to demonstrate the above skills individually".




And what do you feel is ethically problematic about the OPs study?
I think some of the questions could distress or harm vulnerable participants. They are questions appropriate for a counsellor / patient private consultation not for an undergraduate research paper.

I also question whether primary research is even necessary. I suspect there’s a stack of secondary data available on this.
 

BopBopBop

Old-Salt
They sent a psychologist to interview us all in the hope it would add value to the future selection process for new troops and prevent wastage.

The questions were straightforward and included "Why did you want to join the army?"

He got quite excited when one of the answers he got back was "I joined the army to forget".

He leaned forward, stroking his chin and pencil poised.

"What did you want to forget?".



"I can't remember now"

When we saw the results of his research, which should have identified the qualities he thought were desirable, I thought they were the exact opposite of what I was.
 
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