Psychology Project Participants Request

Good Morning!

I am a student in my final year at the University of Suffolk, studying BSc Psychology and Criminology. As part of my last year of studying, I have to undertake a Psychology Research Project for my dissertation and I have chosen to use this to explore how demographics, military service information and mental health (specifically anxiety and depression) can predict risk-taking behaviour (specifically alcohol misuse and levels of anger/aggression) in serving military personnel and veterans in the UK.
For this reason, I was wondering whether anybody would be willing to give a moment of their time to fill in my questionnaire?

https://uospsychology.fra1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5iR3IXd5NJRUd3T

I have been granted permission from Bad CO to post on your website.

Many thanks!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Due to my lack of posting on the forum, I'm unable to post the link therefore Bad CO has said that they will share the link for me after receiving my email
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Perhaps you might also consider the psychological impact on service families of marrying into the job, moving around constantly, never having a career of your own, losing children all over the world, losing your spouse to long tours or worse?
 
I wonder when someone is going to produce a dissertation on the number of ex-squaddies who go on to lead successful normal lives as engineers, doctors, musicians, company directors, technicians, unicorns or any other of the myriad paths to take other than the traditional angry, drunken, wife-beating PTSD victim?
 

Mrsheeny

Old-Salt
Good Morning!

I am a student in my final year at the University of Suffolk, studying BSc Psychology and Criminology. As part of my last year of studying, I have to undertake a Psychology Research Project for my dissertation and I have chosen to use this to explore how demographics, military service information and mental health (specifically anxiety and depression) can predict risk-taking behaviour (specifically alcohol misuse and levels of anger/aggression) in serving military personnel and veterans in the UK.
For this reason, I was wondering whether anybody would be willing to give a moment of their time to fill in my questionnaire?
(Please find link below)

I have been granted permission from Bad CO to post on your website.

Many thanks!
What do you mean by alcohol misuse? Like putting lager in your central heating system?
 
Good Morning!

I am a student in my final year at the University of Suffolk, studying BSc Psychology and Criminology. As part of my last year of studying, I have to undertake a Psychology Research Project for my dissertation and I have chosen to use this to explore how demographics, military service information and mental health (specifically anxiety and depression) can predict risk-taking behaviour (specifically alcohol misuse and levels of anger/aggression) in serving military personnel and veterans in the UK.
For this reason, I was wondering whether anybody would be willing to give a moment of their time to fill in my questionnaire?
(Please find link below - will be posted soon by admin)

I have been granted permission from Bad CO to post on your website.

Many thanks!
As someone with a PhD in a social science I feel I should point out to you that it would be very dangerous to assume a priori that there is any greater prevalence of these conditions amongst ex-service personnel.

After that documentary ‘RAMBO’ was released, it was assumed by many that this was a serious issue amongst Vietnam Veterans. It turned out that the incidence of suicides (for example) was slightly lower than amongst the same cohort of non-veterans.

You need to get your epidemiology squared away first. So a case-control study might be appropriate. Get a reputable source, such as the Army Medical Services, rather than the Daily Mail. Or here*

Once you’ve established a statistically-significant difference (allowing for random effects and confounding variables) THEN you can go about trying to attribute a causal relationship, though perhaps you’re only likely to identify correlation, and not causality.

This could be a big project, so you might want to have a chat with your tutor to make sure that you don’t go overboard. You’re only trying to pass, not get a Nobel Prize.

* The problem with qualitative surveys on places like here is ‘self selection bias’.**

** and that most of us are cnuts***

***That’s an anagram, not a Viking.
 
A couple of days ago, in the wake of the recently started Afrika Korps thread, I asked Loofkar senior, an 8th Army vet, some questions about his service in North Africa. Our chat developed and soon we were on the push through from Gold Beach through France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. He recounted that after the crossing of the Rhine, expecting to engage in more fighting, they came across several allied gliders that appeared to have had been shot down by a 20 mm Flakvierling, which the German forces (he said the soldiers weren't actually Germans but of some other ethnicity) had, by then abandoned there. All the occupants of the gliders were dead - the carnage must have been unimaginable. He said he tried to look for a way to avoid having to collect and bury them, I don't know if he succeeded. He also mentioned an enraged French couple who insisted he come into their house, which was by the roadside, and showed him bullet holes in the wall above the childrens' beds - apparently the retreating Germans fired at the houses with machine guns.
After years of serving in the light infantry in North Africa, Italy, Normandy to Germany, he was demobbed and just went back to resume life at home.

Well Ms Loofkar senior was with us, and I couldn't help asking them - after the war, did he have trauma, PTSD, nightmares, whatever? Did he get counselling or psychological support. NOWT to this day they replied. Neither did he appear to need it.
I am inclined to believe that his story is not exceptional.

It leaves me pondering what might have changed in society / culture / human beings to make psychological health considerations so radically different from the 1940's.
 
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Nato123

War Hero
As someone with a PhD in a social science I feel I should point out to you that it would be very dangerous to assume a priori that there is any greater prevalence of these conditions amongst ex-service personnel.

After that documentary ‘RAMBO’ was released, it was assumed by many that this was a serious issue amongst Vietnam Veterans. It turned out that the incidence of suicides (for example) was slightly lower than amongst the same cohort of non-veterans.

You need to get your epidemiology squared away first. So a case-control study might be appropriate. Get a reputable source, such as the Army Medical Services, rather than the Daily Mail. Or here*

Once you’ve established a statistically-significant difference (allowing for random effects and confounding variables) THEN you can go about trying to attribute a causal relationship, though perhaps you’re only likely to identify correlation, and not causality.

This could be a big project, so you might want to have a chat with your tutor to make sure that you don’t go overboard. You’re only trying to pass, not get a Nobel Prize.

* The problem with qualitative surveys on places like here is ‘self selection bias’.**

** and that most of us are cnuts***

***That’s an anagram, not a Viking.
Well played Sir.

I'm a mere Batchelor boy, but I too studied Social Science - at Southbank - as a mature student, often older than some of my Lecturers TBH.

It gave me a healthy disregard for most stats and opinions casually printed and voiced by the media, but also a great enlightenment on many other core subjects.

It was , for me, a very good, enjoyable degree, party because it quantified my own experiences and beliefs , partly because I was surrounded by chicks, and partly because I could cycle there within the hour - with dodging the maniac drivers in Peckham and the OKR, an added pleasure.
 
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Nato123

War Hero
A couple of days ago I asked Loofkar senior, an 8th Army vet, some questions about his service in North Africa, in the wake of the recently started Afrika Korps thread. Our chat developed and soon we were on the push through from Gold Beach through France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. He recounted that after the crossing of the Rhine, they came across several allied gliders that appeared to have had been shot down by a 20 mm Flakvierling, which the German forces (he said the soldiers weren't actually Germans but of some other ethnicity) had by then abandoned there. All the occupants of the gliders were killed - the carnage must have been unimaginable. He said he tried to look for a way to avoid having to collect and bury them, I don't know if he succeeded. He also mentioned a furious French couple who insisted he come into their house, which was by the roadside, and showed him bullet holes in the wall above the childrens' beds - apparently the retreating Germans fired at the houses with machine guns.
After years of serving in the light infantry in North Africa, Italy, Normandy,to Germany, he was demobbed and just went back to resume life at home.

Well Ms Loofkar senior was with us, and I couldn't help asking them - after the war, did he have trauma, PTSD, nightmares, whatever? Did he get counselling or psychological support. NOWT to this day they replied. Neither did he appear to need it.
I am inclined to believe that his story is not exceptional.

It leaves me pondering what might have changed in society / culture / human beings to make psychological health considerations so radically different from the 1940's.

Tougher Childhood's where brothers and Sisters - and other relatives did die of diseases we don't hear about anymore plus the 'rule' that everyone has to be an attention seeking victim of something now in order to justify various character failings on their part along with the massive growth of the the industry that provides care for them.

Those that go about the daily business , enduring the daily grind with good nature acceptance and mentally giving thanks for what they have actually got, are ignored and left out of consideration, to me, these are the real heroes i.e those that just get the feck on with things.

However, if you look at those who served in the Falklands, who suffer from PTSD or have commited suicide versus those who lost their lives in the actual conflict, it's surprisingly high when I consider that their childhood - growing up in the 60's and 70's - was similar to mine.

There's a something to be said for the old grin and bear it in some cases as you comment proves.
 
Perhaps you might also consider the psychological impact on service families of marrying into the job, moving around constantly, never having a career of your own, losing children all over the world, losing your spouse to long tours or worse?
**** 'em, they knew what they were getting themselves into.
 
As someone with a PhD in a social science I feel I should point out to you that it would be very dangerous to assume a priori that there is any greater prevalence of these conditions amongst ex-service personnel.

After that documentary ‘RAMBO’ was released, it was assumed by many that this was a serious issue amongst Vietnam Veterans. It turned out that the incidence of suicides (for example) was slightly lower than amongst the same cohort of non-veterans.

You need to get your epidemiology squared away first. So a case-control study might be appropriate. Get a reputable source, such as the Army Medical Services, rather than the Daily Mail. Or here*

Once you’ve established a statistically-significant difference (allowing for random effects and confounding variables) THEN you can go about trying to attribute a causal relationship, though perhaps you’re only likely to identify correlation, and not causality.

This could be a big project, so you might want to have a chat with your tutor to make sure that you don’t go overboard. You’re only trying to pass, not get a Nobel Prize.

* The problem with qualitative surveys on places like here is ‘self selection bias’.**

** and that most of us are cnuts***

***That’s an anagram, not a Viking.

I've read the OPs post a few times, and I don't see anything mentioning that she expects these things to be higher in military populations; to me it looks like she's seeing if the pathway towards risk taking behaviour can be predicted by a number of variables, including military service.

Also its an undergrad project, so needs to be nowhere near as sophisticated as your mention. It's likely they won't need to use anything more complicated than multivariate regression using the measures she is proposing, which knowing how most psych undergraduates are, is probably is enough to fill the OP with dread as it is - lets not try freak her out (or add to the pastoral workload of her tutor!).

OP - good luck with you project. I've not filled it out yet, but I will make the time in the next few days.

Edit: and in addition to here, I trust you have considered the various facebook service groups. To be honest you may get better data in those as usually members are (informally) vetted to ensure they have actually served etc.

Also as I say, I've not filled it in yet, so no idea if you ask this, but you may wish to distinguish between TA/regular soldiers - no idea if its too late to add this question on, or if you have to resubmit ethics.
 
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A couple of days ago, in the wake of the recently started Afrika Korps thread, I asked Loofkar senior, an 8th Army vet, some questions about his service in North Africa. Our chat developed and soon we were on the push through from Gold Beach through France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. He recounted that after the crossing of the Rhine, expecting to engage in more fighting, they came across several allied gliders that appeared to have had been shot down by a 20 mm Flakvierling, which the German forces (he said the soldiers weren't actually Germans but of some other ethnicity) had, by then abandoned there. All the occupants of the gliders were dead - the carnage must have been unimaginable. He said he tried to look for a way to avoid having to collect and bury them, I don't know if he succeeded. He also mentioned an enraged French couple who insisted he come into their house, which was by the roadside, and showed him bullet holes in the wall above the childrens' beds - apparently the retreating Germans fired at the houses with machine guns.
After years of serving in the light infantry in North Africa, Italy, Normandy to Germany, he was demobbed and just went back to resume life at home.

Well Ms Loofkar senior was with us, and I couldn't help asking them - after the war, did he have trauma, PTSD, nightmares, whatever? Did he get counselling or psychological support. NOWT to this day they replied. Neither did he appear to need it.
I am inclined to believe that his story is not exceptional.

It leaves me pondering what might have changed in society / culture / human beings to make psychological health considerations so radically different from the 1940's.
Possibly the same type of phenomena that caused a London Bridge 'survivor' to say he had seen things he will never be able to forget.............such as a beardy guy getting chased by a loonie brandishing a fire extinguisher and another loonie poking him with a stick.........compensation surely, judicial or public inquiry perhaps.....ffs
 
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