Psychology jobs in army

#2
All Officers have to understand psychology especially if you want to succeed as a Staff Officer.
 
#4
do you mean a psychiatrist?
 
#5
Not sure about jobs, but you'll find plenty of distressed troops on this site.
 
#8
Hi all,

I was wondering if there was any jobs out there in the wide world of the army involving psychology as an officer.

Thanks.
Yes there are.

Now piss off before I bum you into the middle of next week.

All the best.
 
#13
So i'm getting the impression that they are not popular here then.. haha
Not quite, they have a job to do and just like everywhere, some are great, some are average and some are crap.
 
#15
Engineering or psychology...

If you are quallified you could get some sort of number in the medics as a trick cyclist.
 
#16
Hi all,
I was wondering if there was any jobs out there in the wide world of the army involving psychology as an officer.
Thanks.
The sort of psychology I think you mean (clinical psychology, counselling psychology, cognitive etc (and includes forensic psychologists, the *******)) requires the practitioner's first and overriding responsibility to be to the patient. I don't think (and I would be more than happy to hear things are otherwise) this is compatible with the requirements of service, be it as a soldier or an officer, which default unthinkingly to the "soldier/officer first, psychologist (or whatever you happen to be) second" model. Especially as the service and its masters are often cnuts. All the same, your own enquiry suggests an interest in a particularly worthy pursuit; perhaps it's worth a look to see how far civilian services extend into what you're interested in, it might be further than you think. Best of luck.
 
#17
The sort of psychology I think you mean (clinical psychology, counselling psychology, cognitive etc (and includes forensic psychologists, the *******)) requires the practitioner's first and overriding responsibility to be to the patient. I don't think (and I would be more than happy to hear things are otherwise) this is compatible with the requirements of service, be it as a soldier or an officer, which default unthinkingly to the "soldier/officer first, psychologist (or whatever you happen to be) second" model. Especially as the service and its masters are often cnuts. All the same, your own enquiry suggests an interest in a particularly worthy pursuit; perhaps it's worth a look to see how far civilian services extend into what you're interested in, it might be further than you think. Best of luck.
You know the QARANC hold Psych nurses don't you? From at least WO2 - Lt (as I've met these varients) but probably the full structure. The other two Nursing Corps probably hold them too. All three seem to mix the requirements of military life with medical situations quite well.
 
#18
You know the QARANC hold Psych nurses don't you? From at least WO2 - Lt (as I've met these varients) but probably the full structure. The other two Nursing Corps probably hold them too. All three seem to mix the requirements of military life with medical situations quite well.
No I didn't mate; it's been a long long time and the only contact I ever had with QARANC was with a Dental Hygienist in 1977, and she did my mental health a lot of good, it being my first contact with stockings and suspenders and all.

That said, a good Psych nurse is worth its weight in gold and that they exist in QARANC etc is encouraging. Outside, RMNs and especially CPNs often have a very good eye for the patient's needs, training and experience in CBT, DBT or whatever the latest or local in-thing is, and significantly more contact time with patients than any other discipline. I am assuming that similar factors prevail in a military situation, however it remains (and this is only my own view, but I have experience of both milieux) that the relationship between the therapist and the patient is extremely significant, and is based on a number of factors of which, I feel, the rank structure of the military likely takes priority, and at some point will destabilise the patient/therapist compact.

What I think the young man is getting at (from his original question) was a commissioned post in psychology, which leads me to consider his question in the light of him being a trained and practising psychologist, bearing significant rank, who will be required to work with people more often than not of lesser rank. It is my view that sooner or later the two worlds will collide, and damage (for want of a better word) will be the likely upshot to both parties.

I think my point is that "psychology" might well have benefit to the patient; this is subjective, but the psychologists will no doubt assert otherwise ^_~ My (professional) experience is that results vary too much for outcomes to be measured accurately, but that the psychologist usually does very well out of the experience before moving on to another CV milestone. The single most important indicator of the outcome of psychological therapy will be, as it is in other therapies, the quality of the patient/therapist relationship, based on possibly the three factors of trust, credibility and empathy, and it is the unfortunate situation that, in a military situation, one of these factors will become compromised, and the relationship will fail as a result.

That'll teach me to go gobbing off on a Friday night. Don't even get me started on psychiatrists (for whom I have much time in civvy strasse): "I'm a Colonel first and a psychiatrist second" I shit you not. What a ****.
 
#19
TBH in both cases I actually found the guys very good (I didn't go to them for sessions mind). The Lt was a TA and very much a Psycher in Green, and the WO2 was reg, but again very much medic first WO2 second. I doubt he'd be gripping anyone other than his staff for long sidies for example.
 
#20
TBH in both cases I actually found the guys very good (I didn't go to them for sessions mind). The Lt was a TA and very much a Psycher in Green, and the WO2 was reg, but again very much medic first WO2 second. I doubt he'd be gripping anyone other than his staff for long sidies for example.
I fully expect that things have moved on significantly in the past few years (presumably correspondent with the burgeoning acceptance of "psychology" as legitimate and valid), and I defer readily to your more recent experience.

Nurses each, I am presuming? I am of the firm view that so-called "psychological interventions" are far more consistently delivered by nurses are by far more effective than those delivered by "psychologists".

I have witnessed sidies on a WRAC, but not on a QARANC, although my experience of them was limited. Happy, but limited. I also witnessed the said WRAC lamp, to good effect, a member of 29 Cdo; I imagine her MT Sgt thought it prudent to allow her a certain latitude in the matter of her hirsuteness.
 

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