PSNI Officer baiting a republican- bants

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Is it only the colleagues murdered by republicans they honour?

Or do the first and last RUC officers in Northern Ireland murdered by terrorists not count in their book? Victor Arbuckle and Frank O"Reilly, both murdered by fine upstanding, protestant, true-blue and no doubt poppy-wearing, loyalists?

Whatever, the salient points are:

a) the poppy is a symbol that represents a charity, a very honourable one with a proud history, dedicated to looking after the welfare of ex-servicemen. The ginger cop looks too young to be an ex-serviceman and anyway he is a member of a civilian police service which has no connection with the British armed forces,

b) it is customary to wear that symbol in the first week of November, it is odd to wear it in the middle of August, and especially odd to wear it on one's shoulder

and c) which relates to (a) the poppy is a neutral symbol of a charity, it is not some sort of sectarian totem used to rub in the noses of fellow citizens whose politics you happen not to agree with, and should certainly not be worn as such by a servant of the state.

Wear your poppy correctly and with dignity at the proper time of the year, don't debase a proud symbol just because you think it will get a rise out of the Fenians.
I should write a letter to the Times about it if I was you. Waste of good self righteous indignation frothing about it here, when you could have a much wider audience out there.
 
Is it only the colleagues murdered by republicans they honour?

Or do the first and last RUC officers in Northern Ireland murdered by terrorists not count in their book? Victor Arbuckle and Frank O"Reilly, both murdered by fine upstanding, protestant, true-blue and no doubt poppy-wearing, loyalists?

Whatever, the salient points are:

a) the poppy is a symbol that represents a charity, a very honourable one with a proud history, dedicated to looking after the welfare of ex-servicemen. The ginger cop looks too young to be an ex-serviceman and anyway he is a member of a civilian police service which has no connection with the British armed forces,

b) it is customary to wear that symbol in the first week of November, it is odd to wear it in the middle of August, and especially odd to wear it on one's shoulder

and c) which relates to (a) the poppy is a neutral symbol of a charity, it is not some sort of sectarian totem used to rub in the noses of fellow citizens whose politics you happen not to agree with, and should certainly not be worn as such by a servant of the state.

Wear your poppy correctly and with dignity at the proper time of the year, don't debase a proud symbol just because you think it will get a rise out of the Fenians.
When you’ve finished frothing and dried your wet knickers you might want to ask one of them yourself instead of dripping to some stranger on the internet. As mentioned, I wear mine in November. With regards the equivalence between terrorists, I’d take an educated guess and say the colleagues and family of Victor Arbuckle would hold loyalist terrorists in equal contempt to republicans, I personally know several who served with Frankie O’Reilly. I would confidently say that none of them would discriminate between murdering scumbags on the basis of what side of the divide they’re from. Of those few peelers I know who do wear a poppy symbol, I can’t think of any who do so to Purely to “get a rise”. One I know personally does so as his policeman father was murdered by terrorists. His ex UDR uncle has two prosthetic limbs due to a terrorist bomb. He’s seen a number of his colleagues murdered and maimed by terrorists. He’s one of the easiest going people I know and certainly, as far as policing is concerned fulfils his duties without fear nor favour. He wears a poppy symbol on the flap of a pouch on his duty belt as a personal daily reminder of friends and family lost in this squalid little conflict. I know this because I asked him about it. As an ex-serviceman, knowing his reasons I didn’t find it being displayed “out of season” odd or distasteful. I doubt many would find such a thing offensive.
 
When you’ve finished frothing and dried your wet knickers you might want to ask one of them yourself instead of dripping to some stranger on the internet. As mentioned, I wear mine in November. With regards the equivalence between terrorists, I’d take an educated guess and say the colleagues and family of Victor Arbuckle would hold loyalist terrorists in equal contempt to republicans, I personally know several who served with Frankie O’Reilly. I would confidently say that none of them would discriminate between murdering scumbags on the basis of what side of the divide they’re from. Of those few peelers I know who do wear a poppy symbol, I can’t think of any who do so to Purely to “get a rise”. One I know personally does so as his policeman father was murdered by terrorists. His ex UDR uncle has two prosthetic limbs due to a terrorist bomb. He’s seen a number of his colleagues murdered and maimed by terrorists. He’s one of the easiest going people I know and certainly, as far as policing is concerned fulfils his duties without fear nor favour. He wears a poppy symbol on the flap of a pouch on his duty belt as a personal daily reminder of friends and family lost in this squalid little conflict. I know this because I asked him about it. As an ex-serviceman, knowing his reasons I didn’t find it being displayed “out of season” odd or distasteful. I doubt many would find such a thing offensive.
If the copper wants to wear poppies off duty he is free to do so, although he's going to look a bit daft wearing a poppy in August on the shoulder of his t-shirt.

While wearing the uniform of a civilian police service that has no connection whatsoever to the British Armed Forces (the RUC was not a part of the British military and the UDR has as much relevance to the PSNI as the Matabele Border Protection Force has to the NYPD) he shouldn't be wearing a poppy, especially in an area where the wearing of such an emblem can reasonably be seen as provocative and undermining the neutrality of policing.

That issue was settled 20 or more years ago.

End of.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
If the copper wants to wear poppies off duty he is free to do so, although he's going to look a bit daft wearing a poppy in August on the shoulder of his t-shirt.

While wearing the uniform of a civilian police service that has no connection whatsoever to the British Armed Forces (the RUC was not a part of the British military and the UDR has as much relevance to the PSNI as the Matabele Border Protection Force has to the NYPD) he shouldn't be wearing a poppy, especially in an area where the wearing of such an emblem can reasonably be seen as provocative and undermining the neutrality of policing.

That issue was settled 20 or more years ago.

End of.
If the issue was settled two decades ago, why can't he wear a poppy?
 

Greenfly

On ROPS
On ROPs
If the copper wants to wear poppies off duty he is free to do so, although he's going to look a bit daft wearing a poppy in August on the shoulder of his t-shirt.

While wearing the uniform of a civilian police service that has no connection whatsoever to the British Armed Forces (the RUC was not a part of the British military and the UDR has as much relevance to the PSNI as the Matabele Border Protection Force has to the NYPD) he shouldn't be wearing a poppy, especially in an area where the wearing of such an emblem can reasonably be seen as provocative and undermining the neutrality of policing.

That issue was settled 20 or more years ago.

End of.
Not a bad point.

I don’t know enough about it but the way I see it is that the poppy is a valid symbol, used in many countries, to remember their war dead. The difficulty here is that NI is not a normal society and it has become a political symbol - used by Protestants/Loyalists and not normally worn by Catholics/Nationalists.

Regardless of personal tragedies, members of the PSNI , or any other police force, shouldn’t wear emblems of any sort while on duty. That includes emblems denoting that they have made a donation to any charity - whether it be a sticker for the local dog shelter, a BLM collection or a poppy for the British Legion. This should be a basic fundamental of any police force and should be followed as a rule no matter how trivial the emblem or association.

Ginge was on the wind up here and is wearing a poppy in August in deepest darkest Derry.
 

Greenfly

On ROPS
On ROPs
Further- I'm wondering how it actually FEELS for a PSNI bobby to wear a poppy. In other words, what are the thoughts that go through ginge’s head as he patrols in a republican area pulling over DRs. Does he think:

a. I feel really proud to wear this thing as my great-granddad and the other lads fell at the Somme

b. It feels good to wear this because I'm British and proud of it

c. I wear this because I know it annoys the fuck out of themmuns.

My money is on c.
 

Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
Sadly there are much deeper problems to face and resolve than what sort of flower an officer wants to wear on his uniform. This clash of symbols is the result of a sad radicalisation of politics that shuts out all moderation and possible integration.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Ginge is waving a red rag to a bull, he’d probably have a lot less grief if he didn’t wear it.
I would not be in the least surprised if this pair have met up "professionally" before. The driver certainly did not seem surprised or not understanding the procedure.
 
If the copper wants to wear poppies off duty he is free to do so, although he's going to look a bit daft wearing a poppy in August on the shoulder of his t-shirt.

While wearing the uniform of a civilian police service that has no connection whatsoever to the British Armed Forces (the RUC was not a part of the British military and the UDR has as much relevance to the PSNI as the Matabele Border Protection Force has to the NYPD) he shouldn't be wearing a poppy, especially in an area where the wearing of such an emblem can reasonably be seen as provocative and undermining the neutrality of policing.

That issue was settled 20 or more years ago.

End of.
Aye cheers for your input. You’ve obviously got an agenda and a lack of understanding of some of the nuances involved. I’ve neither the time nor inclination to go back and forward with you. All the best.
 

Jammy66

War Hero
NI isn't like anywhere else in the UK though. Not many streets on the mainland paint their kerbstones red white and blue and fly union flags from the lamposts all year round / green white and orange & Irish Tricolours.

Symbolism is massive there so a little poppy pin badge takes on a rather different signifcance especially when it's a 'neutral' police officer wearing it and telling you he is harrassing you......Does he wear the poppy off duty as well I wonder?

OK the guy he's stopped may have form, but even so he comes over as a bit of an arsehole and is hardly doing much to help continue the enormous progress that we have seen in NI generally. It's sad that people who can make a difference are still keen to stir it.
 

Greenfly

On ROPS
On ROPs
Any PSNI lads would know the score with the controversies around poppies.
I wonder if Ginge is still wearing it considering his supervision will have undoubtedly been made aware of the video.
 
If the copper wants to wear poppies off duty he is free to do so, although he's going to look a bit daft wearing a poppy in August on the shoulder of his t-shirt.

While wearing the uniform of a civilian police service that has no connection whatsoever to the British Armed Forces (the RUC was not a part of the British military and the UDR has as much relevance to the PSNI as the Matabele Border Protection Force has to the NYPD) he shouldn't be wearing a poppy, especially in an area where the wearing of such an emblem can reasonably be seen as provocative and undermining the neutrality of policing.

That issue was settled 20 or more years ago.

End of.
Since when has the poppy been restricted to those with connections to the armed forces?
 
Nobody think the police officer here was being unproffessional and basically an arse? Would you like to be treated like that if you were stopped by the police?

Seems they were trying to look for trouble.
He was politeness personified until the swearing started. He knew the camera was on and didn't put a foot wrong.
 
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Anyone else got this every second comment on here? :)
 

Polyester

Old-Salt
Isn't Glasgow a bit like that?
Bits of it can be but the simmering resentments in G-town are a bit less in your face. In my experience anyway.
 
The only part that falls down is when the cop admits to harassing the guy. The back peddling was a tad cringe.

Apart from that, good drills. No different from a GDA patrol on HERRICK in essence. Disrupt the enemy and dominate the ground. Interestingly the act the cops used to stop and search under the Justice and Security (NI) Act 2007 allow PSNI to search without grounds. They should have that over here too!
You thick cunt
 
If we are being picky to quote PSNI code of ethics -

The public expects PSNI offices to act with self-control and tolerance, treating members of the public with respect and courtesy.

Did he fall beneath this standard- probably
Was it good policing- Definitely
You thick cunt
 

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