Provost Group in Afghanistan

#1
OK So it's from an Ethnic minority paper but a nice little article all the same.

Police beat is world's most dangerous

Major Maria Holliday is serving with the Royal Military Police in Afghanistan

Imagine policing a village of just 10,000 people – but having to deal with one murder a week. Then, imagine only having a dozen detectives to investigate those murders.

To add to your problems, every time they leave the office, your men and women face the threat of being shot, bombed or stepping on landmines.

That is the challenge facing two officers from the region who are in charge of the Royal Military Police, in Afghanistan.

Major Maria Holliday, from Chorley, is responsible for a team of officers approaching the end of a six-month tour, during which they have had a vast range of difficult and dangerous tasks.

Although she has a total of 77 men and women to call on, only 12 of them are detectives and they are scattered across a country that is nearly three times the size of the UK.

The detectives belong to the Special Investigations Branch – the military's equivalent of CID – and are the responsibility of Captain Phil Neville, from Bolton.

http://www.lep.co.uk/viewarticle.aspx?articleid=3164079&sectionid=73
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#2
If I was to ever (highly unlikely) do another tour, I'd like it to be with those two. Two better bosses I doubt you'd find in't Corps, bein' all northern an' that, eh oop. I'll bet their troops are chuffed with that calibre of top cover as well.

I wonder if they've introduced the joys of whippet racing and ferreting to the locals yet? I have this image in my head of Afghans in flat caps.
 
#3
A distinct lack of DE officers on Ops then?
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#4
I don't think that there is mate, but you'd have to ask someone like Jonny for an accurate figure.
 
#5
Just reminded me of the old days with NI being an exclusive LE preserve
 
#6
PN a Capt??? Last time i spoke to him he was a WO2! Fully agree that they have a set of brass ones and arnt scared to use them. Worked quite a few times as a Lance jack with PN. Good boss flat caps and all
 
#7
Biscuits_AB said:
If I was to ever (highly unlikely) do another tour, I'd like it to be with those two. Two better bosses I doubt you'd find in't Corps, bein' all northern an' that, eh oop. I'll bet their troops are chuffed with that calibre of top cover as well.

I wonder if they've introduced the joys of whippet racing and ferreting to the locals yet? I have this image in my head of Afghans in flat caps.
May be true Biscuits - she rescues a dog from every tour and I am sure this will be no exception!!
 
#8
I'll assume you're taking the michael Western.. but just in case think you'll find plenty of DE officers there.... BPO, Ops Offr, Pl Comds? And of course in the other major theatre as well. The article just reflects that deserving LE officers get command jobs these days.
 
#9
Yes I was. I know both of these people and was just having a light hearted dig on their behalf.
 
#11
And Marie tranferred to SIB when exactly?
 
#12
Ok, the dangers of a short reply not good enough...Marie (rather than the 'Maria' they keep referring to...is not Branch, but the article makes clear distinction between Branch and BPU...hence the firing off off the reply. It appears that the Lancs paper has picked up on the 'Local Boy Story'

There is still no doubt that they are both LE !

"The detectives belong to the Special Investigations Branch – the military's equivalent of CID – and are the responsibility of Captain Phil Neville, from Bolton. Since arriving in April, his team of detectives has had to investigate the deaths of 21 British troops, along with two Estonian soldiers."

'Maria says: "Quite a few uniformed officers have been in contact situations. They have come under small arms fire, as well as indirect fire from mortars and rocket-propelled grenades.'
 
#13
Sorry mate first thing in the morning stuff. This was from their local paper as a 'support the troops' type article they both eat clogs or something. Not knocking them at all I just like to post these bits of PR when I come across them in the hope that others will appreciate.
 
#14
western said:
OK So it's from an Ethnic minority paper but a nice little article all the same.

Police beat is world's most dangerous

Major Maria Holliday is serving with the Royal Military Police in Afghanistan

Imagine policing a village of just 10,000 people – but having to deal with one murder a week. Then, imagine only having a dozen detectives to investigate those murders.

To add to your problems, every time they leave the office, your men and women face the threat of being shot, bombed or stepping on landmines.

That is the challenge facing two officers from the region who are in charge of the Royal Military Police, in Afghanistan.

Major Maria Holliday, from Chorley, is responsible for a team of officers approaching the end of a six-month tour, during which they have had a vast range of difficult and dangerous tasks.

Although she has a total of 77 men and women to call on, only 12 of them are detectives and they are scattered across a country that is nearly three times the size of the UK.

The detectives belong to the Special Investigations Branch – the military's equivalent of CID – and are the responsibility of Captain Phil Neville, from Bolton.

http://www.lep.co.uk/viewarticle.aspx?articleid=3164079§ionid=73
come on!

Everyone is doing a great job on ops, from the lowley lance jack to most of the officers, they (not includoing those in article) need to forget about the mbe's etc and just get on with the job in hand and taking everyone home. P N what a guy you would go to war with him and M H both top people. It is a sausage factory to quote P N. Get the job done move on and come home.
 
#17
Knowing where they hail from I would imagine that Phil and Marie both sport such headwear when out in their whippit skin trousers while tripe hunting.
 
#19
Another 'good news' article from over there:

LEIGH HAS THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS TRAINING AFGHAN POLICE FORCE

11:40 - 06 December 2007

A devon soldier is serving in one of the most dangerous parts of Afghanistan, training recruits for the national police force.Corporal Leigh Jarratt, from Dawlish, is two months into his six-month tour of the troubled Helmand Province, at Forward Operating Base Kajaki.

The former Dawlish Community College pupil joined the Royal Military Police three and a half years ago when he was just 18.

"I always wanted to be a policeman, as my whole family has been in the police - my mum, my dad, my aunty and my uncle," he said.

"But I also wanted to travel, so joining the Royal Military Police seemed like a good way to combine the two."

Now the 21-year-old mentors up to 65 men for the Afghan National Police, as part of reconstruction efforts in Helmand.

He said: "At the moment, I'm teaching them basic combat and survival skills, as this is still a conflict zone and these skills are still very much needed. I'm going on to teach them policing, arresting, detention, searching and basic investigation skills.

"It's quite mentally tiring, but I love it. The job gives me the best of both worlds, as I get to be a soldier and a policeman at the same time.

"Seeing the recruits go through their training is also very rewarding, as I see the end result.

"It can be challenging. A lot of the guys in the Afghan National Police are illiterate and we have had to develop new training techniques to overcome that.

"Everything we teach them has to be done through verbal or physical lessons. There are a few people who can read and write and they are the people we get to fill in the forms.

"We are hoping to run numeracy and literacy courses for the others soon. The majority of them are incredibly keen to learn and they say 'thank you' at the end of every day for what we taught them. Their thirst for knowledge is pretty amazing."

Cpl Jarratt is impressed with the progress his recruits are making.

"They are very professional in their attitudes," he said.

"At the moment, they mainly man security check points around Kajaki Forward Operating Base, but as the civilian population returns to the area as security improves, they will be called on to do more policing and I'm sure they will do it well."

Since he has been based in Afghanistan, Cpl Jarratt has been learning Pashtun, the local dialect of Helmand Province.

He added: "It's important to learn the local language. It shows the Afghan people you are making an effort and they respect that.

"I'm also conscious to follow their customs, so as not to offend them. It's the little things, like not showing the soles of your feet to them when you are sitting down, that make a big difference."

He is also aware of the dangers of the area where he works. Last week, the interpreter who had been teaching him Pashtun was killed when he stepped on a roadside bomb.

Cpl Jarratt said: "He was a really good lad and we got quite close in the two months we knew each other.

"He was a friend, not just someone I worked with, and he was only 19. But I have to get on with the job I'm here to do - what else can I do?"

Cpl Jarratt said he was looking forward to going home in January for a well-earned rest.

"I miss my family and friends and the odd pint of Guinness," he said.

"When I go home I'm just going to spend as much time with them as possible and have a few pints. If I've got time, I'll try and catch an Exeter City match, too."
 

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