Proud Dad / Some advice please?

Cheers
 
Police dogs. These are worth their weight in gold as crime fighting tools. Principle use is when a suspect is disturbed in a burglary and decamps known in police jargon as 'Suspects on' (premises). First officer goes to the scene and finds out what has happened. Other officers surround the area. Dog unit arrives and tracks from the scene after billy the burglar. Helicopter called if available and uses infra red camera if BB and pals are hiding near the scene. Dogs are also useful in minor public order situations where yobs are playing up and gobbing off. A couple of police dogs in full land shark mode displaying snarling teeth works wonders.

However, contrary to what some people might think, they cannot (or can't be arsed) distinguish between the goodies and baddies and its best not to get too close to them as blue on blue can easly happen. I can't remember if it was a 'suspects on' or a public order situation but a dog handler told me that his dog was less than an inch from taking a large chunk out of my calf. After that I always gave them a wide berth. If they were out tracking in my direction I would stay in the car just in case Rin Tin Tin's 'Identification, Friend or Foe' doggy radar was defective.
 

The_Poltroon

Old-Salt
As an ex copper myself I implore her not to join.

She'll be swamped under a mountain of paperwork and bureaucracy and will generally despise the job after a very short time.
 
I echo the comments made by @supermatelot and others regarding persec and locking down social media. I have been advised by colleagues, one of whom is heavily into OSINT, to minimise my digital footprint. I have a FB account but I have restricted who can see it. I have never posted anything at all about my current employment and I don't have any recent phots or any personal details on it. I don't subscribe to any other social media accounts such as tw@tter or snipchat or the like. I am quite protective of my personal information at the best of times and it's quite easy for those with even basic skills to hoover up a lot of information about an individual.

Even though I'm not Old Bill (and never have been) I've made the decision not to discuss what I do for a living and there's only one person outside my organisation that knows what I do and who it is I work for. I would suggest that anyone going into policing carefully consider and be very cautious about what job-related information they share on the t'interwebs, especially if they are looking at specialising or considering moving on to more 'interesting' roles further down the line. Not forgetting that OCGs and high level criminal individuals will seek to target police officers with the intention to threaten or intimidate them (or their families), corrupt them or worse.
 
Not needed. Recruits do an extensive officer safety course using Home Office approved techniques which are practised regulary. If you start knocking seven bells out of the baddies using Kung Fu tactics you may be questioned by a defence lawyer if the moves you used are Home Office taught and approved.

Officers are issued extendable metal batons called ASP's and CS spray which evened things up for a lot of female officers.
Do any forces use CS now? I thought most were moving or had moved to PAVA.
 
D

Deleted 4482

Guest
I echo the comments made by @supermatelot and others regarding persec and locking down social media. I have been advised by colleagues, one of whom is heavily into OSINT, to minimise my digital footprint. I have a FB account but I have restricted who can see it. I have never posted anything at all about my current employment and I don't have any recent phots or any personal details on it. I don't subscribe to any other social media accounts such as tw@tter or snipchat or the like. I am quite protective of my personal information at the best of times and it's quite easy for those with even basic skills to hoover up a lot of information about an individual.

Even though I'm not Old Bill (and never have been) I've made the decision not to discuss what I do for a living and there's only one person outside my organisation that knows what I do and who it is I work for. I would suggest that anyone going into policing carefully consider and be very cautious about what job-related information they share on the t'interwebs, especially if they are looking at specialising or considering moving on to more 'interesting' roles further down the line. Not forgetting that OCGs and high level criminal individuals will seek to target police officers with the intention to threaten or intimidate them (or their families), corrupt them or worse.
Whatever your job role is, I bet being vertical does not figure too highly in the activities :)
 
Two things.

Enrol into some manner of self defence class; regardless of her future career path, the ability to look after oneself has never been a handicap. In this regard, Krav Maga is rarely found wanting.

Get an interest outside of work. Be that classical guitar, Banksy's finest works, learning Serbo-Croat or piano lessons. Have somewhere you can retreat to when the world of work gets a bit severe.

Ah - now my fondness for martial arts and Krav Maga in particular is well known to my mates and on here.

Two no duff suggestions.

1/ Careful with that in training. Firstly, back when I went through Hendon they didn't want me rolling around playing Judo for fear of injury and backsquadding. Secondly, be the "grey man" during training and probation. Training was full of people there because they couldn't (or had never) do/done the Job; but mainly were out for promotion. And clipping a youngster's wings looks good on promotion applications.

2/ Be very very careful around use of force issues. I had a little trip to court (well, 2 1/2 years of issues) - and this was before every person had a camera phone.

That said, it is my firmly held belief that Officer Safety Training and Emergency Life Support is not fit for purpose (and the Lawrence enquiry agreed with me about the second, but not much has improved).

I'd get yourself on a St John's Ambo course or something (fortunately I had done a Combat Med Tech course before I joined), because you'll be needing that!

Krav is great, but loads of Bullshido around it (and other martial arts). Just remember; rolling around on the floor isn't like a dojo. One, there's no shido (penalty) to stop people biting you or other rubbish.

More importantly, the concrete is not as forgiving at tatami.

Oh, and be careful of the idiots sharking to shag the new probbies. Always happens, boring and predictable. Tell them to **** off back to their wives (if they haven't crashed their marriage yet), or find someone who can't see through their bullshit.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Maybe I've just been unlucky or they just don't work for me, I used to get through a pair in about 3 months. Since @MrBane kindly gave me a freebie pair of Haix boots a couple or three years ago, the only thing I've had done is have them resoled.

I didn't 'give', you chea....won. Fairly.

:D

What was the cost of the resoling?
 
Missed this, but well done to your daughter. It seems like a lot of the culture and work attitude has been neatly covered.

That said, I got the hilariously waltily named Lowa Para Recon Boots but importantly they were lightweight, well made and looked fairly smart. They have been a source of joy these last 8 years.

Also go for proper ankle boots. Short ones will see you get injured, the support is important and you need it. I had a role around whilst not wearing my proper boots and we ended up taking a tumble. My foot went black for a month with tendon damage because of how I went down. I limped for about 3 months after, although that probably wasn't helped by my not going on light duties for more than a day!
 
I limped for about 3 months after, although that probably wasn't helped by my not going on light duties for more than a day!

Don't break yourself for the job dude.

You are only a number. They'll recycle the collar numbers, just not you.
 
Don't break yourself for the job dude.

You are only a number. They'll recycle the collar numbers, just not you.

Yes, this was a very stupid and young in service Cattermole who didn't know better.

The conversation with the skipper went,
"Can't really walk, can you?"
"No Sar'nt."
"You can ride a bike though?"
"Yes Sar'nt."

And off we went.

Side note it took about two years not to feel that sarge and guv'ner weren't acceptable terms...
 
A couple of points I’d add, firstly with boots, lots of good suggestions made so far. Some forces however, still issue boots rather than having a boot allowance. If that is the case I would strongly advise not buying your own and use the issue ones. If you get injured the job may refuse any compo claim on the grounds you weren’t wearing the issue kit.


Secondly, in your daughter’s first two years she’ll be automatically enrolled in the federation’s health insurance scheme for free. After two years it’s anywhere from £25-35 a month, depending on which force you’re in. It’s a fair chunk of wedge to spend each year (especially given the piss poor wages probies are on) but I think it’s worth it. I’ve had two pretty bad injuries in the last few years and each time I was told that I was looking at a 10-12 week waiting list on the NHS for physio. Luckily I stayed in the healthcare scheme and went private. Added to that get her to pay into Flint house (or regional equivalent). It’s like Headley Court but for the police. They are miracle workers and both times I went I was back on full duties not long after. It really is worth the £9 a month you pay for it.



That leads me onto injuries and assaults. She’s going to need to accept that she will get assaulted in the job. It’s not a question of if but when. I think the national average is something like 1-2 times a year per cop. Assaults will be anything from a push or shove all the way up to GBH or murder like that poor bugger Andrew Harper. You’ve got to remember that some people are mad, bad or just desperate and think nothing of assaulting police.



That said though, I still quite like the job and even though it’s badly understaffed and overworked it’s still the best job I’ve ever had. I moan like anything about it but you get some quality comedic moments coupled with absolute tragedy and rarely are any two days the same. Make the brews and bring cakes on the first day and she’ll do alright.
 
@Countrylad Excellent advice about Flint House.

Had a trip there which got me through a couple of more years in!

Wonderful people.
 
Police dogs. These are worth their weight in gold as crime fighting tools. Principle use is when a suspect is disturbed in a burglary and decamps known in police jargon as 'Suspects on' (premises). First officer goes to the scene and finds out what has happened. Other officers surround the area. Dog unit arrives and tracks from the scene after billy the burglar. Helicopter called if available and uses infra red camera if BB and pals are hiding near the scene. Dogs are also useful in minor public order situations where yobs are playing up and gobbing off. A couple of police dogs in full land shark mode displaying snarling teeth works wonders.

However, contrary to what some people might think, they cannot (or can't be arsed) distinguish between the goodies and baddies and its best not to get too close to them as blue on blue can easly happen. I can't remember if it was a 'suspects on' or a public order situation but a dog handler told me that his dog was less than an inch from taking a large chunk out of my calf. After that I always gave them a wide berth. If they were out tracking in my direction I would stay in the car just in case Rin Tin Tin's 'Identification, Friend or Foe' doggy radar was defective.

The chap who ran the Force .22 rifle team, and taught me to shoot rifle decently, was a dog handler. Workwise hee also used to take on board the donated young dogs to assess their suitability for training for work.

He used to appear at the local footie matches on duty with his shark on a rope, he had a length of 9mm kernmantle climbing rope about 30 feet long that he used as a lead in crowd control situations. When his dog was in full on mode it would bare its teeth and show a couple of stainless steel incisors, The teeth had been replaced as the dog had been kicked in the face one time breaking the teeth...............as a result if anyone lifted a foot to put the boot in anywhere near the dog it was instantly aimed straight for the miscreants bollox. He kept his dog at home where the dog was soft as a stuffed toy, his little girls used to sit on it, pull its ears and otherwise give it a hard time, never any reaction to the kids.
 
He kept his dog at home where the dog was soft as a stuffed toy, his little girls used to sit on it, pull its ears and otherwise give it a hard time, never any reaction to the kids.
Police dogs are always kept at home. At least in the Met they were. To be a dog handler you had to have a suitable house with a garden.
 
Police dogs are always kept at home. At least in the Met they were. To be a dog handler you had to have a suitable house with a garden.

Yes, likewise, our dog unit was based at Force HQ and they used to travel out to Divisions as needed (lots of overtime). My bloke, and a couple of the others, lived in the police housing on the vast HQ grounds, all had purpose built kennels in the back gardens. The dog section/kennels building was at the back of the regional police driving school building (now no longer in existence) a walk across our sportsfields and directly adjacent to the old five a side pitches.
 

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