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Protein question.

#1
Obviously to bulk up you need to consume more protein.
As the body doesn't store protein, is it still effective to have protein before a workout?

For example earlier tonight i had some fish for dinner, so if i had a workout now would i gain any benefits from the protein in that fish?
 
#2
Of course you would but even better would be to also add whey in water post workout as it will be absorbed quicker. don't believe the protein figures given out by PT instructors and guidelines laid down. 1.5 to 2.0 grams per pound of bodyweight is what you should aim for.
 
#4
Also I would recommend some form of 'Building Block', your body will naturally vacate unused protein, If you used the blocks, your body will absorb all.
 
#5
Would sugest some complex carb post workout (fine oats are a good source), some slow release protein before bed is also useful - would go for 150g cottage cheese, and again a bowl of fine oats in the morning does the trick.

Would suggest www.myprotein.co.uk for some whey, 50g post workout (and if you like with your breakfast) will keep it in good supply when its needed.

Currently I dont see the point in whey when you can just buy whole foods for it, just grab a george foreman grill and a whole lotta chicken breast. Couple mins to cook it up and have lots of small portions throughout the day rather than fewer large meals.
 
#7
wrong.

you need calories to bulk up, not just protein.

proffesional body builders used to wake up in the middle of the night just to have a meal.

if you want to get bigger, you need to ditch the CV exercise, probably once a week, not for too long either, and shove calories and protein down your neck like its going out of fashion.

real bulking is about more then doing a few bicep curls every day.
when you go to public gyms, you see guys who sit there for hours at a time, usually checking themselves out.

if you want to get bigger overall, you need to do low reps so you pretty much max out, 10 at most. the big exercises are good, like deadlift, squat, bench press, shoulder press. do those 4 exercises with a minute or two break, just 10 reps on the heaviest weight you can safely do, and i almost guarentee you'll probably struggle just to walk out the gym. nobody who trains hard can spend hours doing it.

your back, chest and shoulders are what define your silohette, so getting them bigger is the priority. always doing exercises standing up is a must. this way you hit your core, and legs as well. isolating muscles just leads to useless strength. whats the point in looking massive if your girlfriend can carry more then you, just from her bums and tums class?
i hope thats enough for now.
chris
 
#8
No need to ditch CV for gaining mass as long as you take in the calories and don't overtrain. Obviously running 40 miles a week is going to hinder you more then running 20 miles a week. There's some big lads in the Regt and they can knock out a 10 mile tab in P Coy time.
 
#9
Fallschirmjager said:
No need to ditch CV for gaining mass as long as you take in the calories and don't overtrain. Obviously running 40 miles a week is going to hinder you more then running 20 miles a week. There's some big lads in the Regt and they can knock out a 10 mile tab in P Coy time.
well obviously this is were body type comes in. if you have a fast metabolism, you'll need very large amounts of calories anyway, and adding a lot of cv work as well , means you'd probably need so many calories that you'd spend half your life eating.

im not saying big guys cant be fit, but i would guess most have always been big. obviously you will know better then me, but i doubt many recruits turn up like sparrows knee caps and leave 4 or 5 stone heavier. like most rugby players get bulky, then get really fit, because its easier then the other way rond.

if you exercise a lot, with good protein, you will be lean rather bulky.
 
#10
OK: I seem to post on this about once a month, but I'll try again.

You do not need any protein supplements to gain weight.

The first point to consider: how much protein is enough? The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) is 0.8 grams/kg body weight/day. (If you're too lazy, or mathematically challenged, here's a pre-arranged calculator based on height and sex: daily protein calculator)

For a 6'3" male, this gives a reading of 64 grams... For 'short duration, high intensity sports', there is evidence of the need to go as high as 1.4 g/kg.

Why not just go higher? surely this won't do you any harm? Well, it may do:
According to Lemon (1995), it is important to know that protein intake twice the RDA (>1.6g/kg/day) could increase the risk of renal degeneration and heart disease and cancers.
Although the scientific evidence for harm is not conclusive, this does suggest that you should not be aiming for anything more than about 1.5g/kg/day unless you are willing to gamble with your long term health, whatever sports you are undertaking - remember that this is still nearly twice the RDA...

So, if you are a large lump - 16 stone (225lb or 102kg) of fit hunk, working out daily, you could need as much as 102 x 1.5 grams per day: that's 153 grams of protein. That's 5.4 ounces...

So, how much meat do you need to get 5.4 ounces of protein?
American studies suggest that chicken breast is roughly 1/3rd protein. Beef sirloin averages around 1/4, by the time initial trimming etc has been carried out.
Milk? around 8 grams in 250 ml.

So, let's say you have a bowl of cereal with milk for breakfast, a glass of milk at lunch, and a glass in the evening: 24 grams, or just under 1 ounce of protein.

For lunch, a half pound of chicken breast: that's 2.6 ounces of protein.

At supper, a big half pound steak: that's 2 ounces of protein.

So, ignoring any other food at all, you're at 5.6 ounces - or roughly twice the RDA of protein.

Before any abuse starts, you may then ask why body builders love all the foul tasting - and expensive - supplements. Basically, marketing. Their physiques are down to a good diet, and fanatical self-discipline/exercise.

If you want to spend money on converting your wages into protein waste products that are pissed away, it probably won't do you any harm to take supplements: if you want to build mass, a healthy diet and a disciplined training regime will do the job, saving your cash for other things.
 
#11
To be honest you want to train a different set of muscle each session, usually 1 session every other day.

I used to do strick bulk/cut's and what are you on about cutting out CV, even on bulking I did atleast 30mins running a day, often a 2mile int he morning then a jog to warm up for exercise.

Yes you should be doing alot of weight and aim for 8-12reps in sets of about 3.

The way to do it is to bulk for muscle then cut the fat away, rince and repeat.

If your lucky 1manriot might pop his head in and show us all wrong...

*edit to say that exactly as my first post stated that I find it better to eat chicken/fish for my protein rather than stock up on the powder...
 
#12
I think that the original poster should clarify whether they want to just build muscle or actually put weight on overall, to avoid the confusion in replies (some people are explaining that protein won't build overall weight (correct) and others are explaining how protein (whey supplements etc.) will help build muscle (also correct)).
 
#13
"The way to do it is to bulk for muscle then cut the fat away, rince and repeat".

My two cents - the number of people who actually manage to "bulk up" and then "cut up" is vanishingly small. People tend to just become big and fat. I'd limit the fat gain - if you absolutely cannot see any abs you are too fat, and if it goes on for a month or two you'll probably never see them again in your whole life.
 
#14
Lol where this may be very true, it is not awfully hard to shift the fat, its all about planning your diet, aslong as your loseing more calories than your consuming each day you will be cutting it down, problem is people who do a half arsed way which usually means, like you say, get fat...
 
#16
christheclimber said:
wrong.

you need calories to bulk up, not just protein.

proffesional body builders used to wake up in the middle of the night just to have a meal.

if you want to get bigger, you need to ditch the CV exercise, probably once a week, not for too long either, and shove calories and protein down your neck like its going out of fashion.

real bulking is about more then doing a few bicep curls every day.
when you go to public gyms, you see guys who sit there for hours at a time, usually checking themselves out.

if you want to get bigger overall, you need to do low reps so you pretty much max out, 10 at most. the big exercises are good, like deadlift, squat, bench press, shoulder press. do those 4 exercises with a minute or two break, just 10 reps on the heaviest weight you can safely do, and i almost guarentee you'll probably struggle just to walk out the gym. nobody who trains hard can spend hours doing it.

your back, chest and shoulders are what define your silohette, so getting them bigger is the priority. always doing exercises standing up is a must. this way you hit your core, and legs as well. isolating muscles just leads to useless strength. whats the point in looking massive if your girlfriend can carry more then you, just from her bums and tums class?
i hope thats enough for now.
chris
Agreed

Calories in> calories out, weight is gained

Low calories and a good protein intake throughout the day (modulated with carbs in the morning moving to fats in the afternoon and evening) will result in muscle growth with minimal weight (ofcourse its best to just go down the cns route. Best lb for lb)


Never train muscle groups for strength, the body doesn't work like that.
Train movements

Push (i'm more of a fan of over head pressing, bench is only really applicable to trying to get a fat chick off you), Pull, squat
 
#17
If your lucky 1manriot might pop his head in and show us all wrong...
You rang!? 8)

so if i had a workout now would i gain any benefits from the protein in that fish?
Depends on the nature of the workout.

blobmeister said:
Also I would recommend some form of 'Building Block', your body will naturally vacate unused protein, If you used the blocks, your body will absorb all.
What does this mean?

Currently I dont see the point in whey when you can just buy whole foods for it
Half agree, but its the convenience and speed of absorption that makes it superior in this context.

if you want to get bigger, you need to ditch the CV exercise
Not true, you simply need to account for the calories expelled in exercise through your diet.

like most rugby players get bulky, then get really fit, because its easier then the other way rond.
:?

botfeckid, RDA's mean nothing to the athletic/training population. Although I agree, protein is well over-rated and over-consumed. I also think your post is copied and pasted from somewhere.

ofcourse its best to just go down the cns route. Best lb for lb
Lost me there mate, central nervous system route?

Never train muscle groups for strength, the body doesn't work like that.
Train movements

Push (i'm more of a fan of over head pressing, bench is only really applicable to trying to get a fat chick off you), Pull, squat
Well and truly lost me now. And what is squatting if not a pushing movement?

To echo someone else's post at the OP, what are you looking to do mate?
 
#18
ofcourse its best to just go down the cns route. Best lb for lb
Lost me there mate, central nervous system route?

Never train muscle groups for strength, the body doesn't work like that.
Train movements

Yep, cns=central nervous system.
I was refering to a low rep, high weight scheme for basically brute strength. The same reason why people who just start lifting just seem to constantly put up bigger and bigger numbers no matter what they do. The body is adapting without laying down (much) muscle (in relation to the strength gains).
A lot of people seem to have been talking about hypertrophy, but having a strong strengtn base IMO is always best.
You can specialise for your needs later.


Push (i'm more of a fan of over head pressing, bench is only really applicable to trying to get a fat chick off you), Pull, squat
Well and truly lost me now. And what is squatting if not a pushing movement?

To echo someone else's post at the OP, what are you looking to do mate?[/quote]

Touche'
Usually when I say push I'm refering to upperbody, where a lot of people talk about bench pressing (which isn't very applicable to real world circumstances, hence the example of a fat girl on you :wink: ).
Although come to think of it dead lifts are a full body pulling motion and I would put them in the same session as BOR and pull ups. Weight usage is somewhat different though and not as taxing as DL.
I should have added core work should be included with every session.

But yeah sorry, what is the OP looking to do.
I always assume they are looking to be as strong and as fit as possible with as little weight gain as they can get away with.
 
#19
Gedge said:
Lol where this may be very true, it is not awfully hard to shift the fat...
Its true, if you are fit and packing considerable muscle mass (like you should be after a bulking program) the fat melts away very quickly with a strcit diet and some cardio.. not a big deal. Fat that has been there for years however is harder to shift.

J.
 
#20
I was refering to a low rep, high weight scheme for basically brute strength. The same reason why people who just start lifting just seem to constantly put up bigger and bigger numbers no matter what they do. The body is adapting without laying down (much) muscle (in relation to the strength gains).
Your not making much sense to me mate. CNS adaptation usually takes place in the first few weeks of lifting,

A lot of people seem to have been talking about hypertrophy, but having a strong strengtn base IMO is always best.
You can specialise for your needs later.
Depends on goals. And although not directly proportionate, they both compliment each other.

where a lot of people talk about bench pressing (which isn't very applicable to real world
Of course it is! Have you ever pushed a car? Sprinted? Closed a door?
The delts and pectoralis muscles are used every single day, not to mention the fact that it would be counter-productive leaving out a specific part of the body on that basis.

Although come to think of it dead lifts are a full body pulling motion and I would put them in the same session as BOR and pull ups. Weight usage is somewhat different though and not as taxing as DL.
I should have added core work should be included with every session.
I don't mean to offend, but I fear you have many misconceptions of resistance training!

But yeah sorry, what is the OP looking to do.
I always assume they are looking to be as strong and as fit as possible with as little weight gain as they can get away with.
Weight gain or fat gain?
 

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