Protein before basic?

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#2
Got told by one of my mates that's on his last few weeks at basic that the Army don't allow protein as when your tested for supplements it comes under as steroids or other supplements so try don't allow it? Anyone know anything more about it?


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Stop being so bloody stupid. Have you honestly heard of anyone being kicked out for eating too much tuna? You're friend is talking shite, and you are coming onto the internet to ask about it...
 

jarrod248

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Gallery Guru
#3
Got told by one of my mates that's on his last few weeks at basic that the Army don't allow protein as when your tested for supplements it comes under as steroids or other supplements so try don't allow it? Anyone know anything more about it?


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
Just eat a healthy balanced diet, young men don't need massive amounts of protein.
Try the search function too.
 
#5
Just eat a healthy balanced diet, young men don't need massive amounts of protein.
Try the search function too.

Jarrod's right, this whole culture of teens and twenty somethings feeling the need to glug down copious protein packed milkshakes morning, noon and night is a load of nonsense.

Back in the 80's when I started lifting weights we just aimed to eat a lot of eggs, and baked beans. Food was relatively expensive then, so all this lean steak nonsense wasn't a consideration for a youngster back then.

The weird thing is, most of these Gym-junkies nowadays spend a fortune on supplements, then go to McDonalds every weekend, and swill endless coke.
 
#6
Jarrod's right, this whole culture of teens and twenty somethings feeling the need to glug down copious protein packed milkshakes morning, noon and night is a load of nonsense.

Back in the 80's when I started lifting weights we just aimed to eat a lot of eggs, and baked beans. Food was relatively expensive then, so all this lean steak nonsense wasn't a consideration for a youngster back then.

The weird thing is, most of these Gym-junkies nowadays spend a fortune on supplements, then go to McDonalds every weekend, and swill endless coke.
I'm one of those people you talk about. Protein shakes are a cheap and easy way to give your body what it needs to grow (if you buy them in bulk from a website like myprotein). They don't harm you and do make it easier to gain muscle.
 
#7
I'm one of those people you talk about. Protein shakes are a cheap and easy way to give your body what it needs to grow (if you buy them in bulk from a website like myprotein). They don't harm you and do make it easier to gain muscle.
If you read 'Pumping Iron' (which incidentally is about £7.50 on MyProtein) you'll see that there really is no substitute for real food.

Maybe you are "one of those people", and as long as you don't use my money to buy your magical powders, I don't care.

It doesn't make my opinion invalid though Sammy, sorry if I pushed your buttons, it wasn't intentional!
 
#8
If you read 'Pumping Iron' (which incidentally is about £7.50 on MyProtein) you'll see that there really is no substitute for real food.

Maybe you are "one of those people", and as long as you don't use my money to buy your magical powders, I don't care.

It doesn't make my opinion invalid though Sammy, sorry if I pushed your buttons, it wasn't intentional!
I honestly don't care less. My personal opinion is that it works for some people and not for others. If you have the time, energy and money to create healthy protein full food then it's best for you. Sometimes I go to the gym straight after work, so it works for me. Horses for courses.
 
#9
I think the OP is talking about Creatine rather than tinned Tuna. And yes, at certain levels (those found in products in the PX for example) it is banned within the British Army
 
#11
I seemed to have miss interpreted that question I ment protein shakes and supplements rather than natural protein!


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And how exactly are they going to tell the difference? Protein shakes are not banned in the British Army, you cannot and will not get "kicked out" for using them. Someone has said Creatine is, however I know many many blokes who play rugby and other sports who use it and i've not heard of anyone having problems doing so.

http://www.britisharmyboxing.com/files/unregulateduseofsupplements.pdf

[SIZE=-2]1/05/2011
Directorate of Personal Services (Army)
Headquarters Land Forces
Ramillies Building
Marlborough Lines
Monxton Road
Andover
Hants
SP11 8HJ

Banned Substances

The following list identifies generic ingredients found in supplements and sports drinks that are directly banned by the IOC: Ephedrine, Pseudoephedrine, Strychnine, Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), Androstenedione, Androstenediol, 19-norandrostenedione or norandrostenediol and related compounds.

In general, single product supplements like creatine, protein, and chromium piconolate, in their pure form, are not banned. However, it must be stressed that there is no guarantee that other substances are not included.
[/SIZE]
 
#12
Is it not stuff like Jack3d and stuff like that's banned? Op if you need protein get your male friends and relatives to spaff into bottles for you. Mix it into asda's own brand vanilla milkshake and youve got the same as all these fancy powders for circa £1

Now that is a business venture worth pursuing!

Mind you, the curry houses round here have been doing it for years, with plenty of seasoning to mask the salty taste!
 
#13
Protein and Creatine supplements are not banned, and has been pointed out, can be very useful to certain types when time pressure and cooking facilities/scoff house quality become a factor.

There has been a list published, detailing supplements that have been tested and are deemed suitable (NOT ENDORSED) for consumption by British soldiers. As far as I'm aware, no list detailing unsuitable (those likely to raise an issue when drugs tested) supplements is available. I might be wrong.

DEFINITELY worth noting that the 'suitable' products list is a guide when buying from a reputable UK distributor. The same product in the US contains substances that British soldiers are banned from consuming. So be careful if purchasing from the PX or importing from abroad.
 
#16
Protein shakes aren't going to get you banned. As for protein shakes with creatine in, they're fine aswell, because your body actually makes creatine, so it's a naturally occuring substance.
 
#18
Which is why every single professional Rugby player takes Protein shakes, which is why the teams they play for buy it for them. Generally you may have a point, but for certain individuals they do work and are a useful training aid. I know for a fact that my training requires protein in that form, as I cannot get it through my diet due to time and effort involved.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#19
Which is why every single professional Rugby player takes Protein shakes, which is why the teams they play for buy it for them. Generally you may have a point, but for certain individuals they do work and are a useful training aid. I know for a fact that my training requires protein in that form, as I cannot get it through my diet due to time and effort involved.
You didn't read the link.
 
#20
Which is why every single professional Rugby player takes Protein shakes, which is why the teams they play for buy it for them. Generally you may have a point, but for certain individuals they do work and are a useful training aid. I know for a fact that my training requires protein in that form, as I cannot get it through my diet due to time and effort involved.
I doubt your activity and performance intensity is remotely comparable to that of a professional rugby player. Building a bit of 'poseur muscle' down the gym a few nights a week, and what professional sportsmen do is like comparing chalk and well, cheese my son.
 
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