Protective security top-tips

I think its about time we had a thread for some of those more choice moments from the world of padlock rattling.

a.-Sending poorly trained and poorly equipped NCOs to report back on ODS at the train station on Friday with identifiable military equipment or clothing.
b.-Recommending anti-virus software for an AFCO being actively targeted by domestic terrorists, whilst ignoring all CT measures ( RAF)
c.-Doing the night visit without a torch.
d.-Recommending a fresh topping for the fence that sits below the snow-line for months in winter.
e.-Not checking each sensor on the commissioning of the new AC12 panel. ( yes 13 sensor zones, only 12 indicators on the panel)
f. -Getting dragged out of your suspicious Black Escort TDI estate whilst on an Anti Terrorist job, and beaten by three recruiters who were fed up with the police not coming to check the vehicle out, despite repeated calls from the AFCO.
g. Ignoring documents on the file, that are recorded as already destroyed in the 102.
h.
Some years ago a UK security section had an OSINT terminal with a book next to it to record searches.
i. Sending reports back to one of your most technical sections, because they were too technical.
( we have a book by the terminal for that!)
j. We moved that AC 12 alarm panel out in to the hallway because it kept making a noise and disturbing us at work

AM sure there are a raft of others that one or two of you may be able to share with us. Points or prizes may be awarded for the person who gets closest to identifying the CI Section or Unit involved ( XMT WalrusBoy)
 
In Lisburn I dropped my 9mm on the cucumbers in Tesco's, few wide eyed customers, who looked the other way, meant I could carry on shopping at a hurried pace.


....should have added may have helped to have a correct fitting shoulder holster
 
Does "taking your white sifter with you when you finish patrolling in South Armagh" fit into this category?
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
On getting out of a Triumph Spitfire somebody's browning got spat from its holster on to the road where it fell to bits. A bunch of elderly folk stopped to watch him pick up all the pieces, shove them back into his pocket and climb back into the car.
 
The entire architecture and user software of SINOPEC (Chinese oil company - Iran) headquarters computer system bought from pirate software retailers in Tehran.

Result, everything riddled with viruses, trojans, key loggers, you name it. And what little internet bandwidth we had was being chewed up by viruses sending out spam from peoples computers and reporting everything the HQ buggers did.
 
On getting out of a Triumph Spitfire somebody's browning got spat from its holster on to the road where it fell to bits.

Am pretty sure that was not a Spitfire GT then ?
 
Does "taking your white sifter with you when you finish patrolling in South Armagh" fit into this category?

Dinger, I think you may want the " items found in de-kitted cars going back to the VSD thread?"
 
When carrying out a sy survey of an infantry training establishment it is a good idea to ensure that the snco (infantry transferee to the corps) carrying out the survey happened to the unit security officer's first Pl Sgt when the USO was a young one pip wonder fresh from Sandhurst...

Even after all that time the USO was still terrified of Mungo M...

:)

Rodney2q
 
Not many people know this, but holding the Queen's commission does not turn you into a mobile security container.

E.g.

When attending a meeting in town it is unwise to carry classified floppy discs (that dates it a bit) in your inside pocket. It is simply human nature to get blooterted in the Moon On The Mall after the meeting, but that means you will not notice the discs falling out of your pocket on the train back to the south coast port where you are based. Hurrah for the great British public who handed them in to plod.

When faced with a meeting away from the office on Monday morning it is unwise to take the necessary classified documents home on Friday afternoon. It is a failure in risk assessment to put the documents in a carrier bag and take them with you when you and wifie do the weekend shopping because 'that was more secure than leaving them in an empty house' - you will feel a silly billy when you realise you have lost the carrier bag. AFAIK the documents remain missing.
 
D

Deleted 4886

Guest
When carrying out a sy survey of an infantry training establishment it is a good idea to ensure that the snco (infantry transferee to the corps) carrying out the survey happened to the unit security officer's first Pl Sgt when the USO was a young one pip wonder fresh from Sandhurst...

Even after all that time the USO was still terrified of Mungo M...

:)

Rodney2q
Mungo was great and a laugh to work with, as well as being extremely good at his job. Drove Section cars to death but wouldn't budge above 50 in his own vehicle.
 
I would say OPSEC knowing who reads these pages but I feel there is little point ...

One of the drivers for the incidents described in this thread is the general lack of knowledge within the bulk of the Army. Ignorance driven in no small part by overclassification and unwillingness to tell anyone anything for fear some clueless part of the CoC will over-react. The other driver is the appalling institutional memory of the Army - well, lack of it to be more precise. I bet there's more usable information in this thread than the average A3 course.
 
D

Deleted 60082

Guest
Thinking that the MGS security staff in Main Building might stop a temporary cleaner leaving the building after-hours with a laptop in it's bag.

And trusting the integrity of a senior civil servant that the story wouldn't get leaked to the media.

Oh, and being trained on mobile counter-surveillance techniques and being trailed in three serials by a car that has military plates. Makes it quite easy to spot. And this was quite recently, too.
 

HE117

LE
One of the drivers for the incidents described in this thread is the general lack of knowledge within the bulk of the Army. Ignorance driven in no small part by overclassification and unwillingness to tell anyone anything for fear some clueless part of the CoC will over-react. The other driver is the appalling institutional memory of the Army - well, lack of it to be more precise. I bet there's more usable information in this thread than the average A3 course.

Spoken like a true spook!

I would have said "useful" or "informative" or "edjuktional" ... but "usable" works...
now remind me.. who was it drove the VBIED into HQ 1 BR Corps...?

Mwhaha...
 
As an aside I equipment managed covert cars for NI. Some of the B/S I used to hear from people who needed to change (to a fecking Rolls Royce:rolleyes:) was incredible. And it was across the broad spectrum of ranks as well, not just a Ruperty thing.
 

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