Propeller danger zone on the inside of aircraft fuselage?

#62
IIRC all our Brit C-130s have prop zone marks on the inside (stripes on the lining sheets). I certainly used to sit there looking at them, and contemplate what might happen if a prop blade came through.
Same here, were they not two thick red or yellow lines? The first time I sat opposite them I was naturally a bit concerned, but then it dawned on me that I'd rather it all ended quickly rather than than the horror of being in an uncontrollable nose dive, after that little epiphany everything was okay.
 
#63
United Airlines Flight 232 was a DC10 which threw its rear turbine, severing all three hydraulic systems. The crew got it down on the deck, unfortunately there were fatalities, but a number survived. The link shows the crew kept their composure and sense of humour as they tried to land the crippled aircraft.

The aircraft was not fitted with hydraulic fuses, which in the event of a pipe rupture stop any flow downstream.

United Airlines Flight 232 - Wikipedia

RP.
It was not until 35 minutes after the crash that rescuers identified the debris that was the remains of the cockpit, with the four pilots alive inside. All four recovered from their injuries and eventually returned to flight duty.
'kinell. Nerves of steel those guys.
 
#64
Must be. Why else would you want to throw yourself out of a perfectly good aircraft. 8O



I beg to differ. If you look at the bottom photo (the external shot) you will see that the emergency door is ahead of the line indicating the propeller arc. The red markings internally are just to let you know where that emergency hatch is. If you need further convincing, think about it for a minute and ask why would they place an emergency hatch in the arc of a propeller? :???:
Actually some markings inside US C130's state Danger Propellor in line with the hatch and also at the forward port door which is a fair distance from the props. Bear in mind the picture that i had to find off the internet at stupid-oclock on the morning was a C130 J and if i remember i was in a H which, and i will stand corrected has the hatches in different positions. Not wanting to get into a pissing contest and i will stand corrected on your comment.
 
#65
...I flew parachuting flights in 182s, 206s and Airvans and I am firmly convinced that all parachutist are howlers.
The attention whore types tend to be problem children showing off. The grumpy old cunts there for the beer and the craic with the odd plummet thrown in are generally sound.
 
#66
I flew parachuting flights in 182s, 206s and Airvans and I am firmly convinced that all parachutist are howlers :)
Don't knock it till you've tried it! However I must admit in some cases you are right.

Must be. Why else would you want to throw yourself out of a perfectly good aircraft. 8O
You do realise that 75% of all accidents occur during the landing and approach, therefore by jumping out you avoid the risky bit, simples.
 
#67
A friend of mine worked on the C207 and similar in Northern Canada; the 207 was known as the "crowd-killer" as they were often used to fly local indigenous around, many of whom liked a sup or whisky or two and several crashed from being overloaded, out of trim or because, in one case, a drunken local grabbed the control column and tried to fly the aircraft, which didnt work out well. The Metroliner was known as the "Texas death Sled"..........I flew parachuting flights in 182s, 206s and Airvans and I am firmly convinced that all parachutist are howlers :)
The biggest problem with the native folk is their ability to become bored extremely fast and turn into children who are destructive. They tend to pick at, carve in, or just pull apart any aircraft interior parts that are within reaching distance of their seat. If they are in Beavers or Twotters the quilted sidewalls look like they’ve had rats burrowing through them to the point you can see the inner skin.
Metroliners flown by Perimeter and Bearskin are/were pretty heavily modded for work in northern Canada and very reliable, not maintenance friendly, but reliable.
 
#69
The attention whore types tend to be problem children showing off. The grumpy old cunts there for the beer and the craic with the odd plummet thrown in are generally sound.
quite true...I had one genius who liked to edge out past the strut and flip his legs around the leading edge of the wing and hang there. Quite an impressive stunt but the resultant drag yawed the poor old Cessna quite a bit until the Jumpmaster said that I should wiggle the controls and shake him off. This worked....on the ground, he was invited to quit this behaviour or leave. He got quite frothy about being told off until his mates got around him and got him to cop on.....I had another beaut who tried to steal the ignition key; this was a well-known trick on new pilots, so we always had a spare key on board, despite the jumpers being warned about the engine getting shock-cooled from a sudden shut-down. When the idiot reached past me for the key, I punched him away and his mates hoofed him out and jumped after him. He was off the site inside the hour.............the old sweats? they want a good "spot" by the pilot and no messing in the cabin. Respect works both ways.
 
#70
#72
quite true...I had one genius who liked to edge out past the strut and flip his legs around the leading edge of the wing and hang there. Quite an impressive stunt but the resultant drag yawed the poor old Cessna quite a bit until the Jumpmaster said that I should wiggle the controls and shake him off. This worked....on the ground, he was invited to quit this behaviour or leave. He got quite frothy about being told off until his mates got around him and got him to cop on.....I had another beaut who tried to steal the ignition key; this was a well-known trick on new pilots, so we always had a spare key on board, despite the jumpers being warned about the engine getting shock-cooled from a sudden shut-down. When the idiot reached past me for the key, I punched him away and his mates hoofed him out and jumped after him. He was off the site inside the hour.............the old sweats? they want a good "spot" by the pilot and no messing in the cabin. Respect works both ways.
A mate had that happen to him. Ex para with an evil sense of humour. Grinned sheepishly and drank his beer but kept an eye on them and bided his time. Few weeks later he had the same clown show on board and in those days the skygods would unhook the belly wart reserve and stick it behind them to lean against in a casual manner.

Anyhow, all aboard exuding coolth as was their won't, reserves not attached, when Stropkins bimbled gently out over a field of aloe at around a thousand feet and began fiddling with the mixture, causing a couple of loud barks and some rough running from the donk. The skygods didn't like this one bit and went out the door like greased weasel shit sans belly warts. Stropkins reckoned he felt the aircraft lurch and looked over his shoulder to see four reserves laying there, owners AWOL.

Anyhow, low level over an aloe farm under a round canopy is not a good place to be. Our heroes landed safely, albeit with some pain from the aloes but by the time they'd dragged themselves and their gear back to the field they were a bloody mess and their gear was in tatters.

Stropkins just smiled knowingly next time he saw them on a load.
 

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