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GLESGA-NED

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That's what I like to see, A Relay OP in a foreign country, on a hill making a bar!!

"If you weren't there man, you weren't there".

Something much better than anything I would try in my back yard, good drills man.
 
@Flaggie - er yes, you can cut down the centre of a sheet. And it a bit more. Its maximum rip width is 41 inches. Crosscut is 29". My saw is called a "longarm" RAS for obvious reasons. As Slime says though, it's farking heavy. I just checked the specs, 740lbs. I find myself doing what generations of house builders did before me - leave the body of the saw on site, and take the motor carriage off the arm and take it home.
Reckon I might well have gone for the radial arm saw if I'd done a bit more research a few years back when I bought my mitre saw, though it would have had to be a touch lighter -- we've been building our own house (part of it) for several years now, and although we don't need to hop in and out of vans, it is handy to be able to move both saws to somewhere close to where we're working.

We deliberately stick to 2x8 sheets of OSB, precisely to make handling easier -- ripping those on the table saw is no problem. Could do with building myself a mobile receiving table for the table saw though. But it's easy to get sidetracked into building "useful" bits of equipment for the job, rather than just getting on with the job itself :)
 
That's what I like to see, A Relay OP in a foreign country, on a hill making a bar!!

"If you weren't there man, you weren't there".

Something much better than anything I would try in my back yard, good drills man.
Thank you for the lovely compliment about my efforts.

However. I AIN'T NO FCUKING RADIO DELAY OPERATOR :)

RTG retraded to Tech. So no stranger to the back of a RR det, but you can stick your red tabs up your SCAM 12!
 
Reckon I might well have gone for the radial arm saw if I'd done a bit more research a few years back when I bought my mitre saw, though it would have had to be a touch lighter -- we've been building our own house (part of it) for several years now, and although we don't need to hop in and out of vans, it is handy to be able to move both saws to somewhere close to where we're working.

We deliberately stick to 2x8 sheets of OSB, precisely to make handling easier -- ripping those on the table saw is no problem. Could do with building myself a mobile receiving table for the table saw though. But it's easy to get sidetracked into building "useful" bits of equipment for the job, rather than just getting on with the job itself :)
You'd actually have a problem buying one these days.

There are two kinds really. There's the homeowner ones, I think Sears in the US still sells them, but they are made out of toffee. Aluminum arms, weedy little motors, not much capacity (about 13" cross cut, and maybe 24" rip). Then there's the cast iron industrial behemoths like mine. The list price on mine was $6,000. I got it used, including a $250 12" dado set, a $250 3 phase converter and a couple of blades (>$100 each). I paid $400.

I had to put new carriage bearings in it, which by a quirk of good fortune I got for free but would otherwise have been about $200. The bearings were "dues out" from all the normal parts suppliers, so I called the saw manufacturer, and asked what gives. By chance, they had a new shipment in that day, and were well aware that they were overdue. Despite the saw being 20 years old at the time, they shipped me a set for free "under warranty". God loves Delta Power Equipment Corporation!

You can still buy industrial RASs from the Original Saw Co, but they are just as expensive as my Delta would have been new.

Radial Arm Saw

These are based on 1950s DeWalt designs. By DeWalt, I mean the original company, not the Black & Decker brand of today.

If you want a good RAS, get a used cast iron one from the 60s. Then update it with new bearings as required. They'll last! From the 70s onwards, they started to be "cost reduced", ending up with the God-awful Sears ones of the last 30 years or so.
 
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G

GLESGA-NED

Guest
That's what I like to see, A Relay OP in a foreign country, on a hill making a bar!! "If weren't there man, you weren't there".

Something much better than anything I would try in my back yard, good drills man. Or should I say my missus would let me build.
Thank you for the lovely compliment about my efforts.

However. I AIN'T NO FCUKING RADIO DELAY OPERATOR :)

RTG retraded to Tech. So no stranger to the back of a RR det, but you can stick your red tabs up your SCAM 12!
My respect that was never there for you has truly gone, I've been tricked, by a tech, I feel nauseous, violated!

Still great project though, keep it up.;)
 
You'd actually have a problem buying one these days.

There are two kinds really. There's the homeowner ones, I think Sears in the US still sells them, but they are made out of toffee. Aluminum arms, weedy little motors, not much capacity (about 13" cross cut, and maybe 24" rip). Then there's the cast iron industrial behemoths like mine. The list price on mine was $6,000. I got it used, including a $250 12" dado set, a $250 3 phase converter and a couple of blades (>$100 each). I paid $400.

I had to put new carriage bearings in it, which by a quirk of good fortune I got for free but would otherwise have been about $200. The bearings were "dues out" from all the normal parts suppliers, so I called the saw manufacturer, and asked what gives. By chance, they had a new shipment in that day, and were well aware that they were overdue. Despite the saw being 20 years old at the time, they shipped me a set for free "under warranty". God loves Delta Power Equipment Corporation!

You can still buy industrial RASs from the Original Saw Co, but they are just as expensive as my Delta would have been new.

Radial Arm Saw

These are based on 1950s DeWalt designs. By DeWalt, I mean the original company, not the Black & Decker brand of today.

If you want a good RAS, get a used cast iron one from the 60s. Then update it with new bearings as required. They'll last! From the 70s onwards, they started to be "cost reduced", ending up with the God-awful Sears ones of the last 30 years or so.
Also require a crane, or at least a forklift!
 
Bit of a progress report on the shed. This summer's been pretty much the hottest on record, well over 100F for 8 weeks or more, so got sod all done. Job's been in flux too. Anyhoo, the heat's broken and I have a window before it gets wet and cold; four proper seasons here.

I made a start on sheathing the roof, and about shit myself. I just don't do heights. Not with an 8 x 4 sheet of OSB in my mitts at any rate. So I thought bollocks to it and hired a roofer. He had the sheathing and the shingling done in two days, versus 3 months of swearing from me. Lesson learned. In progress:

IMG_4330 2.jpg


Job done, and my new best friend Vaughn in the pic:

IMG_4340.jpg
 
Having got the roof up, I then looked at siding it. Praise be, I found a guy that makes a business out of buying the garbage from sawmills. Except the garbage is actually inch thick maple that might have a few booboos in it. He sells it for $350 for 1000 bd ft plus $50 delivery. Would you do two bundles for $700 delivered? Yup.

Make it so:

IMG_4345.jpg


IMG_4346.jpg


So now I have the surface area equivalent of 60 -odd sheets of plywood for $700. Except it's inch thick solid maple hardwood. I'll need about a third to a half of this to side, line, floor and ceiling the shed. It's green, so I'll need to sticker and dry it before I can floor, ceiling and line the interior, but the siding will be fine in green.

Leaving a good year or two of woodworking projects with hard maple to play with. Result!
 
It’s only taken about 4 1/2 years, but we’re pretty much there. Between the wife and I, five job changes, one child through university, two more in process, three more to come, three house moves, a mini stroke, appendicitis, two rounds of minor surgery, a parental death, family dog died, and building a house, it’s kind of been on the back burner. Not to mention @supermatelot being a dîck :)

Still need to adjust the garage door, build the steps and ramp to the garage door.

5FDAC96D-98E2-48F7-B529-B497E72D43BB.jpeg


And paint it:

C9C3726D-6C6C-43E3-83AB-570F29320A67.jpeg


Mason & Dixon seem to enjoy us being out there working on it:

226DB749-4283-4625-B76D-C8A2808E7007.jpeg


Lucky bastards will get a doghouse out of the offcuts.
 
Those dogs, you need to draw a line....


Taxi?...I’m already bloody in it!
 
@Roadster280

Good job.

A couple of questions:

1. Is the roof style some sort of local custom. It looks like a Cloggie gambrel roof with a wider flare at the base. Or did you just make it up.

2. Why did you paint it? As it is 100% solid maple why not just varnish it to show off the wood. I have always been insanely jealous of the use of wood in American architecture and interior design, especially in the Prairie School and the American interpretation of the British Arts and Crafts Movement.

Being a saddo my favourite porn subscription is :

And if you are looking for projects for your leftover wood the April edition recommends this:

The second link might be a granny/eggs thang.
 
@Roadster280

Good job.

A couple of questions:

1. Is the roof style some sort of local custom. It looks like a Cloggie gambrel roof with a wider flare at the base. Or did you just make it up.

2. Why did you paint it? As it is 100% solid maple why not just varnish it to show off the wood. I have always been insanely jealous of the use of wood in American architecture and interior design, especially in the Prairie School and the American interpretation of the British Arts and Crafts Movement.

Being a saddo my favourite porn subscription is :

And if you are looking for projects for your leftover wood the April edition recommends this:

The second link might be a granny/eggs thang.
Yes, it’s a local custom, and is indeed a Gambrel roof. Lots and lots of barns round here with that style. I did indeed make up the dimensions however. It wasn’t until this weekend that I finally got a good impression of how it would turn out; sometimes Gambrel buildings get the proportions and angles wrong. This one’s not too bad; I could maybe have made the overhangs a couple inches less. Overall very pleased with it.

The maple turned out to be a red herring. It was far too wet to use immediately, but had some fungus and rot cells in the core of both piles that I was unaware of. By the time it dried out a bit, a good percentage of it had rotted. I ended up giving most of it away In the end. A shame, but lesson learned. It would possibly have been ok if I had been able to sticker it in a dry area, but didn’t have one available. Of course I do now :)

The siding is concrete fiberboard. This is a concrete product, and works similar to wood, but will never rot. It’s similar to the old asbestos sheeting of the mid 20th century, but hopefully no asbestos! It’s not actually painted at present, that’s the natural colour. We do need to caulk the joints and paint it, but I’m just relieved to have it built right now. The main house is sided with the same stuff, so it matches. Or will, when painted the same.
 
I think it's what's called a Dutch Barn.
It IS a Dutch-style barn, but they’re commonly called Gambrels round here. Not many Dutch/Amish round here. There are some, but not many. The style of barn is commonplace, however. Main advantage is increased attic headroom vs a straightforward pitched roof. I didn’t intend the attic as anything other than storage, but having enough headroom (6’ at the ridge, 5’ at the minor ridges) means it’s quite usable. Took me forever to decide on the proportions, didn’t want it too large/dominant or small/useless. The roof dimensions (inc height) flow from the footprint dimensions, so it was a bit of a balancing act between dominance and utility.
 
What a pity about the wood.

In terms of the overhang you are a mere novice in terms of Tennessee gambrel overhangs.

barn.jpg

Rutledge, TN.
 
Rutledge not that far from me, about 25 miles straight north. That barn exemplifies what I was saying about angle variation. The initial slopes are damned near vertical, with a much less pronounced slope on the upper slopes. Mine are equal angles - no intention of using the attic, where that one is a clear two-storey.

Looks like that one also has an extended prow at the very top of the eave, these usually have a big beam on the ridge with a block & tackle for lifting heavy shit to the end door on the second floor. Very commonly seen in the Netherlands, even in city buildings.

If the barn is big enough, then it does indeed allow for big overhangs. I just didn’t want a monstrous barn right in front of the house. Anything much bigger would have looked ridiculous. A complicating factor was that the house plan and final location wasn’t known when we started the shed, it was just for storing tools in to work on clearing the land, with a vague idea of where the house would be. The upper photo in post 49 above was taken from a similar position to this one I took a couple minutes ago. To say the least, it looks completely different!

5E5B5C74-9C9E-4B1F-B4C3-56E0554DB7EA.jpeg
 
I was just considering what building that in the UK would take.

Planning permission would put a year on the build then you need an environmental assessment to ensure you didn't disturb any newts or lesser spotted dandelions. There'd be the inspections by the building reg man to ensure it was built to the right spec and complied with insulation and energy conservation rules.
You'd probably just about have the foundations down in 4.5 years.

It looks nice, a job well done. Is that your house facing it?
 
I was just considering what building that in the UK would take.

Planning permission would put a year on the build then you need an environmental assessment to ensure you didn't disturb any newts or lesser spotted dandelions. There'd be the inspections by the building reg man to ensure it was built to the right spec and complied with insulation and energy conservation rules.
You'd probably just about have the foundations down in 4.5 years.

It looks nice, a job well done. Is that your house facing it?
Yes, that’s the house. The shed is not insulated at all. Not sure I ever will, I don’t plan on spending hours in there at a time. It’d be $500 to insulate it, another $700 or so to put a wallmount heater/cooler in there, just don’t think I can justify that. But who knows? I‘ll probably line the interior without insulating it, then realise I should have insulated it in 5-10 years time. Can’t have everything though :)
 

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