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The cloth shoulder titles were introduced when the drill manual for the L85 was written!
The old plastic/staybrite items that used to be worn on the epaulets broke off when the rifles were shouldered! sloped (Stonkernote: correction to spare the blood pressure of the small-minded foot-drill-fascisti :thumleft: )
That musta been a close-run thing: what if the Foot Guards had really stood their ground?

Another forty years of knackered FALs?

Back to polishing brass shoulder titles?

Who can say!!!???
 
That musta been a close-run thing: what if the Foot Guards had really stood their ground?

Another forty years of knackered FALs?

Back to polishing brass shoulder titles?

Who can say!!!???

I do recall from my days at MoD there was some serious discussion of the retention of a number of L1A1 for ceremonial purposes.
 
Left actually Alec.

Hmmmnn...........I don't have any trade photos close to hand. I seem to recall that I wore my trade, PTI badge on the right arm just above the elbow with the 'lightbulb' lower down above the cuff. The latter was removed when some of us returned to qualify as PJI's.
I am now confused. It was a long time ago, 1967 and I was virry, virry drunk :)
 

Owly

Swinger
Hmmmnn...........I don't have any trade photos close to hand. I seem to recall that I wore my trade, PTI badge on the right arm just above the elbow with the 'lightbulb' lower down above the cuff. The latter was removed when some of us returned to qualify as PJI's.
I am now confused. It was a long time ago, 1967 and I was virry, virry drunk :)
Could have been the case in 67(?) but it was certainly left in my Army days 72-95.
 

Owly

Swinger
To qualify for the para badge without wings - 'light bulb' in my early Army days, a soldier had to pass P Coy as well as the full jumps course (BPC) in Abingdon. The only difference was whether one went on to serve in an airborne unit i. e.on the posted strength of a unit in which you could be ordered to drop by parachute. In which case, once posted, off with the ' light bulb' and on with the wings. There was and still is absolutely no difference in initial training and qualification which is still the case today. However, for some years now it has been almost impossible to get on a parachute course unless you are going to a para PID which would result in the wearing of wings anyway. This explains why you probably won't see the light bulb being worn in this day and age but it is still referred to in AGAIs. The Parachute Badge (with or without wings) is only awarded for completing pre-para selection (or an equivalent arduous course such as the hills phase of SF selection or the All Arms Commando course) and the BPC or by completing a parachute drop on operations against the enemy. It is not awarded for any type of AT course. Once awarded, the para badge (with or without wings) may be worn in perpetuity.
 
To qualify for the para badge without wings - 'light bulb' in my early Army days, a soldier had to pass P Coy as well as the full jumps course
Put dates on your army service, if you would, please.

Lightbulb didn't need P Company in the mid 1970s, nor - I suspect - a long time before that.

If ever, but I stand ready to be corrected on that.

Be aware that I'm asking as a skilled parachutist (to basic, unskilled military jumpers a "cissy sport skydiver") with no axe to grind about badges :wink:
 
Light Bulb aka the "Edward Bear" badge.
There used to be an opportunity for O/Cdts to do an abbreviated parachute experience course, but this stopped when the commissioning course was shortened. Edward - a child's teddy bear - was the mascot, passed on from course to course. He was carried by one of the stick and then released with his own parachute.
Not quite sure where Edward came from, but he had a special uniform made, including smock and blue beret. I last saw him in a glass display case in Old College three or four years ago.
 
Borrowed this from the IWM website. It deals with the WW2 Light Bulb parachutist badge.

Known colloquially as "the light bulb". This badge is not limited to those in the Parachute Regiment. It is a skill-at-arms badge worn to denote personnel who have passed through a Parachute Training School (four training jumps) but are not regular parachute troops or instructors, and have not been called for operational duties. The badge was approved in ACI 1274/1942, at which time it was to have been worn on the lower right arm. ACI 995/1948 clarified the qualification as being for those with parachute training but not eligible for the award of parachute wings. It also moved the badge from the right to the lower eft arm, although it seems it may have been worn on the left since 1944. The badge also exists in metal.

Probably useless info, but I thought I'd post it anyway.
 
To qualify for the para badge without wings - 'light bulb' in my early Army days, a soldier had to pass P Coy as well as the full jumps course (BPC) in Abingdon. The only difference was whether one went on to serve in an airborne unit i. e.on the posted strength of a unit in which you could be ordered to drop by parachute. In which case, once posted, off with the ' light bulb' and on with the wings. There was and still is absolutely no difference in initial training and qualification which is still the case today. However, for some years now it has been almost impossible to get on a parachute course unless you are going to a para PID which would result in the wearing of wings anyway. This explains why you probably won't see the light bulb being worn in this day and age but it is still referred to in AGAIs. The Parachute Badge (with or without wings) is only awarded for completing pre-para selection (or an equivalent arduous course such as the hills phase of SF selection or the All Arms Commando course) and the BPC or by completing a parachute drop on operations against the enemy. It is not awarded for any type of AT course. Once awarded, the para badge (with or without wings) may be worn in perpetuity.
By the army's way of thinking then, soldiers from 7 Para RHA or 23 Parachute Engineer Regiment move to 29 Commando RA or 24 Engineer Regiment should not need to complete AACC as they have already completed an arduous course in completing All Arms P Company?

Once upon a time, many moons ago, in a universe far away, they would have had to complete the relevant arduous course. 148 Bty RA and Recce Tp 59 Cdo RE had to complete AACC then AAPC if they were not already parachute trained.
 
Would take someone with a brass neck to pull up a P Coy qualified person wearing wings but hadn't served with 5/16 AB. IIRC the QM of Troops Aldergrove circa 1995 wore the lightbulb. The one and only time I ever saw one.
 
We had a Staffie in our Cav Regt who wore the light bulb. This was late 80's, so he probably earned it mid-70's.
I never asked him about it, but was once told that he completed P-Company & the jumps course to join the RAC Para Sqn, but it disbanded before he got chance to go on strength to qualify for full wings.

I've no idea if it's true or not.

@ste14w I'm talking about D Sqn SQMS SSgt Bob F*****, any idea?
 
Light Bulb aka the "Edward Bear" badge.
There used to be an opportunity for O/Cdts to do an abbreviated parachute experience course, but this stopped when the commissioning course was shortened. Edward - a child's teddy bear - was the mascot, passed on from course to course. He was carried by one of the stick and then released with his own parachute.
Not quite sure where Edward came from, but he had a special uniform made, including smock and blue beret. I last saw him in a glass display case in Old College three or four years ago.

I've instructed on a few of those courses. There is no connection between the 'Light Bulb' badge and the Edward Bear course. The students however received an 'Edward Bear tie ' and a certificate. The tie was green with a logo of teddy bears on the end of parachutes embossed.

No1 PTS referred to these as a DCI (Defence Council Instruction )courses. RAF Cranwell had their variation of this for their aircrew candidates. Prince Charles undertook one of these 4 jump courses in 1969.
 
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