Private Bainbridge IED

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Biscuits_AB

Guest
#2
There's not a lot that you can say apart from that series of photos shows the reality of their situation out there. A picture speaks a thousand words. As for the lad, judging by the photos of him in hospital, he looks resolute, determined and the sort of bloke who will be up dancing at the earliest opportunity if not before, and I don't think that he'll let his disability hold him back.
 
S

swampmonster

Guest
#7
I know the officer in charge of that patrol...Good bloke, has a lot of time for his Lads.
 
#8
I hope is recovery is speedy.

Just one point from the article, since when has the Defence Medical Rehab Centre (DMRC) at Headly Court been an RAF Hospital? Typical journos not checking their facts.
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#10
I hope is recovery is speedy.

Just one point from the article, since when has the Defence Medical Rehab Centre (DMRC) at Headly Court been an RAF Hospital? Typical journos not checking their facts.
The big RAF badge might be a give away but for your education:




DMRC ORGANISATION

Headley Court albeit a part of the Defence Medical Education and Training Agency still remains under the administrative umbrella of The Royal Air Force however, the command of the unit can be either Army or RAF on a rotational basis. Within the structure of DMRC are medical & rehabilitation divisions that cater for the needs of patients, a training and research element to improve military rehabilitation needs and a support division that is solely responsible for the smooth running of the unit.
 

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#11
I have seen a young lad with two artifical legs (from the knees down) jogging around Shrewsbury recently. I am led to believe that he is an Afghan veteran. I am constantly amazed by the attitude of these guys - it makes me feel a bit ashamed when I complain to the wife that my arthritis is playing up. I really haven't got anything to whinge about.

I have the utmost resepect for these lads. The way they pick themselves up and get on with life is nothing short of astounding. Best wishes to them all.

Rodney2q
 
#12
I hope is recovery is speedy.

Just one point from the article, since when has the Defence Medical Rehab Centre (DMRC) at Headly Court been an RAF Hospital? Typical journos not checking their facts.
Doc Oc tells me that it was originally commissioned as 'RAF Headley Court' in 1949, having been gifted to the nation as a hospital for Aircrew by the Chartered Institute of Surveyors....up to about 1991 officers went to Headley and other ranks to JSMU Chessington, down the road.....under Options for Change, Chessington was sold off and
the former RAF Headley Court became tri-Service DMRC.

As anyone who has been there will tell you, it remains a light blue establishment in it's heart of hearts...current CO is also RAF , a Group Captain .

( This can be a bit of an irritation to Army COs who think a PR visit to the Army's Rehab Centre can be arranged with a phone call by one's MA....)

PS further to Bokka's post above, that's from an old website....DMETA folded into Joint Medical Command (JMC) in 2008. About to change again so I'm told.
 
#15
Doc Oc tells me that it was originally commissioned as 'RAF Headley Court' in 1949, having been gifted to the nation as a hospital for Aircrew by the Chartered Institute of Surveyors....up to about 1991 officers went to Headley and other ranks to JSMU Chessington, down the road.....under Options for Change, Chessington was sold off and
the former RAF Headley Court became tri-Service DMRC.

As anyone who has been there will tell you, it remains a light blue establishment in it's heart of hearts...current CO is also RAF , a Group Captain .

( This can be a bit of an irritation to Army COs who think a PR visit to the Army's Rehab Centre can be arranged with a phone call by one's MA....)

PS further to Bokka's post above, that's from an old website....DMETA folded into Joint Medical Command (JMC) in 2008. About to change again so I'm told.

Think that it was a little earlier than 1991 that OR's were at Headley Court, I was there in 86 and all ranks were accommodated and rehabilitated at Headley Court, as you approached the end of your rehabilitation and became designated a "late" you were taken to Chessington whatever your rank and problem.

Very much an RAF outfit though with Battle of Britain day being regarded as a day of celebration.

Hope they are doing as good a job now as they were then, sadly they have far more patients to help though.
 
#16
Good lad. That's truly inspirational.
 
#17
Article was in the Sunday sport 'news' paper today. hopefully a bit more public awareness. Plucky lad


THE PUB*LIC SHOULD KNOW THE HOR*RORS TROOPS FACE
By SI*MON DEAN si*mon@sun*daysport.co.uk
Sunday Sport
8 april 2012

A SOLDIER crippled by a Taliban bomb has told how he WANTED these shocking pictures of his horrific injuries printed – to expose the terrible price paid by our troops in battle.
Private Stephen Bainbridge lost both legs after being caught in the blast from an IED while on patrol in Afghanistan.
The dramatic aftermath of the explosion, showing his comrades giving him first aid, was captured by a photographer embedded with the unit.
Defence bosses did not want the photos published but the 25- year- old insisted that the truth should not be covered up.
Stephen, who only joined the Army last October and was on his first tour of Afghanistan, said: “The public should get to know everything about the horror faced by our troops over there.
“They should be shown more of this and told the truth – there are a lot of things they don’t know.”
This is the first time in the 10- year campaign that pictures showing the immediate aftermath of an improvised explosive device attack on a British soldier have been published.
Stephen’s Black Watch unit had been dropped off on Remembrance Day last year to clear the area of Taliban insurgents.
Their mission was to check a series of enemy compounds but as they entered one they felt something was wrong and called forward Pte John Cameron, 21, to use his mine detector to sweep a doorway.
He decided it was safe and pushed on followed by several others.
The IED exploded as Stephen went through.
Stephen, from Kirkcaldy, Fife, said: “I was blown into the air, I felt the heat blast.
“As I was coming back down, it didn’t feel like I was falling, more like floating. That was until I hit the ground.”
Unit commander, 2nd Lt Robert Weir, said: “I was hit by a wave of sound and debris.
Silly
“It seemed to be moving in slow motion. I got launched a few metres and landed on my back.
“For an instant I thought maybe no one was injured but then thought that was silly because these things don’t just go off.
“I saw Bainbridge lying just inside the doorway.
“One of his legs was missing, his hand was very swollen and he was missing the tip of one of his fingers.
“I saw the other leg was definitely damaged but it was still there at that point. I called for a medic and then started giving my initial first aid.
“When I got up to Bainbridge I had never seen anything like it in my life.

Part of me thought, ‘ Good Lord, what am I going to do here?’”
Stephen’s life was saved by the squad’s medic, Corporal John Goode, 21, who had never dealt with a battlefield casualty before.
He ordered Lt Weir to apply pressure to the arteries in his legs and tied tourniquets to them until a Chinook rescue helicopter arrived. He regained consciousness nine days later.
Stephen said: “Before I woke up, I pretty much knew the legs were gone.
“I suppose I was conscious of the doctors talking.
“It still hit me when I woke up but not as badly as if I believed I was still all there. It wasn’t a pretty sight.”
Stephen is now receiving fulltime treatment at Headley Court military hospital in Surrey.
The graphic images were captured by war photographer Jason P. Howe – who stepped on the IED seconds before Stephen but did not set it off.
Reluctant
Jason, 40, from Ipswich, Suffolk, said: “I have had a lot of sleepless nights about these images. They are the first to show graphic images of a British casualty since the Falklands war.
“The MOD were reluctant to have them published but they are too important not to be seen.
“The attack happened in November and it has taken this long to get them published.
“I visited Stephen at Headley Court and he gave consent for the pictures to appear.”
A senior Army source said: “We did not want one particular photo where Private Bainbridge is lying on the ground to be used.
“If someone was in a doctor’s surgery receiving treatment, you couldn’t just take a picture and publish it.
“He gave his consent but it was not his call and there are strict procedures that the journalist should have adhered to.”
 
#18
I am still staggered and humbled by what these lads and lasses do these days. I did 24 years; 3 tours of NI, Bos and Gulf War II but nothing like what they are being asked to do and do again and again. Sadly, we'll continue to see sights like this but equally I'm convinced we'll continue see the raw quality of those we have serving today. God bless fella and good luck.
 
#19
The photo's show an unvarnished account of how it is and that is how it should be.

Young men and women who serve must not be denied the diginity of their choice to do so.
 
#20
Impressive response by the members of Pvt Bainbridge's squad. Best wishes for a speedy recovery.

I am a septic type and am also very impressed with the quality of the reconstructive surgery and rehabilitation on both sides of the pond. Amazing advances in recent years. Very sorry that there is a need for this but happy new resources are available to doctors now.
 

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