Priti Patel the new Home Sec wants to hang crims, lots of them.

Just heard on R4 PM programme.
A reporter interviewed a Kurd at the camp in Calais, who said he knew several of those drowned in the Channel this week, but had only met them in Calais.
He was asked about the people smugglers and how much was being charged for a passage: £ thousands per person.
Asked whether he had that sort of cash, he replied ‘Yes. I have been working in Germany for four years’.
ETA: I would humbly suggest this response raises a few questions, not least of which is if he has been working in Germany for years, what the hell is he doing in a refugee camp waiting to make a perilous trip across the Channel?
 
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Just heard on R4 PM programme.
A reporter interviewed a Kurd at the camp in Calais, who said he knew several of those drowned in the Channel this week, but had only met them in Calais.
He was asked about the people smugglers and how much was being charged for a passage: £ thousands per person.
Asked whether he had that sort of cash, he replied ‘Yes. I have been working in Germany for four years’.

I'm guessing the clue in that interview will be too microscopic for the wuckfits having lip wobbles about the poor ickle refugees handout shoppers fleeing their war torn countries to detect.
 

clanky

War Hero
interesting point from the beeb website....

Police say the boats are often specially commissioned - long and basic inflatable craft, built to hold as many people as possible. Their simple structure makes them especially dangerous. Separating inflatable vessels into compartments would help limit any damage and loss of air if the shell was punctured. And smugglers often don't bother, either, to reinforce the bottom of the boat with solid boards, meaning that the boats crumple when deflated, as one French minister said, like "a child's paddling pool".

If this is true there's one easy way of stopping the trade.
 
Just heard on R4 PM programme.
A reporter interviewed a Kurd at the camp in Calais, who said he knew several of those drowned in the Channel this week, but had only met them in Calais.
He was asked about the people smugglers and how much was being charged for a passage: £ thousands per person.
Asked whether he had that sort of cash, he replied ‘Yes. I have been working in Germany for four years’.
ETA: I would humbly suggest this response raises a few questions, not least of which is if he has been working in Germany for years, what the hell is he doing in a refugee camp waiting to make a perilous trip across the Channel?
Exactly!
People say they have mates, family (no matter how remote) here, but tough!
Unfortunately the smugglers spread rumours of returns & crackdowns, free house & citizenship in 5 years, return home with rent coming in, free NHS for life.
Guardian had a very short (waste of time) piece, the Kurdish male said he was coming to the UK, as there was 'nothing at home'. Despite it being a safe 'cultural hub' city that people travel to for festivals & tourism...in the safe Kurdish area.
 

endure

GCM
There was a short article in the Times today where an immigrant refused to board the dinghy the smugglers had lined up for him because the sea was so rough. This meant that they wouldn't collect their second payment (apparently they collect 50% up front and 50% when you arrive in the UK) so they shot him twice in the leg. He was carted off to hospital by the local emergency services.
 
There was a short article in the Times today where an immigrant refused to board the dinghy the smugglers had lined up for him because the sea was so rough. This meant that they wouldn't collect their second payment (apparently they collect 50% up front and 50% when you arrive in the UK) so they shot him twice in the leg. He was carted off to hospital by the local emergency services.
Heard/read similar a couple of weeks back. But also that current 'fares' are cheaper because of both the weather & the drownings..
 

endure

GCM
Surely if these migrants claim asylum anywhere in Europe, they could then legally travel to UK for a fraction of the price on a normal ferry?
You need to be an EU citizen with a passport to enter the UK. Contrary to popular belief just turning up doesn't get you a passport anywhere in Europe. In Italy you need to be a legal resident for 10 years before you're allowed to apply for citizenship. In Germany 8 years and in France 5.
 
interesting point from the beeb website....

Police say the boats are often specially commissioned - long and basic inflatable craft, built to hold as many people as possible. Their simple structure makes them especially dangerous. Separating inflatable vessels into compartments would help limit any damage and loss of air if the shell was punctured. And smugglers often don't bother, either, to reinforce the bottom of the boat with solid boards, meaning that the boats crumple when deflated, as one French minister said, like "a child's paddling pool".

If this is true there's one easy way of stopping the trade.
Amid all the recent brouhaha, I appear to have missed any mention of French LE enacting not only national navigation laws, but also EU laws, regarding vessel construction, security at sea, registration, skipper’s quals/certification, and many other things.
All these give LE, not only the right, but the duty to prevent vessels putting out to sea.
I wonder whether this element was discussed in Calais, today. I fear not though.
 
Just heard on R4 PM programme.
A reporter interviewed a Kurd at the camp in Calais, who said he knew several of those drowned in the Channel this week, but had only met them in Calais.
He was asked about the people smugglers and how much was being charged for a passage: £ thousands per person.
Asked whether he had that sort of cash, he replied ‘Yes. I have been working in Germany for four years’.
ETA: I would humbly suggest this response raises a few questions, not least of which is if he has been working in Germany for years, what the hell is he doing in a refugee camp waiting to make a perilous trip across the Channel?
Unfortunately, the Kurds are seen in the West as doughty, loveable 'good' Arabs who everyone gives a hard time to (akin, perhaps, to Gurkhas). In reality, the Kurds are a very loose federation of tribes stretching from Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey and Azerbaijan. And it would be fair to say, none of these countries have ever liked them. But the Kurdish Autonomous Region (please, not 'Kurdistan') in Northern Iraq is a pretty safe and prosperous area, with the Turkish-trained Peshmerga doing a pretty good job of keeping IS under control - with a lot of help from the West. It's not exactly a liberal democracy, but compared with neighbouring areas, it's pretty good.

The SDF - who fought IS in Syria - are dominated by Kurdish leadership and have exploited the conflict to displace Arab communities from northern Syria, to establish Rojova, bolstered by vast amounts of US equipment that was lent to them to beat IS, and they have just forgotten to return. Unfortunately (and in spite of what you might think of the current regime in Turkey) these weapons are turning up in PKK attacks in Turkey, against police and security forces. As warned years ago by Turkey. The leadership of PKK and SDF is largely interchangeable.

The SDF have done a great job over the last few years building up an image of being good fighters (which they are), backed by Women's Brigades and being LGBTQ+ friendly etc. This is confection and clever PR; Kurds are typically Sunni and deeply conservative; in Turkey most Kurds still support Erdogan as he is pious, rather than supporting the Kurdish Liberal HDP. Let's also not forget that the PKK is still backed by Moscow and is a proscribed terrorist organisation across the world and probably responsible for upwards of 40,000 deaths since 1984. The Met are active against them, breaking up recruiting and financing cells in the UK.

A long way of saying that if someone claims to be a Kurd, be curious/suspicious.
 

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