Priti Patel the new Home Sec wants to hang crims, lots of them.

A guarded thumbs up for the Pikey Act depending on whether plod have the cojones to enforce it or not.

Plod doesn't have the numbers to enforce it.

HMG can pass all the laws they like.

Sadly, we cannot put out public order serials to clear the places.

(awaits 'but you can do it for......')
 
Plod doesn't have the numbers to enforce it.

HMG can pass all the laws they like.

Sadly, we cannot put out public order serials to clear the places.

(awaits 'but you can do it for......')
I think many of the long suffering public are aware of the shortage in police to deal with crime as we would hope and want (it's too much to suggest expect). I'm willing to pay more for policing, in fact I support a zero tolerance approach, cyclist on the pavement? Nicked! Littering? Nicked! Being a public nuisance? Nicked! However we have a considerable number of citizens who don't contribute by paying HMRC tax or council tax and policing takes oodles of cash.
 
Plod doesn't have the numbers to enforce it.

HMG can pass all the laws they like.

Sadly, we cannot put out public order serials to clear the places.

(awaits 'but you can do it for......')
Too busy painting your toe nails, making tictoc videos or strutting in your high heels, or ignoring crimes to keep the stats down....."Hello GMP :wave:".
Understood.
 
Plod doesn't have the numbers to enforce it.

HMG can pass all the laws they like.

Sadly, we cannot put out public order serials to clear the places.

(awaits 'but you can do it for......')
Considering my experiences last year when our lass had a number of serious mental health problems and I ended up having several rides in a police car while accompanying her to various hospitals, I came to the view that the police should be part funded by the NHS. Possibly an unfashionable view, but the time and resources that the police put in as the military wing of the the NHS seemed to be the only part of Dorsets mental health services that worked.
 

Slime

LE
Considering my experiences last year when our lass had a number of serious mental health problems and I ended up having several rides in a police car while accompanying her to various hospitals, I came to the view that the police should be part funded by the NHS. Possibly an unfashionable view, but the time and resources that the police put in as the military wing of the the NHS seemed to be the only part of Dorsets mental health services that worked.

My two penneth :)
No matter how much money the NHS could give the police it still wouldn’t solve the issue that the police aren’t remotely qualified to deal with mental health issues.

I’ve always thought that teaming health professionals with police is the best solution.

A car with a mental health specialist and a police officer would cover lots of bases.
One could deal with the mental health side, and have contacts within that sphere, the other could enforce the law if needed, and be able to take someone into custody if needed.

The above would be a bit like how the police and fire service cooperate for arson investigations or education.

For those used to asking for help from social services, the idea of a person on a shift, and who was unable to refuse to help on friday afternoon or the weekend would be a big plus imho.

In my own former job I found that far too often the mental health teams were far too happy to pass in proper channeled requests away from social services and on to police.
 
Considering my experiences last year when our lass had a number of serious mental health problems and I ended up having several rides in a police car while accompanying her to various hospitals, I came to the view that the police should be part funded by the NHS. Possibly an unfashionable view, but the time and resources that the police put in as the military wing of the the NHS seemed to be the only part of Dorsets mental health services that worked.

Last century I did weekends as an assistant in a two ward psych hospital, which I shall call "XYZ". When the usual (quite friendly) interactions with local police took place and we chatted over a coffee, it turned out they called their station lockup "XYZ-3" -- as in, hospital "XYZ" Ward 3, because it usually contained at least a couple of people who were regular 'clients' of the always-full hospital. The amount of time they had to use, tidying up after the over-stretched mental-health services was surprising.
 
Last century I did weekends as an assistant in a two ward psych hospital, which I shall call "XYZ". When the usual (quite friendly) interactions with local police took place and we chatted over a coffee, it turned out they called their station lockup "XYZ-3" -- as in, hospital "XYZ" Ward 3, because it usually contained at least a couple of people who were regular 'clients' of the always-full hospital. The amount of time they had to use, tidying up after the over-stretched mental-health services was surprising.
Last century I was more than grateful when 'plod' took the time and effort to encourage one of mine to 'help them with their inquiries.' I helped them by watching until the duty doc arrived. He was useless by admitting an illness was present but, "not enough to be sectioned." FFS.
 
Plod doesn't have the numbers to enforce it.

HMG can pass all the laws they like.

Sadly, we cannot put out public order serials to clear the places.

(awaits 'but you can do it for......')

As I suggested, it will be the lack of VSO political will to enforce the law that undermines this, not hanky-twisting about numbers.
 
I think many of the long suffering public are aware of the shortage in police to deal with crime as we would hope and want (it's too much to suggest expect). I'm willing to pay more for policing, in fact I support a zero tolerance approach, cyclist on the pavement? Nicked! Littering? Nicked! Being a public nuisance? Nicked! However we have a considerable number of citizens who don't contribute by paying HMRC tax or council tax and policing takes oodles of cash.

I wonder if a Financial Police might help?

I mean the cynic in me might suspect that it is in no-one's interest for in-depth financial investigations. That would end up in the City, and we don't want that. Do we?

:)
 
I wonder if a Financial Police might help?

I mean the cynic in me might suspect that it is in no-one's interest for in-depth financial investigations. That would end up in the City, and we don't want that. Do we?

:)
We already have the Financial Conduct Authority supported by the Serious Fraud Office, National Crime Agency and City of London police. Plus the industry body's own Credit Industry Fraud Avoidance System.

[sarcasm]
As the field is pretty crowded at the moment and we are so successful at prosecuting financial crime, I really don't think that another body is needed.
[/sarcasm]
 
We already have the Financial Conduct Authority supported by the Serious Fraud Office, National Crime Agency and City of London police. Plus the industry body's own Credit Industry Fraud Avoidance System.

[sarcasm]
As the field is pretty crowded at the moment and we are so successful at prosecuting financial crime, I really don't think that another body is needed.
[/sarcasm]
True!

[sarcasm]
And "Action Fraud" to ensure a first class investigation of fraud complaints from the public.
[sarcasm]
 
I wonder if a Financial Police might help?

I mean the cynic in me might suspect that it is in no-one's interest for in-depth financial investigations. That would end up in the City, and we don't want that. Do we?

:)
A friend of mine's dad was a high heid yin in a division of the French National Police that dealt solely with financial crimes under the instruction and oversight of a team of special magistrates.

He owned several houses and Laotian restaurants in Lyon's and Paris. He must have been very frugal with his money.
 

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