Prison, Ch 4 last night

#24
I liked the statement at the end where they highlighted that most of the prisoners were in for minor crimes to help fund their drug habits and weren’t in long enough to do anything about it.
This came across my desk the other day
https://www.centreforsocialjustice....ads/2018/06/CSJ-Desperate-for-a-fix-WEB-1.pdf
Heroin and crack cocaine, along with the recent explosion in New Psychoactive Substances, are not only blighting communities but drive as much as 50 per cent of all acquisitive crime, and 70 per cent of shop thefts.
Case study: Shop theft and crime causing the closure of a family-owned store

One small family retailer we spoke to described opening a store in the West Midlands. They found that crime was out of control in the area and report that it still is. The proprietor told us: “The level of ingrained criminality was such that it was necessary to recruit staff from outside the area in order to prevent employee theft, and that a significant proportion of the local community would just walk in and expect not to pay. “Each and every day significant quantities of stock would be lost, resulting in even more internal costs associated with daily stock-takes and related processes. Furthermore, the impact of this one store and the related crime issues placed a burden on the other shops and it reached a point where the bank was actively putting pressure on us to close and sell this business.” After the culmination of several large break-ins – with the biggest one costing £16,000 – it became evident that the family would have to walk away from the store and endeavour to sell
it at a distressed price.
 
#27
Great viewing, great access and a bizzare level of openness extracted from the cons by the film crew.

The prison officers barely seemed in control.
They haven't really been in control for many years.

There has always been a tolerance of prisoner hierarchies, rule-breaking and the like as long as it didn't overstep the mark. This 'understanding' that existed between prisoner and prison authorities was there to maintain a sort of manageable equilibrium. Unfortunately, if you give a criminal an inch, he'll take a mile. As a result, the balance has swung steadily in the prisoners' favour and control has steadily been lost.

Prison officers are always cool towards police when they visit prisons for the purpose of taking out prisoners for interview or dealing with clear-up. I think they resent police being in their domain and upsetting the balance.
 
#28
The drugs get into prison from outside, ask yourself who is smuggling drugs into prison.
Yes. Let's look at that, shall we? How exactly does contraband get into prisons? Unfortunately, most contraband is taken in by corrupt staff. As well as via visits, throw overs, and drones. However; for every corrupt officer, there is an equal number of corrupt non-uniformed grade staff.
Corruption is corruption. And a scumbag c*** is still a scumbag c***.
 
#29
Saw an interesting documentary about American prisons.

Many states ban smoking completely in prisons. The logic is that many prisoners serve very long sentences and the prison system will have to foot the bill for medical treatment required by long term smoking.

One side effect of the tobacco ban is that smuggling of drugs into US prisons has dropped significantly. The cons, gasping for a ciggie, have so much Old Holborn stuffed up their arrses that there's no room for spice, heroin or anything else.

Sentencing policy in America is also very different. They give up on people much more quickly than we do. The three strikes laws mean that, in many prisons, most prisoners are serving whole life tariffs and you can get a whole life tariff for shoplifting in some places.

It's expensive to keep them inside, but less so than dealing with a lifetime of crime when even a shoplifting junkie can cost £60,000 a year in police time and court costs. There are some very interesting statistics in a book called A Land Fit For Criminals that was written by a retired probation officer.

As in Britain, US prison officers are thin on the ground. However, they are relatively well armed. Those in "customer facing" roles seem to carry gas canisters like small fire extinguishers. Gas grenades are used to extract troublesome lags from their cells and the riot squad appear to have taser guns. Guards in unreachable places like watch towers are armed with rifles. Solitary confinement is used extensively and appears to be a substantial deterrent.

Perhaps we could learn a few things from the Americans. We should give Sheriff Joe a miss though. His antics cost Maricopa County over $25 million in fines and compensation. The only reason he's not in jail is because President Trump signed a pardon for him.
 
#30
After a 40 year career in 'law enforcement and 'security'', I can't bring myself to watch any of the TV productions of prison or live police action TV programmes. The tolerance of 'the state', in terms of the reaction to anti-social behaviour is the sole cause of the behaviour we see on camera.
The only programmes that entertain me today are the 'Can't pay, we'll take it away', type of tv. This actually punishes the wrong doers and highlights the plight of ordinary working folk, fcuked over by scum, mostly imported. I say 'entertained', I mean proven right and feeling more than a little smug about my political leaning.
 
#32
The drugs get into prison from outside, ask yourself who is smuggling drugs into prison.
A stoned prisoner is a compliant prisoner.
Both observations are bang on.
And you could as well, I suppose, work out how much more street drugs are worth on the inside than they are on the outside, particularly considering how much prison officers are paid. The temptation for them to go off the rails must be strong if, as I'd suspect, they reason how much a few successful smuggling forays will help out with their retirement or whatever.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#33
Yes. Let's look at that, shall we? How exactly does contraband get into prisons? Unfortunately, most contraband is taken in by corrupt staff. As well as via visits, throw overs, and drones. However; for every corrupt officer, there is an equal number of corrupt non-uniformed grade staff.
Corruption is corruption. And a scumbag c*** is still a scumbag c***.
I'd venture a guess at less than 10% of prison officers HMP or private are involved, however it only needs one or two. A small number of male officers have been caught in relationships with female prisoners which leaves them open to blackmail and thus becoming drugs mules. Putting women officers in doesn't work as many of them seem to munch the rug and therefore are as vulnerable to a honey trap!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#34
The temptation for them to go off the rails must be strong if, as I'd suspect, they reason how much a few successful smuggling forays will help out with their retirement or whatever.
I'm not poor by any standards but how a prison officer in the south east can afford a new car and a high end model is worrying! Go to any HMP and see the cars in the staff car park area, lots of shiny new Audis, BMW's and the odd £80k range rover. Now are they really leasing them on PCP or is PCP funding them?
 
#35
There is also a considerable inducement for prisoners to get officers to do some smuggling: simple blackmail. Once an officer becomes induced to do this, prisoners have something on the man or woman which they can use to their advantage. This in turn leads to the more clever corrupt officers perhaps setting up an outsider or another officer to do their dirty work. One could perhaps write a fairly good crime novel with these things as its theme.
 
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ugly

LE
Moderator
#37
#38
Just watching it now and act bit where team about to storm cell. All looks good until you see one woman with 4 foot of ponytail out from under her helmet. I'm no expert but surely that is a little bit stupid.....?
 
#39
I'm not poor by any standards but how a prison officer in the south east can afford a new car and a high end model is worrying!
Yep. Because it ain't like people go in to the Prison Service as a second career, or later in life, is it? Nope. It's gotta be corruption.
Also, how do you know that these shiny new cars all belong to officers?
Why not Managers? Nursing staff? Civvie Contractors?
Btw I know young officers who cannot even afford a poxy push bike.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#40
Yep. Because it ain't like people go in to the Prison Service as a second career, or later in life, is it? Nope. It's gotta be corruption.
Also, how do you know that these shiny new cars all belong to officers?
Why not Managers? Nursing staff? Civvie Contractors?
Btw I know young officers who cannot even afford a poxy push bike.
I agree, its not all of them, there are a few with really nice cars, I couldn't afford them on my wages let alone theirs, I am on a second career and have pension money due soon but some of these folk either dont care or dont know what the rest of their colleagues think.
There is corruption, I know there is petty theft in prisons, stuff goes missing all the time and often from the prison safe. Mail withheld or not delivered. Clothes that dont all appear on changeover days. It all goes on. I'm not saying everyone does it, it only needs one or two.

Edited to add, Ho dont take it personally, I dont. I have quit jobs because of the backhander culture. I would often be marginalised for not signing ghost staff in and would take that as a hint.
I dont do corruption its never worth it!
 

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